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Author Topic: Huge plaster casts  (Read 1442 times)

Online confusedsafferinkorea

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Huge plaster casts
« on: September 11, 2013, 11:46:16 AM »
Two of my students appeared this week with their arms up to the elbow in plaster casts (or whatever they are made from) and in a double sling.

When I quizzed them and asked them how they broke their arms they said, 'Oh no teacher I just broke my finger'.

What's the deal with these huge casts? In SA if you bread your finger you get a small cast and then it is strapped to your other fingers. I think this is overkill. Koreans seem to be so paranoid sometimes.
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Offline morgainenyl

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Re: Huge plaster casts
« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2013, 01:03:12 PM »
I don't know about that.  I broke a bone in my hand and they cast me past my freaking elbow. Depending on the bone and how it breaks, there's a surprising amount of bandaging necessary.

Then again, I wasn't in the cast like that for too long. Had to have surgery to fix the break.

Maybe certain breaks do require it though. I'm not sure that it's a paranoid Korean thing, but maybe it is. As a lowly English teacher I don't feel qualified to comment on doctor-like issues.

Online confusedsafferinkorea

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Re: Huge plaster casts
« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2013, 02:02:52 PM »
I don't know about that.  I broke a bone in my hand and they cast me past my freaking elbow. Depending on the bone and how it breaks, there's a surprising amount of bandaging necessary.

Then again, I wasn't in the cast like that for too long. Had to have surgery to fix the break.

Maybe certain breaks do require it though. I'm not sure that it's a paranoid Korean thing, but maybe it is. As a lowly English teacher I don't feel qualified to comment on doctor-like issues.

I can understand it if it was a bone in the hand which perhaps needs to be immobilised but your finger can be immobilised successfully with a small cast and strapping.

Of course I am not a doctor but I have never seen anyone ever plastered up like this in SA for a broken finger.
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Online TheEnergizer

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Re: Huge plaster casts
« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2013, 02:14:15 PM »
I've seen students with this as well, but then looked it up and found that depending on how the bone is broken, it's pretty common to have a full cast like that even for just a broken finger (here and other countries).

These students do seem to break some body part every other week though.

Offline Mezoti97

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Re: Huge plaster casts
« Reply #4 on: September 11, 2013, 03:05:47 PM »
When I was in elementary school, I broke my arm (near my elbow), so my arm was in a cast from my hand to about halfway above my elbow on my upper arm. When I was in high school, I broke a finger from playing basketball, and my finger was just kept in a splint until it healed.

Also, a couple years ago, I got bit on the hand by some insect that made my hand get very swollen. When I went to the hospital to get it looked at by a doctor, the doctor wrapped my hand up with a sprain bandage wrap, and wrapped it up all the way up to halfway up my forearm. That was my experience with casts, splints, and sprain bandage wraps, at least.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2013, 03:11:36 PM by Mezoti97 »

 



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