November 21, 2018, 01:39:29 AM


Ohmyzip.com From US To Korea - $7.50 (LB)
[SHOP US, SHIP KOREA] From $7.50 (1LB) + $1.74 per pound only! Use the Ohmyzip U.S. a tax-free state address as your shipping address at checkout. Sign up now to get a 10% off coupon on shipping. <Freight Forwarding Service / Courier Service>
http://www.ohmyzip.com/

Author Topic: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.  (Read 816520 times)

Online oglop

  • Hero of Waygookistan
  • *****
  • Posts: 1568
  • Gender: Male
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5400 on: June 20, 2018, 12:42:23 PM »
It does cross my mind that perhaps my students live in a simplified emotional environment where they're not exposed too often to situations that would require them to handle complex emotions, but that's kind of hard to swallow. The fact is they (my students, anyway) have incredibly stable (if risk-averse) family arrangements and living environments, but that kind of stability is largely what a family and good school is good for. Too much of a good thing, perhaps?

Of course my students are younger and the stress of school and social relations tend to pile up in the middle school and high school years. Maybe it just hasn't hit them yet.
yeah, i dunno. sometimes i think that a lot of kids here are pretty sheltered and don't get much life experience (coddled/no responsibility/not allowed to make their own mistakes/etc) and that ends up making them emotionally immature.

i have a 10 year old cousin who is the complete opposite of korean kids. he seems way more mature than korean kids his age. maybe it's because he's given freedom to decide what hobbies he wants, is given responsibility in the house and is allowed to go out and climb/fall out of trees, limited to an hour of video games a week (and happy with it), etc. from my experience, this is the complete opposite of korean kids

i guess my point is that korean kids often feel less 'well-rounded' than kids in the uk/australia who i know, or are family, etc. i think a big part of this is the parenting (and lack thereof)

Online zola

  • The Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 2343
  • Gender: Male
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5401 on: June 20, 2018, 12:55:39 PM »
It does cross my mind that perhaps my students live in a simplified emotional environment where they're not exposed too often to situations that would require them to handle complex emotions, but that's kind of hard to swallow. The fact is they (my students, anyway) have incredibly stable (if risk-averse) family arrangements and living environments, but that kind of stability is largely what a family and good school is good for. Too much of a good thing, perhaps?

Of course my students are younger and the stress of school and social relations tend to pile up in the middle school and high school years. Maybe it just hasn't hit them yet.
yeah, i dunno. sometimes i think that a lot of kids here are pretty sheltered and don't get much life experience (coddled/no responsibility/not allowed to make their own mistakes/etc) and that ends up making them emotionally immature.

i have a 10 year old cousin who is the complete opposite of korean kids. he seems way more mature than korean kids his age. maybe it's because he's given freedom to decide what hobbies he wants, is given responsibility in the house and is allowed to go out and climb/fall out of trees, limited to an hour of video games a week (and happy with it), etc. from my experience, this is the complete opposite of korean kids

i guess my point is that korean kids often feel less 'well-rounded' than kids in the uk/australia who i know, or are family, etc. i think a big part of this is the parenting (and lack thereof)

The kids I teach in their late teens early twenties have less life experience than a 14 year old from where I'm from. So many of them have done nothing. And still do nothing. If it isn't "play games" they are not interested in it. They titter like 10 year olds when someone brings up the word girlfriend or boyfriend.
Kpip! - Martin 2018

Offline JVPrice

  • Expert Waygook
  • ****
  • Posts: 506
  • Gender: Male
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5402 on: June 20, 2018, 01:25:47 PM »
I was talking about speaking tests from the previous week with two of my co-teachers. I made the mistake of telling a student "Very good" as he walked away from his test, and giving him a C. I should've said "Well done" or something because they assumed they were getting an A or B. Forgetting the fact that C is not "good" here. And now my CT tells me the student can have a re-do of the test if he wants. That's not the thing that bugs me though.

