January 23, 2019, 06:02:18 PM


Author Topic: Showing movies during Winter Camps: is it considered 'lazy' teaching?  (Read 22172 times)

Offline amores

  • Veteran
  • **
  • Posts: 117
  • Gender: Female
Re: Showing movies during Winter Camps: is it considered 'lazy' teaching?
« Reply #20 on: December 13, 2013, 11:54:14 AM »
Camps are taken pretty seriously at my school, and they're expected to be educational. That being said, my coteacher decides most of what we're doing and on the last day of the 5-day camp, we'll watch a movie. That seems to be what they do ever year as a closing activity. I don't think we do anything educational with the movie; just watch.

Offline yfb

  • Expert Waygook
  • ****
  • Posts: 858
Re: Showing movies during Winter Camps: is it considered 'lazy' teaching?
« Reply #21 on: December 13, 2013, 11:54:14 AM »

Those of you who say camps are "stupid" and "lame" you should be ashamed of yourselves. What is your reason for being here? Sounds to me that you don't care a lick about the students who have to attend these camps and just want to be paid for doing nothing.



Get off your high horse. This isn't a volunteer job - you and I are here to make money. Camps amount to a whole lot of extra work without extra compensation. NO OTHER COUNTRY has the camp system like Korea does. This setup is specifically designed to make sure YOUR vacation is LESS than the non-contract Korean teachers'.

You also make it sound like these camps are mandatory for the students - they're voluntary. Yes, I know the contract states that we can be called on to teach extra work, etc. etc. don't sign it, etc. While it's better than the typical hagwon contract, it's still worse than a uni contract.

If you prefer to work for free and buy materials out of the goodness of your heart, be my guest. But don't insinuate that wanting to take vacation DURING VACATION makes us lazy.

Offline acousticr

  • Expert Waygook
  • ****
  • Posts: 503
  • GEPIK, rural elementary.
Re: Showing movies during Winter Camps: is it considered 'lazy' teaching?
« Reply #22 on: December 13, 2013, 12:12:53 PM »

Those of you who say camps are "stupid" and "lame" you should be ashamed of yourselves. What is your reason for being here? Sounds to me that you don't care a lick about the students who have to attend these camps and just want to be paid for doing nothing.



Get off your high horse. This isn't a volunteer job - you and I are here to make money. Camps amount to a whole lot of extra work without extra compensation. NO OTHER COUNTRY has the camp system like Korea does. This setup is specifically designed to make sure YOUR vacation is LESS than the non-contract Korean teachers'.

You also make it sound like these camps are mandatory for the students - they're voluntary. Yes, I know the contract states that we can be called on to teach extra work, etc. etc. don't sign it, etc. While it's better than the typical hagwon contract, it's still worse than a uni contract.

If you prefer to work for free and buy materials out of the goodness of your heart, be my guest. But don't insinuate that wanting to take vacation DURING VACATION makes us lazy.

We're still drawing a salary during camp; this isn't volunteer work and this isn't working for free. What the camp is "designed" to do is to keep the students busy and the parents happy, and, yes, keep us busy.

It's not that much extra work. In fact, it doesn't even count as extra work unless you're working more classes during vacation than you would during the semester - most of us have contracts that say we will work fewer teaching hours during vacation. Yes, it's open curriculum instead of textbooks, so there can be more prep involved, and no, you may not have that much of a budget, but considering all of the deskwarming we do, it really isn't a lot to ask of us. You don't have to do a big fancy thing, and you don't have to go out and spend a lot of money. This isn't open class, this is camp, and casual is fine. With all of the resources at our disposal, this really doesn't have to be difficult at all.

I've complained myself - the jump from 15 days with three groups to 18 days with two groups was pretty daunting at first, but I'm here to teach and I've worked it out. Other countries do have camps, but they call them summer school. It's handled differently, yes, but there is still schooling during vacation in lots of areas.

If you prefer to work for free and buy materials out of the goodness of your heart, be my guest. But don't insinuate that wanting to take vacation DURING VACATION makes us lazy.

