February 17, 2019, 04:13:59 PM


Author Topic: Yes, Lesson Planning is Hard  (Read 43800 times)

Offline poulakell

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Re: Yes, Lesson Planning is Hard
« Reply #60 on: March 05, 2012, 10:28:18 AM »
Your ideas seem really good, it's important that you also have some interest to what you are trying to teach as well! Once I'm a full member I'll be more than happy to up load my lessons and get feedback on them!

Offline sbeau

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Re: Yes, Lesson Planning is Hard
« Reply #61 on: March 05, 2012, 11:21:17 AM »
I'm finding it a bit difficult to plan lessons thematically (the way I usually do/would like to do) given the content I have to cover in the book (the listen and talk section). Some of these sections seem quite boring and sometimes border on irrelevant...what's the best way to spice them up without veering too far from the school's expectations? Do you usually impose a theme on them/bend them to suit your purpose?

Offline victoriab27

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Re: Yes, Lesson Planning is Hard
« Reply #62 on: March 07, 2012, 03:45:15 PM »
This is extremely helpful, thank you.

My co-teach is really on the ball and I'm very much a supplement to her. I couldn't have asked for a better way to ease into the job. As far as I can tell I just have to constantly be prepared for the class to tank (I fully expect this to happen in my afterschool classes. Fortunately there is always the Wiggles.

Offline rgall513

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Re: Yes, Lesson Planning is Hard
« Reply #63 on: March 09, 2012, 01:34:58 PM »
So I am lesson planning but my text books and teachers guides are almost all in Korean! There is no curriculum for after school classes as far as I know... is it okay to just use games, etc. for after school?

Offline blommie-SA

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Re: Yes, Lesson Planning is Hard
« Reply #64 on: March 12, 2012, 07:35:51 PM »
I haven't been here long but I struggle to get the information or topic sometimes from my co teachers, leaving me
under pressure constantly. Some days the co-teacher will only give me the topic 30min before I may leave
for home.

How can you have back up planning or games for that?
The one co-teacher wants me to use the text book and if there is time left she wants me to make a presentation...
The other co-techer wants me to plan a 45min class on my own, where I am not allowed to use the text book at all.

Surly there is some continuation throughout schools here as well? Or not?

Offline letitflow

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Re: Yes, Lesson Planning is Hard
« Reply #65 on: March 16, 2012, 11:02:57 AM »
I think the most important thing in a lesson plan is to find out the goal of your lesson.
For example, if you want to teach imperatives, focus on what you want students to do after your lesson. You might want your students to listen to your imperatives and act out. So the goal can be listen to the imperatives, understand what they mean and act out.
Then you can logically plan the steps in order to reach the goal.
First of all, you need to recognize students' background knowledge, because it lets you know where to start.
If your students know stand up, and sit down, you might want to teach other things like raise your hands and so on. (the ones you want to teach.)
I hope this gives a little help. Everyone good luck!

Offline redlanternsplinter

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No, lesson planning is not hard
« Reply #66 on: March 21, 2012, 10:26:14 AM »
Know the language item to be taught, the rest falls into place.  This site and others have excellent materials.  Keep your lesson plan simple.  Have your students participate in role plays as often as possible. 

P.S. Thank you to all those who have contributed materials.

Offline LeanTeacher

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Re: Yes, Lesson Planning is Hard
« Reply #67 on: March 21, 2012, 10:40:56 AM »
Finally, my school doesn't know whether I've spent 3 hours planning a class or 3 minutes... but I do.

I think mine might... but that's why I'm here. Thanks for sharing this advice!

Offline pinedust

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Re: Yes, Lesson Planning is Hard
« Reply #68 on: March 27, 2012, 03:38:02 AM »
I didn't realize how difficult lesson planning would be-- but this thread really helped me out. I found that if you K.I.S.S. (Keep It Simple Stupid) you'll go a long way!  ;)


Offline jaegalyang0627

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Re: Yes, Lesson Planning is Hard
« Reply #69 on: March 28, 2012, 07:37:42 PM »

 Ah... Actually, I just make lesson plan one or two times a year for my open class.
But sometimes I make my own lesson plans like just some information I should check.
Yes, lesson plan is difficult for me. 

Offline kschaeffer

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Re: Yes, Lesson Planning is Hard
« Reply #70 on: March 29, 2012, 01:48:34 PM »
This was helpful to read, especially since my first day of teaching is fast approaching, and I have spent the past three days trying to prepare. I have never taught before, nor planned a lesson. I also don't have a TEFL certificate. Really at this point I'm just some guy, but this gives at least some direction to my future lesson planning chaos.

Offline clairemont

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Re: Yes, Lesson Planning is Hard
« Reply #71 on: April 03, 2012, 12:01:09 PM »
Thanks - this is really good advice. I was also surprised that there's lots of untranslated Korean in the teacher textbook, but it feels more manageable now:)

Offline misssunshine

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Re: Yes, Lesson Planning is Hard
« Reply #72 on: April 12, 2012, 01:02:41 PM »
Thank you very much for your insight. i am a newbie teacher and I did my first lesson today, which didn't go off well. It is so hard to keep the attention of 40 middle schoolers!

