December 14, 2018, 12:24:48 AM


Author Topic: FAQ (ARC, extending visa, severance, etc., etc.) UPDATED August 28, 2014  (Read 75076 times)

Offline lotte world

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Yeah, obviously. I did that, of course, and I didn't receive a reply. Also that phone number is only good for finding out where immigration office locations are btw.

I'm looking for practical information on how to apply for a visa extension online.
I was also hoping to find out wether or not other people were encountering this problem with the hikorea website as well.

Maybe they are too busy to reply.  Or maybe it will take  a little longer.  Or maybe they'll just fix the problem silently and you should try again later.

The number 1345 is not only for finding out where immigration offices are.  Dial it and you can speak to an English-speaking staff member at Immigration.  You can ask them things and they will give you answers.  Try it now- you can ask them about applying for a visa extension online.  They'll talk you through using the website, and when you get to the error again you can tell them right there and then.

Offline DPkorea

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Thanks for the summary of the content of most contracts, its been really helpful. I'm still a bit confused about whether or not we get paid the exit allowance if we re-sign for another year. From what I've read and heard we don't get paid the exit allowance until you're actually leaving Korea (and not re-signing) which I think would make more sense. But someone else was telling me you get paid to fly home (and back) during the two weeks you have off before starting the new contract.

Offline lotte world

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Thanks for the summary of the content of most contracts, its been really helpful. I'm still a bit confused about whether or not we get paid the exit allowance if we re-sign for another year. From what I've read and heard we don't get paid the exit allowance until you're actually leaving Korea (and not re-signing) which I think would make more sense. But someone else was telling me you get paid to fly home (and back) during the two weeks you have off before starting the new contract.

Read your contract.

My contract says if I leave at the end I get 1.3m won.  If I re-sign I get 2m won and two weeks' vacation.

Most contracts are very similar in that regard.

Offline JDUSF21

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I don't know if anyone has any advice, suggestions, or experience with anything like this, but I'm hoping someone can help or at least make sense of it:

My one-year contract ends August 31st. I already told my school I won't be renewing, even though I am pretty content here. I just have a chance to teach in Europe again and want to go back.  The problem is this:  orientation for my next job begins August 24th, however it's not like it is in Korea where you can miss the first orientation and attend a later one or show up later in the term. Missing orientation in August would be a significant detriment to the teacher, as ALL new teachers arrive and begin at the same time. 

The problem, thus, is easy to see.  I would be "breaking" my contract by about a week and thus risk forfeiting the $4,000 (or more) I would receive from severance pay, exit allowance, and pension.  For leaving a week early.  I have spoken with my school about this, and they want to try to work something out, but the office of education has said no dice.  I even volunteered to sacrifice all my summer vacation days so as not to miss any actual work days, and they still say "No, you can't leave early."  Well, to be honest, it's a little hard to tell exactly what they mean since the folks who work in the SEPIC office have such terrible command of English that their email responses are grammar disasters that rarely make much sense. 

I have come to work every single day (even when I've been very sick) at a low-level school in a village in the middle of nowhere where no one wants to teach.  I love my kids and give everything I can to this job.  I would be happy to stay through my whole year if it didn't seriously jeopardize my next job, but I have no choice.  Has anyone encountered or heard of situations like this.  Any suggestions at all?  I hate even having to bother you all with this shit and would much rather try to take care of everything on my own, but I'm at a loss for what to do here.  Any ideas or help you can provide are greatly appreciated.  Thank you. 

Offline lotte world

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I don't know if anyone has any advice, suggestions, or experience with anything like this, but I'm hoping someone can help or at least make sense of it:

My one-year contract ends August 31st. I already told my school I won't be renewing, even though I am pretty content here. I just have a chance to teach in Europe again and want to go back.  The problem is this:  orientation for my next job begins August 24th, however it's not like it is in Korea where you can miss the first orientation and attend a later one or show up later in the term. Missing orientation in August would be a significant detriment to the teacher, as ALL new teachers arrive and begin at the same time. 