It's not your vacation, and it's not wanting to have time off that makes any of us lazy. It's copping out completely and trying to get paid for not working that makes an NET lazy.
$10 off your first order at iHerb.com with this code: BPC852

Offline keirdre

  • Veteran
  • **
  • Posts: 111
  • Gender: Male
Re: Showing movies during Winter Camps: is it considered 'lazy' teaching?
« Reply #23 on: December 13, 2013, 01:42:54 PM »
This setup is specifically designed to make sure YOUR vacation is LESS than the non-contract Korean teachers'.

I think it's designed to give parents somewhere to send their children during vacation times.  It's particularly beneficial for low-income families.  It's a child minding service that the parents expect.  It's not specifically designed to make sure that our vacation is reduced, at all.

Offline loswillyams

  • Super Waygook
  • ***
  • Posts: 475
  • Gender: Male
Re: Showing movies during Winter Camps: is it considered 'lazy' teaching?
« Reply #24 on: December 13, 2013, 01:53:09 PM »
This setup is specifically designed to make sure YOUR vacation is LESS than the non-contract Korean teachers'.

I think it's designed to give parents somewhere to send their children during vacation times.  It's particularly beneficial for low-income families.  It's a child minding service that the parents expect.  It's not specifically designed to make sure that our vacation is reduced, at all.

Agreed.
The camp rosters at BOTH of my schools only have 1 or 2 kids who attend a hagwon. The rest don't go and are my mid to low level English class students. Camp is a great opportunity to help them catch up on vocabulary and build a positive rapport with me. It helps set the tone for the incoming semester.

Offline yojoe

  • Adventurer
  • *
  • Posts: 63
  • Gender: Male
  • "Knowing is half the battle."
Re: Showing movies during Winter Camps: is it considered 'lazy' teaching?
« Reply #25 on: December 13, 2013, 01:54:53 PM »
I've always shown a movie, half on Wed, the rest on Thurs. I have three weeks of winter camp, that's a lot of extra work for me for kids who would rather not be there. They all go to hagwon too. So, the movie is a reward and a way of humanizing the education process. They're kids, not robots, or soldiers.

I have been at this MS for three years and haven't had any complaints about my camps. I also provide tea every morning for the kids and let them bring snacks everyday, especially for the movies. This year I will pop popcorn for them. And Friday is pizza day. I have all the kids bring 3K, and the Korean co-t gets the pizza for us.

Don't get me wrong, we work. I feel like my camps get better each time, but the movie is somehow important; a camp enhancer. To keep the doubters happy, we have a discussion the following morning and the kids write about it in their journals.

Joe

Offline yojoe

  • Adventurer
  • *
  • Posts: 63
  • Gender: Male
  • "Knowing is half the battle."
Re: Showing movies during Winter Camps: is it considered 'lazy' teaching?
« Reply #26 on: December 13, 2013, 02:01:24 PM »
And yes, camp is baby sitting, but we make the most of it.

YJ

Offline BTeacher

  • Expert Waygook
  • ****
  • Posts: 756
  • Gender: Male
Re: Showing movies during Winter Camps: is it considered 'lazy' teaching?
« Reply #27 on: December 13, 2013, 03:00:48 PM »
I always show a movie on the last day of camp. No worksheets, no analysis, we just watch a movie because it's fun.

It's hard enough trying to get students to "study" during the regular school year, so I don't even attempt it during camp/vacation time, (unless I'm told to do so, which has only happened once.)

This isn't to say they aren't doing worthwhile activities--science experiments, art & craft projects, sports/physical activities, playing games.

Unless the school gives me a clear objective--"teach phonics to this group of low level students"--then my aim is to make camps fun and memorable to the students.



 


Online fishead

  • Hero of Waygookistan
  • *****
  • Posts: 1108
  • Gender: Male
Re: Showing movies during Winter Camps: is it considered 'lazy' teaching?
« Reply #28 on: December 13, 2013, 03:12:42 PM »

Those of you who say camps are "stupid" and "lame" you should be ashamed of yourselves. What is your reason for being here? Sounds to me that you don't care a lick about the students who have to attend these camps and just want to be paid for doing nothing.



