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Author Topic: Doing Privates in Korea  (Read 14483 times)

Offline meepmoopimmarobots

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Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #40 on: June 16, 2016, 06:17:39 PM »
Thanks to the people posting info!


Some lady I know did privates her whole time in Korea and never got busted, but did get accused of teaching them to a friend and was banned from said friend's apartment building. Said friend was not, in fact, receiving private lessons.

Does the lady look obviously foreign? I wonder if some tenant was xenophobic and schemed to get rid of the foreigner. CONSPIRACY!!  :shocked:

Yeah, she did, and she's soooooo hot. Like, so INSANELY HOT. They should have been grateful she even graced their dirty old building.

Offline Mr. Pink

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Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #41 on: June 16, 2016, 07:53:09 PM »
i don't suppose this lady's name rhymes with 'bleepbloopimmagobots' does it?  :wink:

Offline user17

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Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #42 on: June 16, 2016, 08:04:52 PM »
If you are married to a Korean surely you are on the F visa and the bonus of that is, you can do privates legally. Perfect for some extra money.

To add to what Menlyn said, the thing is, you may not realize it but most contracts stipulate that you are not allowed to take additional jobs (e.g., teaching privates), regardless of your visa status, despite that immigration-wise, it's not illegal for F-visa holders to do additional jobs -- but if your contract says you can't (again, regardless of your visa status), then technically you're not supposed to (or else risk getting in trouble with your main job or possibly even get fired). I have an F visa and every contract I've ever had in Korea all contained such stipulation (me not being allowed to take on any additional work outside of my main job). It didn't matter to any of my jobs I've held in Korea that my visa status is an F visa; the contract stipulation of not being allowed to take on any extra side jobs still applies to me.

This is surprising. Any idea why this is the case?

probably because they want people to only focus on the one job. this is fairly common as well in a lot of countries, and not just in the ESL field. for both salaried and contract employees, there are often clauses in their employment contracts or rules of employment that state that outside work isn't allowed.

Offline meepmoopimmarobots

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Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #43 on: June 16, 2016, 08:26:09 PM »
i don't suppose this lady's name rhymes with 'bleepbloopimmagobots' does it?  :wink:

THAT'S RACIST!

Offline ciannagh

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Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #44 on: June 16, 2016, 09:44:37 PM »
I taught privates in Korea. I taught 3 per week at 40,000 an hour. I knew it was illegal and that I risked getting caught. I took on the risk because I was paying student loans and still wanted to travel. It helped me bring in an extra 480,000 a month.

The teacher who set me up with it (she had been a sub in my school who also worked as a hagwon teacher) was very aware of the laws. The families I taught for were aware as well, so I wasn't too worried. I also gave all of them a fake name. Also, the privates I taught were on the other side of town so I wasn't worried about seeing students of mine. I'd occasionally see a teacher I knew on the bus on my way there, but it was easy for me lie and say I was meeting with friends to play board games once a week. I was well loved at my school (I was really lucky) so never had an issue.

Offline nomadicmadda

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Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #45 on: June 16, 2016, 10:06:40 PM »
Related but a slight tangent:

How does all the subbing shit work?  I see so many posts asking for substitute teachers for a day or two here and there and all these expats replying to them that have to be on E2 visas.  Are there really just a lot of F-visa foreigners out there snatching these up or is there some weird E2/D10 loophole that people are getting through?  Seems pretty bold that they just comment on them and take them, considering (as another user suspected) it could be used as evidence against them.

Online eggieguffer

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Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #46 on: June 17, 2016, 05:56:16 AM »
Related but a slight tangent:

How does all the subbing shit work?  I see so many posts asking for substitute teachers for a day or two here and there and all these expats replying to them that have to be on E2 visas.  Are there really just a lot of F-visa foreigners out there snatching these up or is there some weird E2/D10 loophole that people are getting through?  Seems pretty bold that they just comment on them and take them, considering (as another user suspected) it could be used as evidence against them.

Someone's offering subbing work at the moment in the job postings section for  60,000 won a day -  eight till six. I don't imagine anyone's going to take that, whatever their visa type. 

