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Author Topic: THE NETFLIX KOREA THREAD  (Read 35724 times)

Offline johnny russian

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THE NETFLIX KOREA THREAD
« on: February 01, 2016, 07:17:11 PM »
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U.S. video service provider Netflix that entered the South Korean market early this year lacks an adult verification system, making teenagers vulnerable to X-rated content, industry sources said Monday.

Local users can open a Netflix account by typing in an email address and their credit card information and simply checking "I am over 18, and I agree to the above conditions and the Terms of Use and Privacy/Cookies."

The Netflix site doesn't have an adult authentication system, so a minor can use his or her parents' credit card to open a Netflix account and gain unlimited access to adult-only content, according to the sources.

In contrast, other South Korean content providers verify whether users are adults by comparing their names with personal information provided by mobile phone carriers.

Netflix said it did not consider it necessary to adopt a stricter verification policy in South Korea, as credit cards are already issued only to adults.

"Netflix also operates a pin-code system that can ban minors' access to regulated materials," a Seoul-based spokesperson said, adding that the existing system also meets the country's related rules.

The company's categorization of contents also differs from South Korea's standards, as the minimum age requirement for adult content on Netflix is 16. In contrast, the country applies two standards on such materials, with one imposing an age limit of 19, while the other limits the scope of theaters that can play the content.

"We are in discussion with local regulators such as the Korea Media Rating Board on the matter," the official added. "If there are other requirements made by the authority, we are always open to follow them. Netflix does not impose a unilateral grading system on all countries."

The U.S. giant holds around 75 million users around the globe in 190 countries. The company has not released the number of users per country, but the release of the service in Seoul has been cited as industry watchers as a significant change in the local video-streaming market. (Yonhap)

http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/opinon/2016/02/123_196899.html
« Last Edit: May 10, 2016, 03:11:32 PM by johnny russian »

Offline George Washington

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Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2016, 07:35:58 PM »
The only complaint I have is that I still need to use my VPN to access Netflix back at home. Many of the shows that I have been binge watching aren't available on the Korean Netflix yet.
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Offline maximmm

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Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2016, 07:38:16 PM »
Every country I'm in - there are always torrents.  It's great, really.

Online Mister Tim

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Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2016, 08:17:37 PM »
Netflix has X-rated content?

...where?

You know, for science.

The only complaint I have is that I still need to use my VPN to access Netflix back at home. Many of the shows that I have been binge watching aren't available on the Korean Netflix yet.

Get Smartflix.

EDIT for clarification: Smartflix is a program run by a company that has its own proxies, so you don't have to use a separate one of your own, and it pools content from multiple markets into one place.

That means it has the local regional content, but also content from the US, UK, Canada, and other countries that have exclusive content. That way you can watch a bunch of stuff from different regions without having to change server locations on your VPN every time you want to access another region.

It's free now while it's in beta, but it'll only be like $8 once it goes into the full release version. That's $8 one time, not monthly. You do already have to have your own Netflix account, though.

No, I don't work for them, I just think it's a cool program, haha.
« Last Edit: February 01, 2016, 08:43:57 PM by Mister Tim »

Offline KoreaBoo

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Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2016, 08:23:50 PM »
Been using Netflix in Korea for years on my Apple TV using Unblock-US.  The Korean version of Netflix has less than 5% of the U.S. availability of content.  If the local Klown gov't has its way, they would censor everything.

As it goes, just use a VPN and watch U.S. content without the censorship that we all agree is better than being permitted to see by the 'regulators' here.

Offline coffeesmith

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Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2016, 08:52:10 PM »
So, logging on to Netflix Korea will be like the online banking system here? Joy.

Offline MayorHaggar

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Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2016, 10:02:40 PM »
So in other words Chaebol Inc is upset that people don't have to jump through stupid and pointless and invasive Ahnware bloatware for years until everyone is shocked that a manager ajusshi sold private user data to hackers at a room salon meeting. More reason to just keep using a VPN.
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Offline Nivea

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Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #7 on: February 02, 2016, 07:30:18 AM »
Maybe parents should watch their kids actions and not let them get their grubby paws on their credit cards. I mean as soon as they check their transactions in their old fashioned bank book or get a text message they should see what their kids are up to.