What bugs me is when I was explaining to my CTs. When I told them how the lowest score in America is 0 (just to give them perspective), they both went very quiet like I said something forbidden. It was really weird. Almost as if the idea of failure was foreign to them  :lipsrsealed:
The World Ends With You

Offline #basedcowboyshirt

  • Expert Waygook
  • ****
  • Posts: 545
  • Gender: Male
  • My ring is a mansion.
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5403 on: June 20, 2018, 02:03:40 PM »


What bugs me is when I was explaining to my CTs. When I told them how the lowest score in America is 0 (just to give them perspective), they both went very quiet like I said something forbidden. It was really weird. Almost as if the idea of failure was foreign to them :lipsrsealed:

The Korean education system does have a policy of not failing or holding students behind, though. So, the idea of failure [in the sense of not passing a grade due to low scores] is literally foreign to them.

Also, it's dumb and it's not doing the students any favours at all, but it is part of the the forced egalitarianism that people love so much here.

The whole 'minimum score is 50% even if the paper is blank' thing is completely dumb. But I don't understand why people have such a difficult time understanding it.

Offline JVPrice

  • Expert Waygook
  • ****
  • Posts: 506
  • Gender: Male
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5404 on: June 20, 2018, 02:23:02 PM »


What bugs me is when I was explaining to my CTs. When I told them how the lowest score in America is 0 (just to give them perspective), they both went very quiet like I said something forbidden. It was really weird. Almost as if the idea of failure was foreign to them :lipsrsealed:

The Korean education system does have a policy of not failing or holding students behind, though. So, the idea of failure [in the sense of not passing a grade due to low scores] is literally foreign to them.

Also, it's dumb and it's not doing the students any favours at all, but it is part of the the forced egalitarianism that people love so much here.

The whole 'minimum score is 50% even if the paper is blank' thing is completely dumb. But I don't understand why people have such a difficult time understanding it.

I was being sarcastic, but yeah. Let's not forget that so many students graduate with degrees, but can't find a job. If everyone passes, nobody is special.
The World Ends With You

Offline shostager

  • Veteran
  • **
  • Posts: 232
  • Gender: Female
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5405 on: June 20, 2018, 02:32:19 PM »
It does cross my mind that perhaps my students live in a simplified emotional environment where they're not exposed too often to situations that would require them to handle complex emotions, but that's kind of hard to swallow. The fact is they (my students, anyway) have incredibly stable (if risk-averse) family arrangements and living environments, but that kind of stability is largely what a family and good school is good for. Too much of a good thing, perhaps?

Of course my students are younger and the stress of school and social relations tend to pile up in the middle school and high school years. Maybe it just hasn't hit them yet.
yeah, i dunno. sometimes i think that a lot of kids here are pretty sheltered and don't get much life experience (coddled/no responsibility/not allowed to make their own mistakes/etc) and that ends up making them emotionally immature.

i have a 10 year old cousin who is the complete opposite of korean kids. he seems way more mature than korean kids his age. maybe it's because he's given freedom to decide what hobbies he wants, is given responsibility in the house and is allowed to go out and climb/fall out of trees, limited to an hour of video games a week (and happy with it), etc. from my experience, this is the complete opposite of korean kids

i guess my point is that korean kids often feel less 'well-rounded' than kids in the uk/australia who i know, or are family, etc. i think a big part of this is the parenting (and lack thereof)

...My wife is scared of absolutely every insect, even butterflies.  When did that happen?  I know a lot of Korean who have a similar phobia.  Is that from not playing outside?  When I go home, I tell my niece that 'Auntie Park is scared of butterflies'.   :shocked:

My students, and even other teachers, are surprised to hear that I like bugs and even used to raise caterpillars and butterflies. One day, after talking about this, my co-teacher said something like, "You didn't grow up in a city, did you?" I think this makes a little sense. If you live in a place with fewer bugs (especially if you never go out, or are always ferried around in your parents' car / the bus), it's kind of a fear of the unknown, maybe?

Also, hornets here are bigger/scarier than back home (the US). Some spiders, too. Those I will go out of my way to avoid. But butterflies...we even think they're a symbol of beauty in the west, generally...
« Last Edit: June 20, 2018, 02:35:02 PM by shostager »

Offline yirj17

  • The Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 2782
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5406 on: June 20, 2018, 03:05:44 PM »
There's a butterfly festival in Korea, though it's further down south, more in the countryside. 