Online SuperDoodle23

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Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #47 on: June 17, 2016, 08:03:22 AM »
Related but a slight tangent:

How does all the subbing shit work?  I see so many posts asking for substitute teachers for a day or two here and there and all these expats replying to them that have to be on E2 visas.  Are there really just a lot of F-visa foreigners out there snatching these up or is there some weird E2/D10 loophole that people are getting through?  Seems pretty bold that they just comment on them and take them, considering (as another user suspected) it could be used as evidence against them.

Someone's offering subbing work at the moment in the job postings section for  60,000 won a day -  eight till six. I don't imagine anyone's going to take that, whatever their visa type.

Dear God. That's 6,000 won an hour.

Offline zola

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Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #48 on: June 17, 2016, 08:07:04 AM »
Typical millennials.

6000 buys you a hearty bowl of soup and slice of cheese. You kids don't know the value of money. 
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Offline user17

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Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #49 on: June 17, 2016, 08:32:28 AM »
Related but a slight tangent:

How does all the subbing shit work?  I see so many posts asking for substitute teachers for a day or two here and there and all these expats replying to them that have to be on E2 visas.  Are there really just a lot of F-visa foreigners out there snatching these up or is there some weird E2/D10 loophole that people are getting through?  Seems pretty bold that they just comment on them and take them, considering (as another user suspected) it could be used as evidence against them.

I would guess probably ignorance of the visa laws. although some people are incredibly bold. I saw a girl from Daegu asking on facebook once in a legal help group for some help because a part-time gig she had at a second hagwon wasn't paying her properly. she flat-out admitted that she knew what she was doing was illegal, but she wanted to know if she had any legal recourse anyway. personally don't think admitting to something like that is the smartest thing to do, but anyway.

Offline yirj17

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Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #50 on: June 17, 2016, 08:41:58 AM »
Thanks to the people posting info!


Some lady I know did privates her whole time in Korea and never got busted, but did get accused of teaching them to a friend and was banned from said friend's apartment building. Said friend was not, in fact, receiving private lessons.

Does the lady look obviously foreign? I wonder if some tenant was xenophobic and schemed to get rid of the foreigner. CONSPIRACY!!  :shocked:

Yeah, she did, and she's soooooo hot. Like, so INSANELY HOT. They should have been grateful she even graced their dirty old building.

Maybe someone hit on her and got rejected so decided to get revenge. Hahaha

Offline nomadicmadda

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Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #51 on: June 17, 2016, 12:43:39 PM »
Related but a slight tangent:

How does all the subbing shit work?  I see so many posts asking for substitute teachers for a day or two here and there and all these expats replying to them that have to be on E2 visas.  Are there really just a lot of F-visa foreigners out there snatching these up or is there some weird E2/D10 loophole that people are getting through?  Seems pretty bold that they just comment on them and take them, considering (as another user suspected) it could be used as evidence against them.

I would guess probably ignorance of the visa laws. although some people are incredibly bold. I saw a girl from Daegu asking on facebook once in a legal help group for some help because a part-time gig she had at a second hagwon wasn't paying her properly. she flat-out admitted that she knew what she was doing was illegal, but she wanted to know if she had any legal recourse anyway. personally don't think admitting to something like that is the smartest thing to do, but anyway.

Right??  I feel like you'd have to be stupid to take them, and I can't imagine there's any contract, so nu guarantee of pay.  Plus, even a banking transfer from payment would be evidence  :huh:

Offline chris0206

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Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #52 on: June 17, 2016, 02:18:49 PM »
If you are married to a Korean surely you are on the F visa and the bonus of that is, you can do privates legally. Perfect for some extra money.

To add to what Menlyn said, the thing is, you may not realize it but most contracts stipulate that you are not allowed to take additional jobs (e.g., teaching privates), regardless of your visa status, despite that immigration-wise, it's not illegal for F-visa holders to do additional jobs -- but if your contract says you can't (again, regardless of your visa status), then technically you're not supposed to (or else risk getting in trouble with your main job or possibly even get fired). I have an F visa and every contract I've ever had in Korea all contained such stipulation (me not being allowed to take on any additional work outside of my main job). It didn't matter to any of my jobs I've held in Korea that my visa status is an F visa; the contract stipulation of not being allowed to take on any extra side jobs still applies to me.

This is surprising. Any idea why this is the case?

It is because teachers in public schools are considered government workers (civil servants).  It is illegal in South Korea for government workers to earn extra money outside of their job.  The reason being it is meant to cut down on bribery and making people influence policies in certain ways. 