Also, there is no X-rated content on Netflix, its not a porn site.  This all sounds like smear campaign to give Netflix a bad name so some local company as swoop in a provide a shitty service at twice the price. Netflix should start using some of those Korean defamation laws. I bet there is corporate version in there somewhere.

Offline Menlyn

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Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #8 on: February 02, 2016, 07:36:23 AM »
I like how they're blaming the age verification system...'oh noes think of the children.'

The only way a minor can access the system is if they steal (borrow) someone else's credit card. A transaction which will immediately show up on that person's phone. If you're willing to borrow your mom's credit card without her knowledge, the Korean style verification wouldn't do much...as you'd just need to use your mom's ID number and borrow her phone for 5 minutes. (To be fair, trying to get a phone away from a Korean woman, is easier said than done....maybe you can wait till she's in the shower or something).

That said, why wouldn't Korea inc. complain. The local portal offers one season of a show for W4000, kinda hard to compete with "unlimited" for $10.

PS. Is there really much adult content on Netflix, or by adult content, are we talking a R movies etc?

Offline Nivea

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Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #9 on: February 02, 2016, 07:48:23 AM »
I like how they're blaming the age verification system...'oh noes think of the children.'

The only way a minor can access the system is if they steal (borrow) someone else's credit card. A transaction which will immediately show up on that person's phone. If you're willing to borrow your mom's credit card without her knowledge, the Korean style verification wouldn't do much...as you'd just need to use your mom's ID number and borrow her phone for 5 minutes. (To be fair, trying to get a phone away from a Korean woman, is easier said than done....maybe you can wait till she's in the shower or something).

That said, why wouldn't Korea inc. complain. The local portal offers one season of a show for W4000, kinda hard to compete with "unlimited" for $10.

PS. Is there really much adult content on Netflix, or by adult content, are we talking a R movies etc?

Netflix Korea is useful in one regard. I can show movies to my kids in class with Korean subtitles instead of them watching the Harry Potter DVD the other teachers have shown them for the millionth time.

Offline truongt

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Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #10 on: February 02, 2016, 07:49:44 AM »
Or...they could just, you know, not let their kids get a hold of their credit cards.

Incidentally, even though the Korean Netflix selection is smaller, it's also different from the US selection. I think the "Kids" selection in particular might be larger here...

Offline Jada4

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Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #11 on: February 02, 2016, 07:52:46 AM »
If a child can steal or borrow your CC to get something like Netflix they can also steal or borrow your cell phone to "verify" that they are over the required age limit.   

Also, I don't think they are taking into consideration that their 19 is "our" 17.... which is just a year older than 16.  They are trying their best to make it sound worse than it really is.

Offline Schellib39

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Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #12 on: February 02, 2016, 07:58:20 AM »
Netflix is planning to crack down on many users accessing the USA Netflix using VPNs.

http://www.wired.com/2016/01/netflixs-vpn-ban-isnt-good-for-anyone-especially-netflix/

Offline Lurch

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Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #13 on: February 02, 2016, 08:02:56 AM »
If a child can steal or borrow your CC to get something like Netflix they can also steal or borrow your cell phone to "verify" that they are over the required age limit.   

Also, I don't think they are taking into consideration that their 19 is "our" 17.... which is just a year older than 16.  They are trying their best to make it sound worse than it really is.

For legal purposes, Koreans use their western style age. Go figure.

Is anyone surprised by this? I printed out tax documents yesterday, and I had to install at least 6 different pieces of bloatware in order to get my eletronic banking certificate from my phone to my computer, then another half dozen to use that to download my tax documents. The tax site required I go into Internet Options and change settings on my browser to use it, and the whole process crashed Chrome which I was running in the background.