Get off your high horse. This isn't a volunteer job - you and I are here to make money. Camps amount to a whole lot of extra work without extra compensation. NO OTHER COUNTRY has the camp system like Korea does. This setup is specifically designed to make sure YOUR vacation is LESS than the non-contract Korean teachers'.

You also make it sound like these camps are mandatory for the students - they're voluntary. Yes, I know the contract states that we can be called on to teach extra work, etc. etc. don't sign it, etc. While it's better than the typical hagwon contract, it's still worse than a uni contract.

If you prefer to work for free and buy materials out of the goodness of your heart, be my guest. But don't insinuate that wanting to take vacation DURING VACATION makes us lazy.

We're still drawing a salary during camp; this isn't volunteer work and this isn't working for free. What the camp is "designed" to do is to keep the students busy and the parents happy, and, yes, keep us busy.

It's not that much extra work. In fact, it doesn't even count as extra work unless you're working more classes during vacation than you would during the semester - most of us have contracts that say we will work fewer teaching hours during vacation. Yes, it's open curriculum instead of textbooks, so there can be more prep involved, and no, you may not have that much of a budget, but considering all of the deskwarming we do, it really isn't a lot to ask of us. You don't have to do a big fancy thing, and you don't have to go out and spend a lot of money. This isn't open class, this is camp, and casual is fine. With all of the resources at our disposal, this really doesn't have to be difficult at all.

I've complained myself - the jump from 15 days with three groups to 18 days with two groups was pretty daunting at first, but I'm here to teach and I've worked it out. Other countries do have camps, but they call them summer school. It's handled differently, yes, but there is still schooling during vacation in lots of areas.

If you prefer to work for free and buy materials out of the goodness of your heart, be my guest. But don't insinuate that wanting to take vacation DURING VACATION makes us lazy.

It's not your vacation, and it's not wanting to have time off that makes any of us lazy. It's copping out completely and trying to get paid for not working that makes an NET lazy.

We used to get paid a bonus to do camps however this was at a time when people bragged about showing Simpsons video's during regular classes and got drunk and destroyed  hotel rooms during orientations. It's also economical there are a lot more economic refugees in the market. I make a real effort to have a good camp. It's OK to have a movie day. Just don't make your whole camp a joke.

Offline ashe1590

  • Super Waygook
  • ***
  • Posts: 428
  • Gender: Female
Re: Showing movies during Winter Camps: is it considered 'lazy' teaching?
« Reply #29 on: December 16, 2013, 08:32:36 AM »
Thanks for all the input guys. It seems like this is quite a controversial topic. I might talk to my coteacher and ask his thoughts/ feelings on it. We have quite an open relationship and he is really helpful so I think i'll be able to test the waters and bounce some ideas off him. Perhaps I'll suggest showing one movie and basing my camp off that and fill it in with related activities (I love the puppet making idea, it was great).

I love my school and I love my kids so this is definitely not about taking the easy road, it's just a bit daunting trying to plan a cohesive lesson for that amount of time. Like I said I have never done a camp before, and a lot of it does seem to be people trying to 'kill time'.

The other issue I have is that I have complete freedom in my classes and I get to teacher whatever I want to my kids. My role is more 'make English fun' and I am not involved in textbook classes, so a lot of camp suggestions I have already done in 'regular' classes (we've had murder mystery lessons, food lessons, KPop lessons, etc, etc). I want to make my camp as fun as possible for the students, but considering what we've already done I am struggling to come up with fresh ideas even after browsing this website.

Offline loswillyams

  • Super Waygook
  • ***
  • Posts: 475
  • Gender: Male
Re: Showing movies during Winter Camps: is it considered 'lazy' teaching?
« Reply #30 on: December 16, 2013, 08:52:25 AM »
There's nothing wrong with doing an old activity again. I find that repeating exercises that we've done in class is beneficial because they spend less time worrying about the mechanics of the activity and more time engaging in the language.