I find it odd to be afraid of butterflies.  Things with stingers or less pleasant appearances, I get the avoidance. 

Online Chinguetti

  • The Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 2416
  • Gender: Female
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5407 on: June 20, 2018, 03:19:32 PM »
I recently watched a grown man freak out over a moth that managed to make it into my gym last night.

Went into full-fight mode, was very loudly kicking at it and trying to stomp it into the ground. It looked like he was having a seizure.

Online CO2

  • The Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 3883
  • Gender: Male
  • Dharma Initiative
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5408 on: June 20, 2018, 03:23:42 PM »
I don't get the snake hatred. I've seen people go out of their way to kill a garter snake.

There's a cobra in your backyard? Okay.

There's a garter snake across the street? Who gives a shit?

Same with snapping turtles. "They eat the fish." Uhhhhh, yeah? Some fish. You really think you killing a snapper is going to improve your luck next time you're out on the boat?

People are insane.
Yes, to dance beneath the diamond sky
With one hand waving free

Offline #basedcowboyshirt

  • Expert Waygook
  • ****
  • Posts: 545
  • Gender: Male
  • My ring is a mansion.
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5409 on: June 20, 2018, 03:24:17 PM »
I recently watched a grown man freak out over a moth that managed to make it into my gym last night.

Went into full-fight mode, was very loudly kicking at it and trying to stomp it into the ground. It looked like he was having a seizure.

I'm not afraid of bugs or anything at all, and usually will go out of my way to gently pick them up and put them outside. Unless they're like fruit flies or something that are getting all up in my foods.

But, still, if I like, get surprised by something, like a moth is on my shoulder and starts touching my ear and I look down and see it and it's like right in my face, I'll definitely do they full-flight seizure mode thing, too.

Online Chinguetti

  • The Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 2416
  • Gender: Female
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5410 on: June 20, 2018, 03:29:22 PM »
I'm not afraid of bugs or anything at all, and usually will go out of my way to gently pick them up and put them outside. Unless they're like fruit flies or something that are getting all up in my foods.

But, still, if I like, get surprised by something, like a moth is on my shoulder and starts touching my ear and I look down and see it and it's like right in my face, I'll definitely do they full-flight seizure mode thing, too.

No, not flight. FIGHT.

And he was out for blood. I'd swear that moth just told him it just ****ed his mother.

Online Chinguetti

  • The Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 2416
  • Gender: Female
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5411 on: June 20, 2018, 03:31:15 PM »
Same with snapping turtles. "They eat the fish." Uhhhhh, yeah? Some fish. You really think you killing a snapper is going to improve your luck next time you're out on the boat?

People are insane.

It's the same excuse people give for killing sharks and dolphins. I understand the frustration you might have in dealing with any/all of the above, but they're kind of important for the health of the ecosystem (being a good indicator of it).

donovan

  • Guest
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5412 on: June 20, 2018, 03:52:15 PM »
I'm not afraid of bugs or anything at all, and usually will go out of my way to gently pick them up and put them outside. Unless they're like fruit flies or something that are getting all up in my foods.

But, still, if I like, get surprised by something, like a moth is on my shoulder and starts touching my ear and I look down and see it and it's like right in my face, I'll definitely do they full-flight seizure mode thing, too.

No, not flight. FIGHT.

And he was out for blood. I'd swear that moth just told him it just ****ed his mother.

Showing that his squats make him capable of more than just lifting dead weights, perhaps.  But yeah, I see this a lot with kids too, definitely as a way to overcompensate for their fear.

How do I prove to myself and others that I’m not afraid of the butterfly?.... BEAT IT MERCILESSLY WITH A WIFFLE BALL BAT!
« Last Edit: June 20, 2018, 04:01:36 PM by donovan »

Online oglop

  • Hero of Waygookistan
  • *****
  • Posts: 1568
  • Gender: Male
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5413 on: June 20, 2018, 03:56:40 PM »
It does cross my mind that perhaps my students live in a simplified emotional environment where they're not exposed too often to situations that would require them to handle complex emotions, but that's kind of hard to swallow. The fact is they (my students, anyway) have incredibly stable (if risk-averse) family arrangements and living environments, but that kind of stability is largely what a family and good school is good for. Too much of a good thing, perhaps?