The problem, thus, is easy to see.  I would be "breaking" my contract by about a week and thus risk forfeiting the $4,000 (or more) I would receive from severance pay, exit allowance, and pension.  For leaving a week early.  I have spoken with my school about this, and they want to try to work something out, but the office of education has said no dice.  I even volunteered to sacrifice all my summer vacation days so as not to miss any actual work days, and they still say "No, you can't leave early."  Well, to be honest, it's a little hard to tell exactly what they mean since the folks who work in the SEPIC office have such terrible command of English that their email responses are grammar disasters that rarely make much sense. 

I have come to work every single day (even when I've been very sick) at a low-level school in a village in the middle of nowhere where no one wants to teach.  I love my kids and give everything I can to this job.  I would be happy to stay through my whole year if it didn't seriously jeopardize my next job, but I have no choice.  Has anyone encountered or heard of situations like this.  Any suggestions at all?  I hate even having to bother you all with this shit and would much rather try to take care of everything on my own, but I'm at a loss for what to do here.  Any ideas or help you can provide are greatly appreciated.  Thank you.

Them's the breaks.

You should put in notice on July 22nd, and leave on August 22nd.  You will have time to travel to your orientation on the 24th.

You won't lose pension (assume you qualify to claim it), but indeed, you will lose your airfare and severance because you did not complete 12 months of service.

That's how it is.  You should have realised it before you took the new job.

Offline lotte world

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I don't know if anyone has any advice, suggestions, or experience with anything like this, but I'm hoping someone can help or at least make sense of it:

My one-year contract ends August 31st. I already told my school I won't be renewing, even though I am pretty content here. I just have a chance to teach in Europe again and want to go back.  The problem is this:  orientation for my next job begins August 24th, however it's not like it is in Korea where you can miss the first orientation and attend a later one or show up later in the term. Missing orientation in August would be a significant detriment to the teacher, as ALL new teachers arrive and begin at the same time. 

The problem, thus, is easy to see.  I would be "breaking" my contract by about a week and thus risk forfeiting the $4,000 (or more) I would receive from severance pay, exit allowance, and pension.  For leaving a week early.  I have spoken with my school about this, and they want to try to work something out, but the office of education has said no dice.  I even volunteered to sacrifice all my summer vacation days so as not to miss any actual work days, and they still say "No, you can't leave early."  Well, to be honest, it's a little hard to tell exactly what they mean since the folks who work in the SEPIC office have such terrible command of English that their email responses are grammar disasters that rarely make much sense. 

I have come to work every single day (even when I've been very sick) at a low-level school in a village in the middle of nowhere where no one wants to teach.  I love my kids and give everything I can to this job.  I would be happy to stay through my whole year if it didn't seriously jeopardize my next job, but I have no choice.  Has anyone encountered or heard of situations like this.  Any suggestions at all?  I hate even having to bother you all with this shit and would much rather try to take care of everything on my own, but I'm at a loss for what to do here.  Any ideas or help you can provide are greatly appreciated.  Thank you.

Them's the breaks.

You should put in notice on July 22nd, and leave on August 22nd.  You will have time to travel to your orientation on the 24th.

You won't lose pension (assume you qualify to claim it), but indeed, you will lose your airfare and severance because you did not complete 12 months of service.

That's how it is.  You should have realised it before you took the new job.

Offline JDUSF21

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I don't know if anyone has any advice, suggestions, or experience with anything like this, but I'm hoping someone can help or at least make sense of it:

My one-year contract ends August 31st. I already told my school I won't be renewing, even though I am pretty content here. I just have a chance to teach in Europe again and want to go back.  The problem is this:  orientation for my next job begins August 24th, however it's not like it is in Korea where you can miss the first orientation and attend a later one or show up later in the term. Missing orientation in August would be a significant detriment to the teacher, as ALL new teachers arrive and begin at the same time. 

The problem, thus, is easy to see.  I would be "breaking" my contract by about a week and thus risk forfeiting the $4,000 (or more) I would receive from severance pay, exit allowance, and pension.  For leaving a week early.  I have spoken with my school about this, and they want to try to work something out, but the office of education has said no dice.  I even volunteered to sacrifice all my summer vacation days so as not to miss any actual work days, and they still say "No, you can't leave early."  Well, to be honest, it's a little hard to tell exactly what they mean since the folks who work in the SEPIC office have such terrible command of English that their email responses are grammar disasters that rarely make much sense. 