Offline Lilly

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Re: Yes, Lesson Planning is Hard
« Reply #73 on: June 02, 2012, 10:08:24 PM »
Thank you for sharing your lesson planning strategy. I'll be teaching my first public school class in a few days, so this information will be very helpful.

Offline Champ

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Re: Yes, Lesson Planning is Hard
« Reply #74 on: June 03, 2012, 04:37:44 PM »
omg, I was so stressing out about planning my lessons.  Still trying to get my head around how the Koreans plan their lessons.  I'm so thankful for waygook!! I'm so happy we can turn to this site for advise and assistant with planning and all :). 

Offline est0131

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Re: Yes, Lesson Planning is Hard
« Reply #75 on: June 05, 2012, 09:46:07 AM »
thank God for waygook.org  ;)

Offline trendgame

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Re: Yes, Lesson Planning is Hard
« Reply #76 on: June 07, 2012, 10:43:26 AM »
Firstly I want to echo est0131's sentiments - yes! Thank God/Buddha/Allah/FlyingSpaghettiMonster/Yoda for this wonderful network - it's a lifesaver and a blessing for our continual development as teachers (a job that I'm starting to feel is never over).

Secondly I wanted to add something about lesson planning with regards to the kids in Korea.

People have already mentioned the importance of making lessons that are fun and engaging in order to keep kids attention. One important thing to bare in mind when planning lessons for Korean kids of all ages (I assume, though I've only taught middle school myself) is their attention span.

Korea is a country obsessed with gadgetry and super fast information exchange and access. It's important to remember that your kids will probably have an incredibly short attention span, lessened by the fact that they probably spend the rest of their lessons during the school day being lectured at and forced to memorise/recite vast quantities of information.

I'd suggest trying to make PPTs or lessons which move quickly from one thing to another while staying within the boundaries of the topic of course. There are a tonne of really useful 'review' PPTs that I got from here (a few of which I'll attach) and I've found that sticking odd sentence scambles/word scrambles/hang man slides/vocab test slides into the lessons keeps the kids on their toes and helps maintain energy/concentration in the lesson.

Hope someone else finds this tip useful!

PS I don't claim credit for these PPTs - I found them on here. Unfortunately I can't remember who the original poster was or who made them but I owe them my thanks because they're great!
In teaching you cannot see the fruit of a day's work. It is invisible and remains so, maybe for twenty years.
-- Jacques Barzun

Offline Jules

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Re: Yes, Lesson Planning is Hard
« Reply #77 on: June 20, 2012, 08:18:48 AM »
I'm a new teacher in Korea at a middle school and my co-teacher says I should plan my lesson as I see fit.

The problem is, I dont know where to start or what to base them on because the students level of English is pretty low.

I would welcome any suggestions.

Thank you.

Offline artwalknoon

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Re: Yes, Lesson Planning is Hard
« Reply #78 on: June 20, 2012, 03:06:01 PM »
I enjoy lesson planning but it does take a long time. I like it because I can envision in my head how students will respond to different activities and gauge the effectiveness of my lesson as I'm planning it. It helps me feel confident in my performance as I enter a classroom.


I'm a new teacher in Korea at a middle school and my co-teacher says I should plan my lesson as I see fit.

The problem is, I dont know where to start or what to base them on because the students level of English is pretty low.

I would welcome any suggestions.

Thank you.

One thing I would suggest is to start with some easy lessons that only require one word English answers then build up to stem questions and answers.

For example I did a lesson on food tastes like sweet, sour, salty, etc. First I introduced the vocab with my co-teacher providing a Korean translation of each word. Then we drilled the words twice.

The next part I showed a picture of a food they know or should know and asked them to tell me how it tastes. I used both Korean food and food from other cultures that are popular in Korea. I made sure to choose really appetizing photos to get good reactions from my students. Then after each food picture I would ask a question and provide a stem answer. This lesson went really well at all my schools; especially with my low level classes.

Offline trendgame

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Re: Yes, Lesson Planning is Hard
« Reply #79 on: June 21, 2012, 02:50:56 PM »
Yes I can second this.

I try to think of lesson planning like a puzzle where you've got to figure out the best way to make the lesson success. It means consideration of so many different factors but if you think of it this way then you start learning from each lesson you do and every mistake you make.

Also, building up from straight forward, one word answers to larger more complex sentences is good advice. In my experience students have been much more motivated through the lesson if you start with something familiar and within their ability level. If it's too hard they tend to just be zoned out for the rest of the lesson. This is why warm ups can be super important.
In teaching you cannot see the fruit of a day's work. It is invisible and remains so, maybe for twenty years.
-- Jacques Barzun