"killing time" with camp is a terrible way to approach it - and I dont' think you are. Camp is a great opportunity to do some actual, real, fun teaching.

One thing I've done in the past - and will do again - is have kids make the materials that I hang in the room and put up on my walls. So all the alphabet trains, "hello how are you?" signs, classroom vocab posters, rules, calendars- those are all made by the kids in my summer / winter camps and then I just laminate them. Parents LOVE to see that stuff during their open classes, and students like to see it.

Another easy cheat is to have the kids make the activity materials after you model it for them. For example, I'm doing a scavenger hunt in one my schools, after the kids make their way through my list, I'll have their teams make their own scavenger list to trade with other teams. It's minimum prep, a lot of practice, and it's engaging for them.

Offline gialian

  • Waygookin
  • *
  • Posts: 13
  • Gender: Female
Re: Showing movies during Winter Camps: is it considered 'lazy' teaching?
« Reply #31 on: December 16, 2013, 03:51:48 PM »
I personally don't see anything wrong with showing movies during camp, as long as the movie has a purpose. You're teaching a concept or a cultural thing. You've discussed some of it beforehand so it's a more active experience. You have checkpoints, either verbally or in written form.

And honestly, if you're doing a Disney theme, it's hard not to do that without showing a film, or at least lots of videos of songs.

But as always, I would say, if you're hesitant, ask your coteacher(s). They'll probably have a better sense of how it would fly at your school.

And it looks like you're doing a lot more than just showing videos, so I think it should be fine.

I personally think that if it engages the students in the language/culture, go for it... because at least from my experience so far - that's what it seems like we're hear for, just another outlet to interact with English speakers and the cultures we come from.

Good luck with winter camp! Let us know how it goes.

Offline rocketeerjoe

  • Expert Waygook
  • ****
  • Posts: 768
  • Gender: Male
Re: Showing movies during Winter Camps: is it considered 'lazy' teaching?
« Reply #32 on: December 17, 2013, 03:27:34 PM »
I think the solution to this is showing either short animation or clips plus songs and then make ppts, activities, games around what you create to bolster vocabulary.

I'm putting together a lesson on Disney's "Frozen" based on just the song, the trailer, and a few clips Disney provided on Youtube. That's more than enough, in my opinion.

Also, look into the thread over in "non textbook lessons" for elementary and find the thread on Pixar shorts. The person who did those is a genius. I taught most of them last summer and I'm thinking of making one for "Day and Night" as well as "Paperman". There was some other Paperman ppt put up a while back but I'm doing a more involved vocabulary / grammar lesson.

Quote
Get off your high horse. This isn't a volunteer job - you and I are here to make money. Camps amount to a whole lot of extra work without extra compensation. NO OTHER COUNTRY has the camp system like Korea does. This setup is specifically designed to make sure YOUR vacation is LESS than the non-contract Korean teachers'.


I just had to respond to this because I COMPLETELY disagree. I love camps, and I think it provides the PERFECT opportunity for NETs to give their expertise. The creation of lesson plans that I've seen on this site has often been quite ingenious and I've had a LOT of fun in bringing English to them that they quite simply would not get in the books. We often make extra reading lessons using native materials, but also we get the chance to do science projects, recipes, all manner of fun stuff. I think it's a great idea. The Korean textbooks are often quite lacking and Korean teachers almost never have good ideas for camp. Turning it over to us to make lessons is awesome. I welcome it. Yes, let me do something that is fun and involving and uses a far more natural English. Great! I want more of that.

One of the things I came up with this last camp of mine is a plants lesson. We bought about 8 small plants or pots of small flowers and I am writing a bunch of sentences to teach them like "it has rounded leaves and purple-white flowers" or "it's a bright vermillion cactus". I'm going to have them walk around with the sentences on the wall and they can match writing them down with the numbered plants.

