December 19, 2018, 09:25:09 PM


Author Topic: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.  (Read 858721 times)

Online kyndo

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5080 on: May 09, 2018, 03:15:24 PM »
Gamsamayo.
Me right now
The tool buttons are pretty cool, and you can do a lot of nifty things with them, but there are a few functions that you can't do using the buttons.
Alt text is a great example. To make little sentences that can only be seen by hovering mouse pointer on text (or picture), do the following (but with square brackets instead of parentheses):

(abbr=type the super secret alt text that you want to have appear here)enter the text or picture you want people to hover there mouse over here(/abbr)
     It should end up looking like this: enter the text or picture you want people to hover there mouse over here




Also, if you're the passive aggressive type, it might be nice that you can hide your incredibly witty insults by selecting the text, and colouring them beige. Just be aware that if anybody quotes you, your horrific insults will be generally visible, as quote box background colour is white.


Finally, here's a handy tool to avoid being a tool like CO2 (:P):
You can resize images by inserting desired pixel count in the insert image code, like so:
(img width=20)https://avatars3.githubusercontent.com/u/16444552?s=460&v=4(/img)

Which ends up like this:
Because every poster needs this particular emoticon:

« Last Edit: May 09, 2018, 03:33:05 PM by kyndo »

Online CO2

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5081 on: May 09, 2018, 03:17:36 PM »
Finally, here's a handy tool to avoid being a tool like CO2 (:P):
You can resize images by inserting desired pixel count in the insert image code, like so:

Because every poster needs this particular emoticon:
Yes, to dance beneath the diamond sky
With one hand waving free

Offline Pennypie

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5082 on: May 09, 2018, 03:31:37 PM »

Sorry but why is it such a big deal?

These kids are never going to sound like a native speaker. They aren't native speakers.

but showing the kids the pronunciation in their own language helps them when they are first learning. It gives them something to relate to .

It also helps lower level kids to participate when they would otherwise have no chance.

I know when I first arrived I learned Hangul using English pronunciation guides.

Are you saying you didn't? You learned using only Hangul and sounds?


The difference there is there aren't any sounds in Korean that can't be represented with the Roman alphabet, whereas there are sounds in English that can't be represented with Hangul. It's fine to use Hangul as a reference to show them how to pronounce their corresponding English sounds, but for those sounds for where there is no Hangul equivalent, it's doing the students a disservice to continue to rely on Hangul for phonetic representation. If they want to use ㅋ to teach the "k" sound, fine, but using ㅍ to teach "f" is... less fine. Especially if it's drilled and/or used regularly.

It's probably also worth making the distinction between learning pronunciation at the beginning of a course, and pronunciation guides in subsequent chapters. It's probably common enough for Korean courses for English speakers to use the roman alphabet in the chapter about pronunciation. After that, though, don't most decent Korean courses use Hangul exclusively? I might be misremembering, but I'm reasonably sure all the Korean books I have use only Hangul for the vocab lists, dialogues, activities, and whatnot; they don't have the romanizations for anything. I suppose a "Learn Korean Fast!" type book geared towards tourists might continue to rely on romanizations, but the pronunciation of the people who use them probably suffers accordingly, haha.

Of course, English spelling and pronunciation rules are considerably more complex than Korean. There's certainly much more involved than could be expected to be taught in a single chapter, as can be done with Korean pronunciation. I do understand how that might increase the helpfulness of pronunciation guides written in a learner's first language, though I'd prefer it's with the understanding that it's only an approximation, and I certainly don't think it'd be a good idea for a Korean teacher to drill pronunciation based on the Hangul rather than the English. I also understand that that isn't always avoidable, since the abilities of the teachers varies significantly, but hey. That's what we're here for.  ;D

I pretty much agree with everything you're saying here Mr.Tim.

I certainly don't think Hangul should be used all the time, just when needed and right at the start.

I just think that people here could be doing their students a disservice if we cause them to be too insecure about pronunciation (Not you!  :laugh:).

I've met many Koreans / Korean teachers who are scared to speak because they feel like their pronunciation is bad. Sometimes it is pretty bad but i still wish they'd try. I guess that's my main point. I sort of went off track though.

 Yes it's important, but sometimes close enough can be okay too.