Of course my students are younger and the stress of school and social relations tend to pile up in the middle school and high school years. Maybe it just hasn't hit them yet.
yeah, i dunno. sometimes i think that a lot of kids here are pretty sheltered and don't get much life experience (coddled/no responsibility/not allowed to make their own mistakes/etc) and that ends up making them emotionally immature.

i have a 10 year old cousin who is the complete opposite of korean kids. he seems way more mature than korean kids his age. maybe it's because he's given freedom to decide what hobbies he wants, is given responsibility in the house and is allowed to go out and climb/fall out of trees, limited to an hour of video games a week (and happy with it), etc. from my experience, this is the complete opposite of korean kids

i guess my point is that korean kids often feel less 'well-rounded' than kids in the uk/australia who i know, or are family, etc. i think a big part of this is the parenting (and lack thereof)

My older sister and her husband give everything to their kids and in turn they can be a real pain in the ass.  My bro-in-law has a good job and his rationale for spending a fortune on them is because he didn't have that from his parents.  I went home for Christmas a few years ago and was amazed by the stuff they got brought.  My sister also has to have things for them to do, all the time.  They always have to have something planned for the weekend.  My mum complains to me about this as she's of the opinion that kids can be bored, it's not a bad thing, that's how you develop imaginations, in part.  If you've provided everything to keep them occupied all the time, how do they learn to develop emotionally.  Korean kids by middle school and high school have little free time, so they spend time on things that require no movement, their phones.  Who can blame them?  That's the society.  Is it possible to develop emotionally outside of school if you're on your phone the whole time?  Living here and working here for ages, and also being married, I really do get to see emotional reactions that to me, seem really strange, but I'm very curious how they came about.  Is it early childhood, society or just the person?  My wife is scared of absolutely every insect, even butterflies.  When did that happen?  I know a lot of Korean who have a similar phobia.  Is that from not playing outside?  When I go home, I tell my niece that 'Auntie Park is scared of butterflies'.   :shocked:
My wife is also scared of bugs. Even pigeons. It's weird, isn't it. You might be right about the free time thing. It's true for both kids and adults. If you spend your life living with your mum until you're married, then have a baby within a year of that, you're going to have less life experiences. None of my korean friends were taught to be independent. Most of them can't cook or even work the washing machine...

It probably all sounds very condescending, what I wrote. But I feel I grew up emotionally most when I was a teenager and at uni, where I lived with new people, made a lot of dumb mistakes, and did everything by myself, independent of my parents

Re: moths. I also hate moths so I get the guy in the gym

donovan

  • Guest
SUBTHREAD: Bug Battle Stories
« Reply #5414 on: June 20, 2018, 04:17:09 PM »
I walked in to the bathroom yesterday morning and locked eyes with an enormous cockroach scurrying behind the door. We both stood motionless for a what seemed like an hour until I had the wherewithal to reach for the shower head without averting my gaze. I cranked it to the highest heat setting and sprayed the bastard for what must have been five minutes before approaching its unmoving carcass, legs now splayed, with a heap of toilet paper and a rubber glove to flush  it down the toilet.

Offline Kayos

  • Expert Waygook
  • ****
  • Posts: 882
  • Gender: Male
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5415 on: June 21, 2018, 08:35:45 AM »
It does cross my mind that perhaps my students live in a simplified emotional environment where they're not exposed too often to situations that would require them to handle complex emotions, but that's kind of hard to swallow. The fact is they (my students, anyway) have incredibly stable (if risk-averse) family arrangements and living environments, but that kind of stability is largely what a family and good school is good for. Too much of a good thing, perhaps?

