October 19, 2018, 02:14:47 AM


Author Topic: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.  (Read 787154 times)

Offline travelinpantsgirl

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #4480 on: November 21, 2017, 08:42:41 AM »
If you had the inside scoop that someone was leaving a sweet gig and there was an old posting up on a job board for that school with the same hiring contact information, would you apply before they posted that person's job, to slide in early? Or do you think the school would look upon that negatively? The person leaving can't really help in terms of influence as they weren't there very long.

I'd absolutely apply for it.  If the person is leaving and there is an opportunity to jump in before they advertise the job then that's your good luck and others' bad luck. 

I did something similar a couple of years back to get my current job.  As my middle school job was being phased out, I thought I'd message my Korean Engish teacher friend at the high school to see if the current native teacher would renew.  She said they weren't, so I said I wanted that job.  She talked to the principal and it was agreed before they advertised it. 

I actually did another similar thing a year before that when I was in my elementary job and they were opening up just one middle school position in my city for the following year.  I talked to another Korean English teacher and told her I was the best person for the job so she called the supervisor and said as much.  The supervisor wasn't sure as they wanted to advertise it, but then called her back a few hours later to say I could have it.

'Sneaking' in before they advertise shows initiative and forward planning. 

Japan not on the cards, or are you justing keeping your options open?
I wasnít able to save the amount I wanted to in order to get the student visa, so I thought it would be best to stay for one more year. I am also applying to certain good schools in Japan but Iíd rather just go to language school first than struggle. Anyway this sweet gig is too good to pass up but now the situation has gotten more complicated because I asked for a raise at my current job fully expecting it to not come through because it never has before and so I was all set to say today Iím not renewing and now this throws a wrench in. Iím probably still not going to renew but that does make it harder to say so.
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Offline Dave Stepz

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #4481 on: November 21, 2017, 10:10:05 AM »
If you had the inside scoop that someone was leaving a sweet gig and there was an old posting up on a job board for that school with the same hiring contact information, would you apply before they posted that person's job, to slide in early? Or do you think the school would look upon that negatively? The person leaving can't really help in terms of influence as they weren't there very long.

I'd absolutely apply for it.  If the person is leaving and there is an opportunity to jump in before they advertise the job then that's your good luck and others' bad luck. 

I did something similar a couple of years back to get my current job.  As my middle school job was being phased out, I thought I'd message my Korean Engish teacher friend at the high school to see if the current native teacher would renew.  She said they weren't, so I said I wanted that job.  She talked to the principal and it was agreed before they advertised it. 

I actually did another similar thing a year before that when I was in my elementary job and they were opening up just one middle school position in my city for the following year.  I talked to another Korean English teacher and told her I was the best person for the job so she called the supervisor and said as much.  The supervisor wasn't sure as they wanted to advertise it, but then called her back a few hours later to say I could have it.

'Sneaking' in before they advertise shows initiative and forward planning. 

Japan not on the cards, or are you justing keeping your options open?
I wasnít able to save the amount I wanted to in order to get the student visa, so I thought it would be best to stay for one more year. I am also applying to certain good schools in Japan but Iíd rather just go to language school first than struggle. Anyway this sweet gig is too good to pass up but now the situation has gotten more complicated because I asked for a raise at my current job fully expecting it to not come through because it never has before and so I was all set to say today Iím not renewing and now this throws a wrench in. Iím probably still not going to renew but that does make it harder to say so.

Tough one, especially with your other school coming back in with a raise.  Still it is good to have those options, even if Japan may get put off for another year.  Even if nothing comes up you can stick around at your school now which you've said you like. 

I was kind of curious about the foreign language high schools this week as my student participated in a national speech contest which had a lot of entrants from the foreign language high schools around Korea.  Actually, I was looking for dirt because my student didn't get a prize but she thought something was a little fishy as the organisation who runs the contest has 'associations' with Lincoln House schools in Korea.  The thing is my student said there were some really good speeches but the majority of prize winners came from Lincoln House high schools (there are a few in Korea).  I know Korea is dodgy as hell so I'm sure there is something about them wanting to give to their students.  I'm doing some more digging before I write complaint emails to said organisation.

Anyway, I got sidetracked, so while looking I saw that a load of these high schools have German, Japanese, Spanish teachers etc and am pretty sure they're the perfect gigs to have in Korea.  Excellent students who have a motivation to do well and with the ability to converse easily in other languages.  It's only a shame that Swedish is not taught in these schools as I'd be a shoe in. 