I think because the OP I saw was talking about the alphabet so that's why I mentioned using Hangul.

Offline Pennypie

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5083 on: May 09, 2018, 03:32:21 PM »
Anyway...writing in the Friday ramblings thread makes me really really wish it was Friday.  :cry: :cry: :cry:

Online Mister Tim

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5084 on: May 09, 2018, 04:34:27 PM »

I've met many Koreans / Korean teachers who are scared to speak because they feel like their pronunciation is bad. Sometimes it is pretty bad but i still wish they'd try. I guess that's my main point. I sort of went off track though.

 Yes it's important, but sometimes close enough can be okay too.


I'm definitely with you there. When communicating in English is the end goal, heavily accented English is better than no English at all.

Many of us here have complained about Koreans not being able to understand our Korean if it isn't perfect even though we can understand their imperfect English, so we'd be being a bit hypocritical if we were to try to place overmuch importance on perfect pronunciation. More often than not, close enough is good enough.

I also couldn't possibly agree any harder about wishing my students would just try. My classroom has five rules, which I teach/review at the beginning of every semester:

1) No sleeping.
2) No talking when the teacher is talking.
3) Always bring your English book and a pencil or pen.
4) Be respectful to everyone.
5) Try your best. Mistakes are okay!

Sure, it's annoying when students don't follow rules 1 through 4, but it's 5 that I really wish they'd take to heart. They've just had the whole "perfection or nothing" mentality drilled into them for so long that it can be a real bear trying to help them understand that making mistakes will actually help them learn.

Online JNM

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5085 on: May 10, 2018, 06:37:57 AM »

Online CO2

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5086 on: May 10, 2018, 07:37:42 AM »
Chart of languages and countries.

http://www.visualcapitalist.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/world-of-languages.html
Why isn't England in the English section??? Is it the unlabeled purple section next to Malaysia?
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With one hand waving free

Online JNM

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5087 on: May 10, 2018, 08:59:19 AM »
Chart of languages and countries.

http://www.visualcapitalist.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/world-of-languages.html
Why isn't England in the English section??? Is it the unlabeled purple section next to Malaysia?
Included in the UK section, I presume.

Online CO2

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5088 on: May 10, 2018, 09:07:29 AM »
Why isn't England in the English section??? Is it the unlabeled purple section next to Malaysia?
Included in the UK section, I presume.
[/quote]

I am an idiot. hahahaha It's not even like I didn't know that the UK is the overarching place, I didn't even........... see it? I need more sleep.
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With one hand waving free

Online JNM

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5089 on: May 10, 2018, 09:13:17 AM »
Why isn't England in the English section??? Is it the unlabeled purple section next to Malaysia?
Included in the UK section, I presume.

I am an idiot. hahahaha It's not even like I didn't know that the UK is the overarching place, I didn't even........... see it? I need more sleep.
[/quote]

Also, the purple section labeled + is "others".

Offline AvecPommesFrites

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5090 on: May 10, 2018, 09:56:40 AM »
Kyndo got the skills to pay the bills.

Can I refill your eggnog for you? Get you something to eat? Drive you out to the middle of nowhere and leave you for dead?

Offline Kayos

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5091 on: May 10, 2018, 10:22:06 AM »
I know you're all going to hit me with a 1000 reasons why I'm wrong.
Here's one reason.



I'm not understanding the picture TBH. I'm not sure if it's just going over my head, I'm still too tired to think about it enough, or if I'm just a dumb-dumb head. :o (probably the latter)

Offline Kayos

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5092 on: May 10, 2018, 10:41:33 AM »
I'm of the opinion that people are either [naturally] good at pronunciation or they're not (though, like with most skills, I do think that repeated exposure and practice can potentially lead to improvement).  I taught kids way out in the boonies where hagwons don't exist and [English speaking] foreigners are exceptionally rare.  I was pleasantly surprised at how [relatively, yes] good a lot of the kids' pronunciations were.  Many were able to follow and repeat pretty darn well my way of pronouncing things.  And yes, some students did have heavier Korean accents than others. 