Therefore because we work at public schools for the local MOE or what ever we are also considered government officials.

Offline welcomebackkotter

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Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #53 on: June 17, 2016, 02:59:59 PM »
If you are married to a Korean surely you are on the F visa and the bonus of that is, you can do privates legally. Perfect for some extra money.

To add to what Menlyn said, the thing is, you may not realize it but most contracts stipulate that you are not allowed to take additional jobs (e.g., teaching privates), regardless of your visa status, despite that immigration-wise, it's not illegal for F-visa holders to do additional jobs -- but if your contract says you can't (again, regardless of your visa status), then technically you're not supposed to (or else risk getting in trouble with your main job or possibly even get fired). I have an F visa and every contract I've ever had in Korea all contained such stipulation (me not being allowed to take on any additional work outside of my main job). It didn't matter to any of my jobs I've held in Korea that my visa status is an F visa; the contract stipulation of not being allowed to take on any extra side jobs still applies to me.

This is surprising. Any idea why this is the case?

It is because teachers in public schools are considered government workers (civil servants).  It is illegal in South Korea for government workers to earn extra money outside of their job.  The reason being it is meant to cut down on bribery and making people influence policies in certain ways. 

Therefore because we work at public schools for the local MOE or what ever we are also considered government officials.

I know this is totally true, but bribing public school Native English Teachers will get no-one nothing, and we certain have zero influence on policy, so it would seem irrelevant to us.  Yes, we are technically public servants, but it's a shame that we can't be placed in a different category or some such. 

I have been told that if you get permission from your principal you are free to work somewhere else - as long as it is approved by your school.  But I haven't tried it myself yet.

Offline donuts81

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Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #54 on: June 17, 2016, 04:31:14 PM »
If you are married to a Korean surely you are on the F visa and the bonus of that is, you can do privates legally. Perfect for some extra money.

To add to what Menlyn said, the thing is, you may not realize it but most contracts stipulate that you are not allowed to take additional jobs (e.g., teaching privates), regardless of your visa status, despite that immigration-wise, it's not illegal for F-visa holders to do additional jobs -- but if your contract says you can't (again, regardless of your visa status), then technically you're not supposed to (or else risk getting in trouble with your main job or possibly even get fired). I have an F visa and every contract I've ever had in Korea all contained such stipulation (me not being allowed to take on any additional work outside of my main job). It didn't matter to any of my jobs I've held in Korea that my visa status is an F visa; the contract stipulation of not being allowed to take on any extra side jobs still applies to me.

This is surprising. Any idea why this is the case?

It's just a cut and paste contract. Personally, I ignore it.

The clause is only there to cover the school's butt if you get busted, or maybe if you work at an academy and want to work for the competitor. At every school I've worked at, PS and private, the Korean teachers have either come to me and asked for classes for themselves or asked on behalf of a friend. That clause by itself is not going to get you fired, especially if you are F-visa.

Korean's aren't stupid, they know what is going on. I've always been reasonably open with my schools and they have always been understanding in return. Of course, if you were a bit shady, lazy or useless then your school might use the clause as an excuse to get rid of you. I guess you could get unlucky as well. Has to happen to someone.
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Offline fastforward

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Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #55 on: June 17, 2016, 04:34:27 PM »
This is surprising. Any idea why this is the case?

I don't really know, but if I had to take a guess, I suppose because all of my contracts for all the jobs I've ever held in Korea (jobs I've held not at the same time, obviously) were/are written for a person who would either need visa sponsorship (by the employer) or already have his/her own visa (i.e. an F visa), so the contract is laid out the same, regardless of the person's visa status, depending on the potential employee they can find and hire. And I suppose they don't want to bother modifying/tailoring the contract to have different stipulations/exceptions for an F-visa holder, I guess -- so basically I'm still subject to the same contract and contract stipulations as someone who would need his/her employer to sponsor his/her visa, regardless of the fact that I have my own visa and don't need visa sponsorship from my employer.