Online Mister Tim

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Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #14 on: February 02, 2016, 08:14:28 AM »
Netflix is planning to crack down on many users accessing the USA Netflix using VPNs.

http://www.wired.com/2016/01/netflixs-vpn-ban-isnt-good-for-anyone-especially-netflix/

That rumor's been floating around for years, including recently when Netflix went international. I hope it doesn't happen, but frankly, I'll believe it when I see it. If it does happen, then VPNs will just find new ways to get around it. The only way to block VPNs in the first place (as far as I know) is to block common VPN ISP addresses, so getting around a VPN block could just be as simple as using a different server, and some VPNs have hundreds of servers to choose from.

With things like Kodi/XBMC out there, I might just cancel my Netflix subscription if they decide to block VPNs. Even if there's an easy way around the block, I'd consider cancelling just on principle and sticking with Kodi. If companies are so determined to prevent me from paying for their content, I'm more than happy to use alternative methods to watch it for free. It's their loss, not mine.

Offline seoil

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Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #15 on: February 02, 2016, 08:18:07 AM »
I think over the coming years Korea Inc. will learn all to well that in a world of Free Trade Agreements and Free markets the new definition of competition = you have to compete.

Offline Hot6^

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Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #16 on: February 02, 2016, 09:00:54 AM »
I'm sorry, but this country is ****** retarded.

Quote
"They only require a parents credit card...."


OK, so maybe parents shouldn't just hand out their credit cards to their children? dafuq? Or at least monitor what they are purchasing.
It's funny, because right after that, it is said you can input a required security pin, making the original point moot.

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"The age limit for adult content is only 16..."


Okay, yet I saw plenty of parents taking there kids to go see The Revenant... LOL

I was completely shocked, as one girl looked ony 3/4 years of age. Not to mention the countless other adult films they take them to go see at CGV.



also, like others have mentioned, all the adult: No bra, No pantie, Not stocking... fliers on the ground everywhere, or the straight up call girl cards everywhere....


Or the red light districts everywhere etc.... or ****** sluts dancing around on stage in nothing, but it's called music....


but ya now, **** THOSE FOREIGNERS, AND THEIR COMPANIES!
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Offline CO2

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Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #17 on: February 02, 2016, 09:11:19 AM »
I'm sorry, but this country is ****** retarded.

Quote
"They only require a parents credit card...."


OK, so maybe parents shouldn't just hand out their credit cards to their children? dafuq? Or at least monitor what they are purchasing.
It's funny, because right after that, it is said you can input a required security pin, making the original point moot.

Quote
"The age limit for adult content is only 16..."


Okay, yet I saw plenty of parents taking there kids to go see The Revenant... LOL

I was completely shocked, as one girl looked ony 3/4 years of age. Not to mention the countless other adult films they take them to go see at CGV.



also, like others have mentioned, all the adult: No bra, No pantie, Not stocking... fliers on the ground everywhere, or the straight up call girl cards everywhere....


Or the red light districts everywhere etc.... or ****** sluts dancing around on stage in nothing, but it's called music....


but ya now, **** THOSE FOREIGNERS, AND THEIR COMPANIES!

But some children will use their parent's cards against their wishes, shouldn't we ban an entire industry due to them not being able to control their special flowers?
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Offline yfb

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Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #18 on: February 02, 2016, 09:18:21 AM »
This is one of the worst articles from the KT and that's saying something. I tried posting this in their article comments section, but it keeps thinking I'm spamming it. Feel free to copy-paste.

Who wrote this article?
Who is this "industry source"?
What "X-rated" content is on Netflix? They don't show porn.
Why is there no hit-piece on Korean VOD services that require the exact same thing, or at the very least, an easily-swiped RRN?

Offline matthews_world

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Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #19 on: February 02, 2016, 09:18:25 AM »
Yes, little Bum Su can use a smartphone and easily gain access to shadow banking accounts, if the password is automatically realized, and register for games and websites and the like.  Many a Korean child has run up phone bills due to this.

Downloading in S. Korea is superfast using torrent clients.  I've not used Netflix once since I've been in Asia.  Torrents are your friends.  Even Netflix or Amazon programming can be found via torrent, plus all the adult programming you want. 

These people like Google and Netflix want to keep restricting our use of the Internet.  It's getting out of control.  Your local service providers in the US monitor each IP for illegal downloading and will cut you off.

Many expats use torrents and Google freely in China behind a VPN.