Some languages do not Romanize well.  Korean is one of them.  Similarly, applying the Korean way of pronouncing things onto other languages such as English generally just does not yield good results.  I'm not opposed to struggling, low English level students using hangeul because I'd rather the students participate and feel included.  But once anyone gets past the basics (whether for English or Korean or whatever), I think it's more detrimental than beneficial to continue using one's native language as a crutch.

I'm in a spot like that now. My new first graders have great pronunciation.
Actually, one of my co-teachers is a young Korean lady. Her pronunciation is pretty good too. Yesterday in class, she was helping the super low level student, and she mistakenly sad "Dog-gu" instead of "dog". We both, and the students as well, had a pretty good laugh at that haha.

I rarely use hangul in my lessons. The rare times I do use it, is I have something in one of my ppt slides of something that is very difficult to explain simply. And it's never used for pronunciation, just for them to understand what it is (by reading the Korean word of it).

Online kyndo

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5093 on: May 10, 2018, 11:41:59 AM »
I'm of the opinion that people are either [naturally] good at pronunciation or they're not (though, like with most skills, I do think that repeated exposure and practice can potentially lead to improvement).  I taught kids way out in the boonies where hagwons don't exist and [English speaking] foreigners are exceptionally rare.  I was pleasantly surprised at how [relatively, yes] good a lot of the kids' pronunciations were.  Many were able to follow and repeat pretty darn well my way of pronouncing things.  And yes, some students did have heavier Korean accents than others. 

Some languages do not Romanize well.  Korean is one of them.  Similarly, applying the Korean way of pronouncing things onto other languages such as English generally just does not yield good results.  I'm not opposed to struggling, low English level students using hangeul because I'd rather the students participate and feel included.  But once anyone gets past the basics (whether for English or Korean or whatever), I think it's more detrimental than beneficial to continue using one's native language as a crutch.

I'm in a spot like that now. My new first graders have great pronunciation.
Actually, one of my co-teachers is a young Korean lady. Her pronunciation is pretty good too. Yesterday in class, she was helping the super low level student, and she mistakenly sad "Dog-gu" instead of "dog". We both, and the students as well, had a pretty good laugh at that haha.

I rarely use hangul in my lessons. The rare times I do use it, is I have something in one of my ppt slides of something that is very difficult to explain simply. And it's never used for pronunciation, just for them to understand what it is (by reading the Korean word of it).
I think that some minimum of hangeul can be helpful with, as you mentioned, difficult concepts etc.

I also like to point out that transliterations of English words into Korean script using Korean writing conventions inevitably lead to atrocities like "아이스크림" I encourage students to use hangeul in a linear way to prevent the addition of a bajillion additional syllables: "ㅏㅣㅅㅋㄹ ㅣㅁ".  The kids get a kick out of it, and it emphasizes how the pronunciation of the two languages is fundamentally different.



Online JNM

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5094 on: May 10, 2018, 12:39:44 PM »
I'm of the opinion that people are either [naturally] good at pronunciation or they're not (though, like with most skills, I do think that repeated exposure and practice can potentially lead to improvement).  I taught kids way out in the boonies where hagwons don't exist and [English speaking] foreigners are exceptionally rare.  I was pleasantly surprised at how [relatively, yes] good a lot of the kids' pronunciations were.  Many were able to follow and repeat pretty darn well my way of pronouncing things.  And yes, some students did have heavier Korean accents than others. 

Some languages do not Romanize well.  Korean is one of them.  Similarly, applying the Korean way of pronouncing things onto other languages such as English generally just does not yield good results.  I'm not opposed to struggling, low English level students using hangeul because I'd rather the students participate and feel included.  But once anyone gets past the basics (whether for English or Korean or whatever), I think it's more detrimental than beneficial to continue using one's native language as a crutch.

I'm in a spot like that now. My new first graders have great pronunciation.
Actually, one of my co-teachers is a young Korean lady. Her pronunciation is pretty good too. Yesterday in class, she was helping the super low level student, and she mistakenly sad "Dog-gu" instead of "dog". We both, and the students as well, had a pretty good laugh at that haha.

I rarely use hangul in my lessons. The rare times I do use it, is I have something in one of my ppt slides of something that is very difficult to explain simply. And it's never used for pronunciation, just for them to understand what it is (by reading the Korean word of it).
I think that some minimum of hangeul can be helpful with, as you mentioned, difficult concepts etc.