But yeah, to be honest, it always kind of bothers me whenever I hear people go around saying that F-visa holders can take on extra jobs no problem, because it is kind of a misconception -- at least in my personal experience -- in the sense that all the job contracts I've ever had in Korea contained the stipulation that I can't take on any extra side jobs, or else risk getting in trouble with my job (which I assume includes the possibility of getting fired), so I haven't felt I've ever gotten to experience/reap the benefits of this so-called F-visa perk of getting to take on all these extra side jobs or anything, despite my F-visa status. I have yet to encounter a job contract in Korea that doesn't contain this stipulation -- maybe they exist, but again, I have yet to encounter one.

All part-time jobs don't have that in the contract. If you are taking a full time job, then I would assume that clause would be in there.

Work part time jobs with private classes as well.

Offline Mezoti97

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Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #56 on: June 17, 2016, 06:30:57 PM »

All part-time jobs don't have that in the contract. If you are taking a full time job, then I would assume that clause would be in there.

Work part time jobs with private classes as well.

Yeah, I've only ever held full-time jobs in Korea, so I was referring to full-time job contracts. I thought that was implied in my previous post, but I guess apparently not.

Offline fastforward

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Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #57 on: June 18, 2016, 12:24:33 AM »

All part-time jobs don't have that in the contract. If you are taking a full time job, then I would assume that clause would be in there.

Work part time jobs with private classes as well.

Yeah, I've only ever held full-time jobs in Korea, so I was referring to full-time job contracts. I thought that was implied in my previous post, but I guess apparently not.

I'm saying that's how you take Advantage of your F visa. By taking part time jobs and working private classes As well.

Offline Andy73

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Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #58 on: June 18, 2016, 11:49:17 AM »
I've been offered jobs walking through Emart. Well.... my wife has been offered job offers directed at me. She's Korean so I've had a few Korean moms stop her and I in the kimchi aisle and ask her if I'd be willing to do private lessons.

I turn them down because I'm with EPIK and don't want to ruin a good thing if I get caught. There was actually a "spy" of sorts in our city. He (Korean) was going around and trying to get foreign teachers at public schools to do privates in order to turn them in.

If you are married to a Korean surely you are on the F visa and the bonus of that is, you can do privates legally. Perfect for some extra money.

Private work is still against the EPIK contract. This rule also applies to Korean teachers. While he won't be deported or face any issues from immigration, it's grounds for dismissal.

Here's a story.  F holder was working part time at a hogwon.  Immi did a sweep, and detained him along with some E visa holders (who were working illegal, as it wasn't their primary job, or registered with immi).  They asked him for his main school/work name and phone number; he refused.  They kept pressuring him, and he kept refusing.  F holders are not required to give this info, but they want to call his Full Time employer and try to get you on a contract violation.  So don't tell them.  They kept him for an hour, then let him go home.  Don't be fooled by their trick; "we can clear this up with a simple phone call", they're trying to screw you.


Offline KimDuHan

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Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #59 on: June 19, 2016, 01:29:15 PM »
I've been offered jobs walking through Emart. Well.... my wife has been offered job offers directed at me. She's Korean so I've had a few Korean moms stop her and I in the kimchi aisle and ask her if I'd be willing to do private lessons.

I turn them down because I'm with EPIK and don't want to ruin a good thing if I get caught. There was actually a "spy" of sorts in our city. He (Korean) was going around and trying to get foreign teachers at public schools to do privates in order to turn them in.

If you are married to a Korean surely you are on the F visa and the bonus of that is, you can do privates legally. Perfect for some extra money.

Private work is still against the EPIK contract. This rule also applies to Korean teachers. While he won't be deported or face any issues from immigration, it's grounds for dismissal.

Here's a story.  F holder was working part time at a hogwon.  Immi did a sweep, and detained him along with some E visa holders (who were working illegal, as it wasn't their primary job, or registered with immi).  They asked him for his main school/work name and phone number; he refused.  They kept pressuring him, and he kept refusing.  F holders are not required to give this info, but they want to call his Full Time employer and try to get you on a contract violation.  So don't tell them.  They kept him for an hour, then let him go home.  Don't be fooled by their trick; "we can clear this up with a simple phone call", they're trying to screw you.

On an F6 visa you hold not responsibility to your employer outside of working hours unless your employer puts in a clause that you can't work anywhere else. This is hard to enforce though because your visa is connected to your marriage and not your boss.

However on an F6 visa you could get in trouble or deported though if you are earning undeclared money. In most countries foreigners earning under the table money face fines and being deported it's not just Korea.