Offline Mister Tim

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #4482 on: November 21, 2017, 11:17:26 AM »
I wasnít able to save the amount I wanted to in order to get the student visa

Was it an amount you set for yourself, or an amount the Japanese government set that you need to have in order to sponsor yourself? I'm interested in doing the same thing, so it'd be nice to know what sort of figure I should be shooting for.

Also, any idea how to prove that you've got the money? Will they take bank statements in KRW, or will I have to find a way to get an official statement of the amount I've got in a Korean bank in dollars instead?

Offline travelinpantsgirl

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #4483 on: November 21, 2017, 12:17:19 PM »
I wasnít able to save the amount I wanted to in order to get the student visa

Was it an amount you set for yourself, or an amount the Japanese government set that you need to have in order to sponsor yourself? I'm interested in doing the same thing, so it'd be nice to know what sort of figure I should be shooting for.

Also, any idea how to prove that you've got the money? Will they take bank statements in KRW, or will I have to find a way to get an official statement of the amount I've got in a Korean bank in dollars instead?
If you want to self sponsor and guarantee your chances of getting that COE, you need somewhere around $30,000 USD in savings. If you have someone with savings that is willing to sponsor you then it's less of an issue. I don't have that, so it's all on me. Also, realizing I am sick of commuting, in order to avoid living out in the boonies, I want to save more so I can live IN Tokyo and not go broke.
I am not sure about the proof, but I think Korean bank statements are okay, but don't hold me to that.
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Offline Mister Tim

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #4484 on: November 21, 2017, 01:31:36 PM »

If you want to self sponsor and guarantee your chances of getting that COE, you need somewhere around $30,000 USD in savings. If you have someone with savings that is willing to sponsor you then it's less of an issue. I don't have that, so it's all on me. Also, realizing I am sick of commuting, in order to avoid living out in the boonies, I want to save more so I can live IN Tokyo and not go broke.
I am not sure about the proof, but I think Korean bank statements are okay, but don't hold me to that.

Hm. I don't quite have that much set aside now, but like you I intend to stay another year, so I ought to be able to get my saving up there comfortably enough. I suppose the question is whether I'll be able to do it by the time I apply for the student visa, which will be months before the end of my next contract. I'll also have 7 years of pension and severance to pad my bank account, but those won't be in my account until after I leave, so they won't help much in the visa application process, haha.

I was looking at the locations of the schools listed on Gaijinpot and then looking at apartment rental costs in those locations, and I don't think I'll even consider Tokyo an option  :laugh:. Even with $30k in the bank, after paying for the school itself (which you have to do in full before starting, afaik), I don't think I'd have enough to live there. Kyoto and Osaka are probably out of it for me, too. I'm thinking of somewhere smaller and cheaper but still interesting, like Nagano.

Fingers crossed you're right about Korean bank statements. Finances and finance-related things always make me a bit nervous. I've already been looking into banking options in Japan that offer overseas remittance and how to go about setting that up, so I'll have once less thing to worry about.

Along those lines, I'm looking in to solutions for the phone/bank/apartment problem immigrants to Japan often face, ie You can't get a bank account without a Japanese phone number, you can't get a Japanese phone number without a Japanese address, and you can't get a Japanese apartment without a Japanese bank account, or some other such circular, self-defeating nonsense. I've been reading about workarounds, so it won't be impossible, but it will be a PITA.  :sad:

Offline Dave Stepz

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #4485 on: November 23, 2017, 08:16:54 AM »
Chungnam, 8:40am, lightning, then thunder then heavy snowfall.  Lucky all the university entrance test students had to be at school at 8:10am.  Earthquake then snow. Is someone trying to tell the government to scrap this awful test?  :laugh:

Offline HaLo3

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #4486 on: November 23, 2017, 10:03:06 AM »
Ran home during a break to go throw my roast in the slow cooker so it will be ready in time for my Thanksgiving party tonight. Accidentally burned my finger while searing it off. On the plus side, the seasoning is delicious.

Offline Dave Stepz

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #4487 on: November 24, 2017, 08:45:13 AM »
Is it only me that thinks lightning, thunder and snow is strange?  Lightning, thunder and rain, ok.  But snow?  Never in my life have I seen that.

Offline Dave Stepz

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #4488 on: November 24, 2017, 09:13:30 AM »
Level 3 high school students are having their photos taken outside today for the graduation album, and it's snowing its ass off.  This always happens.  Why don't they take the pictures a bit earlier in the year?

