December 11, 2018, 04:05:34 AM


Author Topic: HOW DO I CONTACT THE LABOR/LABOUR BOARD?  (Read 7548 times)

Offline Davey

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HOW DO I CONTACT THE LABOR/LABOUR BOARD?
« on: August 23, 2012, 02:30:12 AM »
On the left hand side scroll down and you will see a phone number for foreign workers.

 http://www.moel.go.kr/english/main.jsp

Ministry of Employment and Labor/Labour
www.moel.go.kr

You do NOT have tell them who your employer is, although this will obviously be necessary if you want the board to resolve an issue.

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Offline CDW

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Re: HOW DO I CONTACT THE LABOR/LABOUR BOARD?
« Reply #1 on: August 24, 2012, 10:09:46 AM »
You can use the e-People service to petition the labor board for assistance.
http://www.epeople.go.kr/jsp/user/on/eng/FrnPcCvreqForm.jsp

Offline iamrhart

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Re: HOW DO I CONTACT THE LABOR/LABOUR BOARD?
« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2013, 06:45:11 PM »
call 1350.
speak to a counselor.
They will tell you to go to epeople.go.kr  when you go there, you will have an option to fill out two applications.

fill out one (or both). different situations go to different departments (they have two departments. Ministry Of Labor and Anti Corruption something.

wait about 7-10 days. If you dont see a result, call again.

hope that helps.
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Offline get_me_dog

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Re: HOW DO I CONTACT THE LABOR/LABOUR BOARD?
« Reply #3 on: September 26, 2017, 06:48:42 PM »
The epeople service is very good for claims of unpaid wages of up to 1,500,000 KRW and if the contract is well written, if there are time cards, if the pay stubs clearly show the deductions made etc, and then it is straight forward matter.

The MOL does have Legal Aid for workers if they are earning less than 15,000,0000 KRW per year.... most of the participants on this board probably would not qualify for Legal Aid.

The next "level" for more serious issues above 1,500,000 KRW is utilizing a Korean Labor Attorney.  The specialize in Korean Labor Law, cases take a max of 90 days, there is a system of appeal, and the case can go to the Supreme Court and many have gone the full course.

A Korean Labor Attorney can also sponsor the G-11 VISA to allow you to stay in Korea while the case.  Some Korean Labor Attorneys are also Immigration Advocates (there are no "Immigration Attorneys" per say as in the USA) and really they tend to be more time and cost effective than Civil Attorneys in areas of Labor Law just because they specialize in Labor Law where as a Civil Attorney will have one or two cases a year but Civil Attorneys do have their place.

If the case involves the employer making promises of Loans, or discounts on housing or cars etc, then those are truly Civil Issues which are adjudicated under the Commercial Act and other elements of Civil Law.   Everything to do about unpaid wages, severance, salary, pension, health and wrongful termination (unfair dismissal) and job reinstatement is all Labor Law and there is no difference in the outcome.  Civil Judges will brush up on the current rulings issued by the Labor Commission (the Judges may only have one or two trials a year for Labor Issues) and it is kinda a lot of work for the Civil Judge.  Really, if the other "benefits" in the contract are about 20-30 M KRW then the Civil Attorney may be the better way to go.  With a Labor Law Case being brought before a Civil Judge you will need to pay court fees of up to 3% of the Commercial Claims, (property transfer and promised expenditures by the employer) and the filing fees may include the any filing fees required to have the Labor Law Case tried in Civil Court instead of the Labor Commission.

Some times you need a stapler, some times a nail gun and some times a watch makers wrench set; they are all effective upon what they were designed to deal with.