I also like to point out that transliterations of English words into Korean script using Korean writing conventions inevitably lead to atrocities like "아이스크림" I encourage students to use hangeul in a linear way to prevent the addition of a bajillion additional syllables: "ㅏㅣㅅㅋㄹ ㅣㅁ".  The kids get a kick out of it, and it emphasizes how the pronunciation of the two languages is fundamentally different.

That's awesome.

I know myself that when I read Korean, I always think of ㅎ as H, etc., because I never learned the names of Korean letters. Thinking in syllables led to a big jump in my Korean reading speed, even though compression is still very weak.

Offline Kayos

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5095 on: May 10, 2018, 12:47:20 PM »
I'm of the opinion that people are either [naturally] good at pronunciation or they're not (though, like with most skills, I do think that repeated exposure and practice can potentially lead to improvement).  I taught kids way out in the boonies where hagwons don't exist and [English speaking] foreigners are exceptionally rare.  I was pleasantly surprised at how [relatively, yes] good a lot of the kids' pronunciations were.  Many were able to follow and repeat pretty darn well my way of pronouncing things.  And yes, some students did have heavier Korean accents than others. 

Some languages do not Romanize well.  Korean is one of them.  Similarly, applying the Korean way of pronouncing things onto other languages such as English generally just does not yield good results.  I'm not opposed to struggling, low English level students using hangeul because I'd rather the students participate and feel included.  But once anyone gets past the basics (whether for English or Korean or whatever), I think it's more detrimental than beneficial to continue using one's native language as a crutch.

I'm in a spot like that now. My new first graders have great pronunciation.
Actually, one of my co-teachers is a young Korean lady. Her pronunciation is pretty good too. Yesterday in class, she was helping the super low level student, and she mistakenly sad "Dog-gu" instead of "dog". We both, and the students as well, had a pretty good laugh at that haha.

I rarely use hangul in my lessons. The rare times I do use it, is I have something in one of my ppt slides of something that is very difficult to explain simply. And it's never used for pronunciation, just for them to understand what it is (by reading the Korean word of it).
I think that some minimum of hangeul can be helpful with, as you mentioned, difficult concepts etc.

I also like to point out that transliterations of English words into Korean script using Korean writing conventions inevitably lead to atrocities like "아이스크림" I encourage students to use hangeul in a linear way to prevent the addition of a bajillion additional syllables: "ㅏㅣㅅㅋㄹ ㅣㅁ".  The kids get a kick out of it, and it emphasizes how the pronunciation of the two languages is fundamentally different.

That's awesome.

I know myself that when I read Korean, I always think of ㅎ as H, etc., because I never learned the names of Korean letters. Thinking in syllables led to a big jump in my Korean reading speed, even though compression is still very weak.

I've just started learning hangul recently. The teachers that come to my teachers workshop, are trying to help me by telling me the names of the hangul. But personally, I'm feeling like it isn't helping. When they start telling me the names. It is confusing me to no end. Maybe once I'm better versed with the hangul, and am ready for the sounds of them, it'll be a big help though!

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5096 on: May 10, 2018, 12:50:38 PM »
I'm of the opinion that people are either [naturally] good at pronunciation or they're not (though, like with most skills, I do think that repeated exposure and practice can potentially lead to improvement).  I taught kids way out in the boonies where hagwons don't exist and [English speaking] foreigners are exceptionally rare.  I was pleasantly surprised at how [relatively, yes] good a lot of the kids' pronunciations were.  Many were able to follow and repeat pretty darn well my way of pronouncing things.  And yes, some students did have heavier Korean accents than others. 

Some languages do not Romanize well.  Korean is one of them.  Similarly, applying the Korean way of pronouncing things onto other languages such as English generally just does not yield good results.  I'm not opposed to struggling, low English level students using hangeul because I'd rather the students participate and feel included.  But once anyone gets past the basics (whether for English or Korean or whatever), I think it's more detrimental than beneficial to continue using one's native language as a crutch.

I'm in a spot like that now. My new first graders have great pronunciation.
Actually, one of my co-teachers is a young Korean lady. Her pronunciation is pretty good too. Yesterday in class, she was helping the super low level student, and she mistakenly sad "Dog-gu" instead of "dog". We both, and the students as well, had a pretty good laugh at that haha.