Do they do THAT in other countries? Probably not, most of them don't have the budgets. But I'm doing it. Because it's imaginative, it gives them something visible to associate English with, and because I can. So there.

I really like the idea of building a lesson around explaining song lyrics but the silent shorts are awesome because you can describe everything without having to worry about dialogue, which can help you a great deal to tailor to whatever age group you are working with.
« Last Edit: December 17, 2013, 03:34:09 PM by rocketeerjoe »
"If you want to change your direction. If your time of life is at hand. Well, then don't be the rule, be the exception. A good place to start is to stand. Just put one foot in front of the other." - Rankin Bass Santa Claus

Offline helen220

  • Waygookin
  • *
  • Posts: 21
  • Gender: Female
Re: Showing movies during Winter Camps: is it considered 'lazy' teaching?
« Reply #33 on: December 18, 2013, 02:01:54 PM »
I think the solution to this is showing either short animation or clips plus songs and then make ppts, activities, games around what you create to bolster vocabulary.

I'm putting together a lesson on Disney's "Frozen" based on just the song, the trailer, and a few clips Disney provided on Youtube. That's more than enough, in my opinion.

Also, look into the thread over in "non textbook lessons" for elementary and find the thread on Pixar shorts. The person who did those is a genius. I taught most of them last summer and I'm thinking of making one for "Day and Night" as well as "Paperman". There was some other Paperman ppt put up a while back but I'm doing a more involved vocabulary / grammar lesson.

Quote
Get off your high horse. This isn't a volunteer job - you and I are here to make money. Camps amount to a whole lot of extra work without extra compensation. NO OTHER COUNTRY has the camp system like Korea does. This setup is specifically designed to make sure YOUR vacation is LESS than the non-contract Korean teachers'.


I just had to respond to this because I COMPLETELY disagree. I love camps, and I think it provides the PERFECT opportunity for NETs to give their expertise. The creation of lesson plans that I've seen on this site has often been quite ingenious and I've had a LOT of fun in bringing English to them that they quite simply would not get in the books. We often make extra reading lessons using native materials, but also we get the chance to do science projects, recipes, all manner of fun stuff. I think it's a great idea. The Korean textbooks are often quite lacking and Korean teachers almost never have good ideas for camp. Turning it over to us to make lessons is awesome. I welcome it. Yes, let me do something that is fun and involving and uses a far more natural English. Great! I want more of that.

One of the things I came up with this last camp of mine is a plants lesson. We bought about 8 small plants or pots of small flowers and I am writing a bunch of sentences to teach them like "it has rounded leaves and purple-white flowers" or "it's a bright vermillion cactus". I'm going to have them walk around with the sentences on the wall and they can match writing them down with the numbered plants.

Do they do THAT in other countries? Probably not, most of them don't have the budgets. But I'm doing it. Because it's imaginative, it gives them something visible to associate English with, and because I can. So there.

I really like the idea of building a lesson around explaining song lyrics but the silent shorts are awesome because you can describe everything without having to worry about dialogue, which can help you a great deal to tailor to whatever age group you are working with.

So, I AGREE with your sentiments! A winter/summer camp is what you make of it. The more you put into it, the more rewarding it should be for both the students and yourself. I'm putting together my first camp and, while it's going to take a lot of work (I'm going with a "fun", hands-on science theme), the experience of planning and rolling it out should be very useful. Some NETs I know won't have any camp come January. Rather than looking forward to the free time and desk-warming, a few of them said they'd prefer their schools made proper use of them. I know that, come the end of my camp, I'll feel like something's been achieved and the experience will give me confidence for future lessons or camps.

Also, having a generous budget seems pretty unique to Korea. It surprises me how much money we're given to play with. Call me Scrooge but I don't feel comfortable flinging money about on materials, despite being assured by my colleague we're entitled to use it all up. Nevertheless, I like the fact it takes the pressure off my wallet when I need to invest in extra materials.