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #4489 on: November 24, 2017, 09:42:33 AM »
I saw a woman who I used to work with, for the first time in a year or so. She has had something done to her face.
I had always thought she was attractive, especially for her age (early 40s) with 3 kids.

As soon as I saw her my brain short circuted. Like I couldn't put my finger on what had happened, my brain was just flashing "error". She's done something to her eye area and lower half of her face. But it's not overt. But the ratios of her face are all skeewiff.

It's strange how that happens with some plastic surgery. Some sort of uncanny valley reaction. Lots of the females on TV here, they aren't ugly and most would class them as beautiful, but there is something offputting. They are pretty, but there is no attraction. Like my brain is saying "yip, but nope"
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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #4490 on: November 24, 2017, 11:11:41 AM »
I saw a woman who I used to work with, for the first time in a year or so. She has had something done to her face.
I had always thought she was attractive, especially for her age (early 40s) with 3 kids.

As soon as I saw her my brain short circuted. Like I couldn't put my finger on what had happened, my brain was just flashing "error". She's done something to her eye area and lower half of her face. But it's not overt. But the ratios of her face are all skeewiff.

It's strange how that happens with some plastic surgery. Some sort of uncanny valley reaction. Lots of the females on TV here, they aren't ugly and most would class them as beautiful, but there is something offputting. They are pretty, but there is no attraction. Like my brain is saying "yip, but nope"

I find that I catch myself admiring these ladies, not as potential mates, but as works of art. It is the artistís skill I am admiring, not the womanís beauty.
« Last Edit: November 24, 2017, 08:28:05 PM by JNM »

Offline yirj17

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #4491 on: November 24, 2017, 11:57:46 AM »
I need to learn about amps. I know nothing about the electric side of instruments.

Offline yirj17

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #4492 on: November 27, 2017, 11:47:14 AM »
Picked up a wee practice amp (though I believe it will also work for accompanying acoustic guitar) and a basic effects strip. Life ain't bad

Offline koreakorea

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #4493 on: November 28, 2017, 08:26:32 AM »
Can someone humour me and briefly explain how teaching in an elementary school works because I just can't get my head around it.  I have basic assumptions but my confusion mainly comes from reading posts like - "Elementary, teaching alone, no coteacher..."

I assume that most of the students have never encountered English before so they literally don't know anything (aside from "hello").  Is that right?  So...how in the world can you teach them anything without Korean translation?  I mean, if you're teaching alone, how do you do this?

Do elementary textbooks have Korean in them?  How do the students know what's going on without translation?

I assume you have target expressions like "How are you?" or "This is a pencil".  How can you possibly communicate the grammatical function of "how, are, this, is" etc without a Korean translation?

As a side note, I've read posts from NETs who claim they "took the student aside and explained to him exactly what he did wrong and why it was wrong" etc.  How are these elementary students understanding this??!!!!  Or (as I suspect) there's a Korean teacher translating word for word which is conveniently left out of the NET's story.

Sorry for the rambly post but it makes my head hurt thinking about this stuff.

Offline Dave Stepz

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #4494 on: November 28, 2017, 08:42:45 AM »
Can someone humour me and briefly explain how teaching in an elementary school works because I just can't get my head around it.  I have basic assumptions but my confusion mainly comes from reading posts like - "Elementary, teaching alone, no coteacher..."

I assume that most of the students have never encountered English before so they literally don't know anything (aside from "hello").  Is that right?  So...how in the world can you teach them anything without Korean translation?  I mean, if you're teaching alone, how do you do this?

Do elementary textbooks have Korean in them?  How do the students know what's going on without translation?

I assume you have target expressions like "How are you?" or "This is a pencil".  How can you possibly communicate the grammatical function of "how, are, this, is" etc without a Korean translation?

As a side note, I've read posts from NETs who claim they "took the student aside and explained to him exactly what he did wrong and why it was wrong" etc.  How are these elementary students understanding this??!!!!  Or (as I suspect) there's a Korean teacher translating word for word which is conveniently left out of the NET's story.

Sorry for the rambly post but it makes my head hurt thinking about this stuff.