I rarely use hangul in my lessons. The rare times I do use it, is I have something in one of my ppt slides of something that is very difficult to explain simply. And it's never used for pronunciation, just for them to understand what it is (by reading the Korean word of it).
I think that some minimum of hangeul can be helpful with, as you mentioned, difficult concepts etc.

I also like to point out that transliterations of English words into Korean script using Korean writing conventions inevitably lead to atrocities like "아이스크림" I encourage students to use hangeul in a linear way to prevent the addition of a bajillion additional syllables: "ㅏㅣㅅㅋㄹ ㅣㅁ".  The kids get a kick out of it, and it emphasizes how the pronunciation of the two languages is fundamentally different.

That's awesome.

I know myself that when I read Korean, I always think of ㅎ as H, etc., because I never learned the names of Korean letters. Thinking in syllables led to a big jump in my Korean reading speed, even though compression is still very weak.

I've just started learning hangul recently. The teachers that come to my teachers workshop, are trying to help me by telling me the names of the hangul. But personally, I'm feeling like it isn't helping. When they start telling me the names. It is confusing me to no end. Maybe once I'm better versed with the hangul, and am ready for the sounds of them, it'll be a big help though!

It is helpful though because a ㅂ isn't always a ㅂ. haha. Like 밥 is not bab. It's bap. ㅂ at the beginning is b, at the end it's a p sound. Which is why the letters are called 비읍, Bi-eup. 리을 Ri-eul etc
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Online sligo

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5097 on: May 10, 2018, 12:54:40 PM »
I'm of the opinion that people are either [naturally] good at pronunciation or they're not (though, like with most skills, I do think that repeated exposure and practice can potentially lead to improvement).  I taught kids way out in the boonies where hagwons don't exist and [English speaking] foreigners are exceptionally rare.  I was pleasantly surprised at how [relatively, yes] good a lot of the kids' pronunciations were.  Many were able to follow and repeat pretty darn well my way of pronouncing things.  And yes, some students did have heavier Korean accents than others. 

Some languages do not Romanize well.  Korean is one of them.  Similarly, applying the Korean way of pronouncing things onto other languages such as English generally just does not yield good results.  I'm not opposed to struggling, low English level students using hangeul because I'd rather the students participate and feel included.  But once anyone gets past the basics (whether for English or Korean or whatever), I think it's more detrimental than beneficial to continue using one's native language as a crutch.

I'm in a spot like that now. My new first graders have great pronunciation.
Actually, one of my co-teachers is a young Korean lady. Her pronunciation is pretty good too. Yesterday in class, she was helping the super low level student, and she mistakenly sad "Dog-gu" instead of "dog". We both, and the students as well, had a pretty good laugh at that haha.

I rarely use hangul in my lessons. The rare times I do use it, is I have something in one of my ppt slides of something that is very difficult to explain simply. And it's never used for pronunciation, just for them to understand what it is (by reading the Korean word of it).
I think that some minimum of hangeul can be helpful with, as you mentioned, difficult concepts etc.

I also like to point out that transliterations of English words into Korean script using Korean writing conventions inevitably lead to atrocities like "아이스크림" I encourage students to use hangeul in a linear way to prevent the addition of a bajillion additional syllables: "ㅏㅣㅅㅋㄹ ㅣㅁ".  The kids get a kick out of it, and it emphasizes how the pronunciation of the two languages is fundamentally different.

That's awesome.

I know myself that when I read Korean, I always think of ㅎ as H, etc., because I never learned the names of Korean letters. Thinking in syllables led to a big jump in my Korean reading speed, even though compression is still very weak.

I've just started learning hangul recently. The teachers that come to my teachers workshop, are trying to help me by telling me the names of the hangul. But personally, I'm feeling like it isn't helping. When they start telling me the names. It is confusing me to no end. Maybe once I'm better versed with the hangul, and am ready for the sounds of them, it'll be a big help though!

Actually, learning the names will help a lot, as the name is the sound it represents at the top, then the bottom of the syllable you write.