Offline ashe1590

  • Super Waygook
  • ***
  • Posts: 428
  • Gender: Female
Re: Showing movies during Winter Camps: is it considered 'lazy' teaching?
« Reply #34 on: December 18, 2013, 02:36:39 PM »
Also, having a generous budget seems pretty unique to Korea. It surprises me how much money we're given to play with. Call me Scrooge but I don't feel comfortable flinging money about on materials, despite being assured by my colleague we're entitled to use it all up. Nevertheless, I like the fact it takes the pressure off my wallet when I need to invest in extra materials.

My school has not given me any budget. I think that is much luck of the draw, and I while I don't mind I can see why some teachers would be reluctant to fork out for things. Some ideas I've seen seem really expensive (like making fruit salad - what?).

I'm not begrudging spending money on my students because my school is really good to me in terms of providing me with things I need, paying me on time, etc. But from what I've heard and talked about with my other friends, some schools are reluctant to spend more than a cent than they need to on their GETs and try to shaft them every payday. If that is someone's schools attitude, I'm not surprised the GETs build a little resentment.

Offline Nivea

  • Hero of Waygookistan
  • *****
  • Posts: 1644
Re: Showing movies during Winter Camps: is it considered 'lazy' teaching?
« Reply #35 on: January 07, 2014, 08:43:46 AM »
I really don't think that teachers should have to pay for materials since its the school that is putting on the camp and not the teachers having fun in their free time. That said half the time if they don't the camps would be "boring" and they would get crap from their school.

Offline btpham13

  • Expert Waygook
  • ****
  • Posts: 509
  • Gender: Male
Re: Showing movies during Winter Camps: is it considered 'lazy' teaching?
« Reply #36 on: January 07, 2014, 09:30:57 AM »
I really don't think that teachers should have to pay for materials since its the school that is putting on the camp and not the teachers having fun in their free time. That said half the time if they don't the camps would be "boring" and they would get crap from their school.

Yeah, I agree.  We technically shouldn't have to spend a won out of our pocket, but it depends on the school.  If the school has a color printer and some basic art supplies, we should be able to use those free resources to liven the camp up a bit.  Of course, there's only so much you can do with those things before the activities get repetitive.

I've never had any complaints from my camp, but I KNOW for a fact I've had some boring lessons.  I've also had high level kids, so they're used to boring lessons where they're forced to study and just take it.

So...it just depends on the school.  There's not much we can do but try our best, and if we get complaints from the higher ups, oh well, so be it.  'tis the life of a civil servant.

Offline ransy215

  • Adventurer
  • *
  • Posts: 25
  • Gender: Male
Re: Showing movies during Winter Camps: is it considered 'lazy' teaching?
« Reply #37 on: April 30, 2014, 06:47:08 PM »
I had a couple of million won camp budget a few times and I'd splash it on ingredients and dvd's - Needless to say we would make a western dish one day and the next a korean dish... after prepping all the eatables, we sat down and had microwave popcorn and our food-goodies while watching stuff like Monsters Uni, Wall-E, etc....

Go wild!!! get a budget and get stuff to do man!!!

Good luck anyways... :-)

Regards,

R.



« Last Edit: April 30, 2014, 06:49:48 PM by ransy215 »

Offline ransy215

  • Adventurer
  • *
  • Posts: 25
  • Gender: Male
Re: Showing movies during Winter Camps: is it considered 'lazy' teaching?
« Reply #38 on: April 30, 2014, 06:49:05 PM »
PS: I actually made worksheets of the different movies to sustantiate their use... and fun activities related to the movies as a review the next day...

Regards,

R.

Offline stuman

  • Veteran
  • **
  • Posts: 124
  • Gender: Male
I teach high school, and I showed the students 3 short movies on the last day of camp...After they wrote the story and dialog, acted, filmed and edited it. If you want an easy camp idea, this plan is it. After the first day, with decreasing amount of instruction on my part, the kids just ran with it. Maybe it was the fun of acting in it, or the cash prize I announced for the group of the best movie. (Best $50 investment I ever made.)