In all my time here, I've found native teachers in elementary to be the most pointless waste of money, especially if you're a new teacher with no Korean speaking skills.  Like you say, you need to be able to communicate with students but most have never got past from the basic 'hello' as more than that needs more explanation in Korean.  I found that you can really only teach vocabulary with pictures and games linked with it, if you are a new teacher who's unfortunately 'teaching alone'.  By middle and high, the students have character and most have realised that they need to knuckle down for studying, which makes things so much easier.  Elementary is just fun time, and you notice when they graduate to middle school, there is a shock because they actually have to do something and they have more difficult tests.  The jump is significant. 

Offline denimdaze

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #4495 on: November 28, 2017, 08:46:06 AM »
Can someone humour me and briefly explain how teaching in an elementary school works because I just can't get my head around it.  I have basic assumptions but my confusion mainly comes from reading posts like - "Elementary, teaching alone, no coteacher..."

I assume that most of the students have never encountered English before so they literally don't know anything (aside from "hello").  Is that right?  So...how in the world can you teach them anything without Korean translation?  I mean, if you're teaching alone, how do you do this?

Do elementary textbooks have Korean in them?  How do the students know what's going on without translation?

I assume you have target expressions like "How are you?" or "This is a pencil".  How can you possibly communicate the grammatical function of "how, are, this, is" etc without a Korean translation?

As a side note, I've read posts from NETs who claim they "took the student aside and explained to him exactly what he did wrong and why it was wrong" etc.  How are these elementary students understanding this??!!!!  Or (as I suspect) there's a Korean teacher translating word for word which is conveniently left out of the NET's story.

Sorry for the rambly post but it makes my head hurt thinking about this stuff.

In all my time here, I've found native teachers in elementary to be the most pointless waste of money, especially if you're a new teacher with no Korean speaking skills.  Like you say, you need to be able to communicate with students but most have never got past from the basic 'hello' as more than that needs more explanation in Korean.  I found that you can really only teach vocabulary with pictures and games linked with it, if you are a new teacher who's unfortunately 'teaching alone'.  By middle and high, the students have character and most have realised that they need to knuckle down for studying, which makes things so much easier.  Elementary is just fun time, and you notice when they graduate to middle school, there is a shock because they actually have to do something and they have more difficult tests.  The jump is significant.

I teach third grade elementary alone and I find it frustrating.  This semester is the first time the class has studied with a native teacher, and I'm on my own.  I do a lot of TPR and drill with them and make it as active and fun as possible.  It is what it is.

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #4496 on: November 28, 2017, 08:47:14 AM »
Can someone humour me and briefly explain how teaching in an elementary school works because I just can't get my head around it.  I have basic assumptions but my confusion mainly comes from reading posts like - "Elementary, teaching alone, no coteacher..."

I assume that most of the students have never encountered English before so they literally don't know anything (aside from "hello").  Is that right?  So...how in the world can you teach them anything without Korean translation?  I mean, if you're teaching alone, how do you do this?

Do elementary textbooks have Korean in them?  How do the students know what's going on without translation?

I assume you have target expressions like "How are you?" or "This is a pencil".  How can you possibly communicate the grammatical function of "how, are, this, is" etc without a Korean translation?

As a side note, I've read posts from NETs who claim they "took the student aside and explained to him exactly what he did wrong and why it was wrong" etc.  How are these elementary students understanding this??!!!!  Or (as I suspect) there's a Korean teacher translating word for word which is conveniently left out of the NET's story.

Sorry for the rambly post but it makes my head hurt thinking about this stuff.

I took French immersion and there was no translation. That said,

-English and French are much more similar
-I was 5, ready to soak it in.

HOWEVER, you know what I did? I shut the hell up and listened. I didn't act out because I knew I was out of my element.  And there was real shame in being an asshole who disrupted the class. I've been in public school for 3 years and have never seen a student sent to the principal's office. I was deathly afraid of the principal talking to my parents in a negative fashion. 

My co-teacher keeps asking me, "Well what games did you play in French class?" Uhhhhh, Bescherelle writing for 100 times? We didn't play, we shut up and learned the language. Parisians might make fun of my Quebecois/Franco-Ontarian accent, but they know that my language skills are on point.
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Offline oglop

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #4497 on: November 28, 2017, 09:03:32 AM »
it's strange how english study has become 'game time' in korea. parents and kids expect english to always be fun. is there the same expectation for other subjects, such as maths or science?

Offline Dave Stepz

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #4498 on: November 28, 2017, 09:10:50 AM »
Can someone humour me and briefly explain how teaching in an elementary school works because I just can't get my head around it.  I have basic assumptions but my confusion mainly comes from reading posts like - "Elementary, teaching alone, no coteacher..."