Of course my students are younger and the stress of school and social relations tend to pile up in the middle school and high school years. Maybe it just hasn't hit them yet.
yeah, i dunno. sometimes i think that a lot of kids here are pretty sheltered and don't get much life experience (coddled/no responsibility/not allowed to make their own mistakes/etc) and that ends up making them emotionally immature.

i have a 10 year old cousin who is the complete opposite of korean kids. he seems way more mature than korean kids his age. maybe it's because he's given freedom to decide what hobbies he wants, is given responsibility in the house and is allowed to go out and climb/fall out of trees, limited to an hour of video games a week (and happy with it), etc. from my experience, this is the complete opposite of korean kids

i guess my point is that korean kids often feel less 'well-rounded' than kids in the uk/australia who i know, or are family, etc. i think a big part of this is the parenting (and lack thereof)

My older sister and her husband give everything to their kids and in turn they can be a real pain in the ass.  My bro-in-law has a good job and his rationale for spending a fortune on them is because he didn't have that from his parents.  I went home for Christmas a few years ago and was amazed by the stuff they got brought.  My sister also has to have things for them to do, all the time.  They always have to have something planned for the weekend.  My mum complains to me about this as she's of the opinion that kids can be bored, it's not a bad thing, that's how you develop imaginations, in part.  If you've provided everything to keep them occupied all the time, how do they learn to develop emotionally.  Korean kids by middle school and high school have little free time, so they spend time on things that require no movement, their phones.  Who can blame them?  That's the society.  Is it possible to develop emotionally outside of school if you're on your phone the whole time?  Living here and working here for ages, and also being married, I really do get to see emotional reactions that to me, seem really strange, but I'm very curious how they came about.  Is it early childhood, society or just the person?  My wife is scared of absolutely every insect, even butterflies.  When did that happen?  I know a lot of Korean who have a similar phobia.  Is that from not playing outside?  When I go home, I tell my niece that 'Auntie Park is scared of butterflies'.   :shocked:

My younger half sister got spoiled rotten by my ex-step father (her father). Like, almost anything she wanted growing up, she got. I remember 1 year, my younger brother (luckily, my ex-step father isn't his father) had a birthday, my sister demanded that she gets gifts too, because its not fair that she didn't get anything. So he went out and spent like $800 on my sister, wrapped the gifts up, put my brothers name on the card, came back and let my brother open the gifts, and said "They are all for your sister."

She basically grew up to be the most entitled person I have ever met (I've seen worse on the internet though). And even though she is about 20 now (I try to have very little to do with my sister now, so can never remember her age), she literally has the intelligence of an 8 or 9 year old. She done terribly in school AND her father rewarded her for it.
If you say no to her, she will still throw a massive temper tantrum like a child. Including crying, stamping her feet, and flailing around on the floor. I think being overly spoiled, leads to, or at least can lead to, stunting emotional growth too.

Offline AvecPommesFrites

  • Expert Waygook
  • ****
  • Posts: 745
  • Gender: Female
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5416 on: June 21, 2018, 09:25:10 AM »
A look back at the waygook archives. Big shout out to JejuJohn77. Hilarious. http://www.waygook.org/index.php?topic=109589.0
Can I refill your eggnog for you? Get you something to eat? Drive you out to the middle of nowhere and leave you for dead?

Offline yirj17

  • The Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 2782
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5417 on: June 21, 2018, 01:16:55 PM »
Playing a wee gig this weekend.  Been a long while since I've performed, so a bit nervous  :-[

Gonna be the electric violin's first time out!  And melodica and ocarina cause why not go all out  :laugh:

Setlist is nerdtastic~

Offline #basedcowboyshirt

  • Expert Waygook
  • ****
  • Posts: 545
  • Gender: Male
  • My ring is a mansion.
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5418 on: June 21, 2018, 01:37:19 PM »
Playing a wee gig this weekend.  Been a long while since I've performed, so a bit nervous  :-[

Gonna be the electric violin's first time out!  And melodica and ocarina cause why not go all out  :laugh:

Setlist is nerdtastic~

Have a big fun.

Offline kobayashi

  • Expert Waygook
  • ****
  • Posts: 963
  • Gender: Male
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5419 on: June 21, 2018, 02:20:48 PM »
A look back at the waygook archives. Big shout out to JejuJohn77. Hilarious. http://www.waygook.org/index.php?topic=109589.0

strong post by Mr John Jeju there  :laugh:

will the mods on here ever get it? there have been soooo many complaints about them over the years.

funnily enough, good old DMT (DeMartino) always manages to evade getting any type of warning at all, despite blatantly violating the ToS on numerous occasions. on of his most recent posts being a direct insult against another member. i'll report the post and let's see what happens, my guess is nothing at all.