Offline Kayos

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5098 on: May 10, 2018, 01:02:28 PM »
I'm of the opinion that people are either [naturally] good at pronunciation or they're not (though, like with most skills, I do think that repeated exposure and practice can potentially lead to improvement).  I taught kids way out in the boonies where hagwons don't exist and [English speaking] foreigners are exceptionally rare.  I was pleasantly surprised at how [relatively, yes] good a lot of the kids' pronunciations were.  Many were able to follow and repeat pretty darn well my way of pronouncing things.  And yes, some students did have heavier Korean accents than others. 

Some languages do not Romanize well.  Korean is one of them.  Similarly, applying the Korean way of pronouncing things onto other languages such as English generally just does not yield good results.  I'm not opposed to struggling, low English level students using hangeul because I'd rather the students participate and feel included.  But once anyone gets past the basics (whether for English or Korean or whatever), I think it's more detrimental than beneficial to continue using one's native language as a crutch.

I'm in a spot like that now. My new first graders have great pronunciation.
Actually, one of my co-teachers is a young Korean lady. Her pronunciation is pretty good too. Yesterday in class, she was helping the super low level student, and she mistakenly sad "Dog-gu" instead of "dog". We both, and the students as well, had a pretty good laugh at that haha.

I rarely use hangul in my lessons. The rare times I do use it, is I have something in one of my ppt slides of something that is very difficult to explain simply. And it's never used for pronunciation, just for them to understand what it is (by reading the Korean word of it).
I think that some minimum of hangeul can be helpful with, as you mentioned, difficult concepts etc.

I also like to point out that transliterations of English words into Korean script using Korean writing conventions inevitably lead to atrocities like "아이스크림" I encourage students to use hangeul in a linear way to prevent the addition of a bajillion additional syllables: "ㅏㅣㅅㅋㄹ ㅣㅁ".  The kids get a kick out of it, and it emphasizes how the pronunciation of the two languages is fundamentally different.

That's awesome.

I know myself that when I read Korean, I always think of ㅎ as H, etc., because I never learned the names of Korean letters. Thinking in syllables led to a big jump in my Korean reading speed, even though compression is still very weak.

I've just started learning hangul recently. The teachers that come to my teachers workshop, are trying to help me by telling me the names of the hangul. But personally, I'm feeling like it isn't helping. When they start telling me the names. It is confusing me to no end. Maybe once I'm better versed with the hangul, and am ready for the sounds of them, it'll be a big help though!

It is helpful though because a ㅂ isn't always a ㅂ. haha. Like 밥 is not bab. It's bap. ㅂ at the beginning is b, at the end it's a p sound. Which is why the letters are called 비읍, Bi-eup. 리을 Ri-eul etc

Yeah, I understand that. But it's not helping me, personally. When they call it Bi-eup, Ri-eul or whatever. I just get confused and makes it harder, for me personally, to learn. The book I'm learning from, while it doesn't use the hangul names, what it does do, is give me rules on how to use them: like the beginning is a 'b' sound and a 'p' sound at the end.

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5099 on: May 11, 2018, 07:48:40 AM »
We had a visit from our Provincial Education Superintendent this week.  My students were a little dumbfounded by a: he comes in a chauffeur-driven car and b: he gets makeup put on him when he gets out of the car.  :rolleyes:
It's amazing the things like that, that people with even a little bit of power in this country get.
At the uni I used to work at, the President also had a chauffer driven car. Every morning his lackeys would be waiting for him to arrive. They would open his door for him, give him a cup of something, tea or coffee i guess, as soon as he stepped out of the car, and rush beside him with their heads lowered as he walked the few feet to his office. If it was raining they would drive round the back of the building and up the wheelchair ramp so as to not get a single drop of rain on this poor guy's head.

The foreign teachers were presented with some certificate for our "excellent work". We had to go into his office. It was like a royal court. Plebs running around, opening and closing things, pulling out his chair, picking up his pen and handing it to him, so that he didn't have to lower his wrist like 7cm. All this for the president of a small-mid sized, provincial univeristy with a couple of thousand students.

When I was at uni, back in the mists of time, it was one of the biggest in the Southern hemisphere, top 100 ranked in the world, with about 35,000 attending. The Chancellor would ride the bus to work each day.
Kpip! - Martin 2018