I assume that most of the students have never encountered English before so they literally don't know anything (aside from "hello").  Is that right?  So...how in the world can you teach them anything without Korean translation?  I mean, if you're teaching alone, how do you do this?

Do elementary textbooks have Korean in them?  How do the students know what's going on without translation?

I assume you have target expressions like "How are you?" or "This is a pencil".  How can you possibly communicate the grammatical function of "how, are, this, is" etc without a Korean translation?

As a side note, I've read posts from NETs who claim they "took the student aside and explained to him exactly what he did wrong and why it was wrong" etc.  How are these elementary students understanding this??!!!!  Or (as I suspect) there's a Korean teacher translating word for word which is conveniently left out of the NET's story.

Sorry for the rambly post but it makes my head hurt thinking about this stuff.

In all my time here, I've found native teachers in elementary to be the most pointless waste of money, especially if you're a new teacher with no Korean speaking skills.  Like you say, you need to be able to communicate with students but most have never got past from the basic 'hello' as more than that needs more explanation in Korean.  I found that you can really only teach vocabulary with pictures and games linked with it, if you are a new teacher who's unfortunately 'teaching alone'.  By middle and high, the students have character and most have realised that they need to knuckle down for studying, which makes things so much easier.  Elementary is just fun time, and you notice when they graduate to middle school, there is a shock because they actually have to do something and they have more difficult tests.  The jump is significant.

I teach third grade elementary alone and I find it frustrating.  This semester is the first time the class has studied with a native teacher, and I'm on my own.  I do a lot of TPR and drill with them and make it as active and fun as possible.  It is what it is.

Right, not only for you but for the kids.  You may be lucky and have a few students who've been to hagwons their whole life and can understand, but then your class will be too easy for them as you aim for the mean in the class.  Keeping them focused and on point gets easier if you vary the activities and don't keep them too long on one thing.  'Uppers and downers' are the way to teach elementary kids.  But they really don't need too much teaching in elementary school to pass the tests they do, and a native teacher going off on a tangent would be considered a waste of time.  If you are stuck with a strict co-teacher, as I've been on one occassion, you're completely useless and it's a horrible experience.  If you have a more open-minded principal and teachers, and can prepare whatever, it makes so much difference. 

I took French immersion and there was no translation. That said,

-English and French are much more similar
-I was 5, ready to soak it in.

HOWEVER, you know what I did? I shut the hell up and listened. I didn't act out because I knew I was out of my element.  And there was real shame in being an asshole who disrupted the class. I've been in public school for 3 years and have never seen a student sent to the principal's office. I was deathly afraid of the principal talking to my parents in a negative fashion. 

My co-teacher keeps asking me, "Well what games did you play in French class?" Uhhhhh, Bescherelle writing for 100 times? We didn't play, we shut up and learned the language. Parisians might make fun of my Quebecois/Franco-Ontarian accent, but they know that my language skills are on point.

I'm not sure if your language learning was like ours where your grade was 25% speaking, 25% listening, 25% writing and 25% reading.  So if you want a good grade, you've got to be good at all the aspects.  I'm pretty sure that makes you want to pay particular attention to everything. 

I heard from a co-teacher that from 2018 Seoul Uni is using English as part of its interview process for all the subjects.  This year I helped two of my students for their 'sushi' interview.  One wants to study Global Hotel Management and the other Nursing.  Seems to be enough of an incentive to really push on with the speaking side of English and make it a more integral part of middle and high school learning, rather than just its 10% in a simple speaking test.

Offline Dave Stepz

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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #4499 on: November 28, 2017, 09:17:04 AM »
it's strange how english study has become 'game time' in korea. parents and kids expect english to always be fun. is there the same expectation for other subjects, such as maths or science?

In my high school, the maths teacher has 100% Teacher Talking Time.  It is shut up and listen time, the students look so bored.  I'm sure this is not good, but then I'm sure there is so much maths to teach that students are going to fall behind easily.  In middle school, there was more of a basis on teams together and the teacher giving problems to solve between themselves.  I liked that as stronger students could help the weaker students, and they'd be less likely to fall behind. 

If I remember my secondary school science classes, it involved filling my friend's pencil case with gas and blowing it up, or running a high current through a straightened paper clip and cutting things with the hot wire.  Fun...  Korean students don't seem to do a lot of 'experiments', like that.  :-[