I have come to work every single day (even when I've been very sick) at a low-level school in a village in the middle of nowhere where no one wants to teach.  I love my kids and give everything I can to this job.  I would be happy to stay through my whole year if it didn't seriously jeopardize my next job, but I have no choice.  Has anyone encountered or heard of situations like this.  Any suggestions at all?  I hate even having to bother you all with this shit and would much rather try to take care of everything on my own, but I'm at a loss for what to do here.  Any ideas or help you can provide are greatly appreciated.  Thank you.

Them's the breaks.

You should put in notice on July 22nd, and leave on August 22nd.  You will have time to travel to your orientation on the 24th.

You won't lose pension (assume you qualify to claim it), but indeed, you will lose your airfare and severance because you did not complete 12 months of service.

That's how it is.  You should have realised it before you took the new job.


Wow, thanks.  I was looking for advice, but instead I got condescension, which is why I was loath to post this on here in the first place.  I haven't taken the other job yet, because I was afraid of something exactly like this happening, but thank you for telling me "I should have known" anyway.  It must feel amazing to be smarter than everyone else. 

As if I needed any other indicators of why leaving Korea might be a decent idea, the foreigners are always quick to remind me.  Thank you!!

If anyone else here feels like telling me anything constructive, I'm all ears.

Offline lolly

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When should you bring up the topic of holidays? how early is too early?

Offline skippy

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That is the question.  You want to give enough notice for them to panic a little, then prepare for your absence.   Still not to early that they ya-ya you, ignore the problem, forget about request, then week before vacation refuse request.  Remember Korea and planning ahead are not common.  Many things are last minute.

The best practice is to warn right when you can.  And keep warning and informing of your choice. I mean really beat it into there head. Get things written down and agreed to on paper.  Do not take understandings or handshakes.   Those will be overturned.
Please consider adding some info to your "Personal Text"  Like type of school, visa status, county of origin.  These little bits of info can help people help you.

Offline col89

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Hi,

I was under the impression that I was entitled to the pension sum upon my return to Ireland (as well as other European citizens). I was even told this by my boss. But, now, I'm very concerned after witnessing this thread, and even my boss has now done a U-turn and told me that there is no way that I will see any of that money.

What I want to ask is:

- seemingly true, and that citizens of the European Union are NOT entitled to a pension refund, why is this case? I really don't understand it, but I was almost certain that Europeans would have pension relief, just like those coming from America, Canada, and Australia. What policies are different and what are they exactly?
- the second thing is that, going by what my boss said last year, I'm wondering as to whether he was confusing the pension situation with another, and that there is some way or means of obtaining a part of that deduction? I hope I make sense by typing this, but I just don't understand as to why some individuals miss out completely, while others have no issue with such matters. In a nutshell, what I'm asking in this point, is there some kind of *alternative* available for those people, specifically just like myself?

Sorry if this is a stupid question to ask. I'm afraid that I've answered my own question, but I want to ensure that everything is done correctly, because that money was going towards very important plans (as it was going into my savings for a PhD). Any reply or help would be great.

Regards,

A Concerned Irishman.

Offline lotte world

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Hi,

I was under the impression that I was entitled to the pension sum upon my return to Ireland (as well as other European citizens). I was even told this by my boss. But, now, I'm very concerned after witnessing this thread, and even my boss has now done a U-turn and told me that there is no way that I will see any of that money.

What I want to ask is:

- seemingly true, and that citizens of the European Union are NOT entitled to a pension refund, why is this case? I really don't understand it, but I was almost certain that Europeans would have pension relief, just like those coming from America, Canada, and Australia. What policies are different and what are they exactly?
- the second thing is that, going by what my boss said last year, I'm wondering as to whether he was confusing the pension situation with another, and that there is some way or means of obtaining a part of that deduction? I hope I make sense by typing this, but I just don't understand as to why some individuals miss out completely, while others have no issue with such matters. In a nutshell, what I'm asking in this point, is there some kind of *alternative* available for those people, specifically just like myself?

Sorry if this is a stupid question to ask. I'm afraid that I've answered my own question, but I want to ensure that everything is done correctly, because that money was going towards very important plans (as it was going into my savings for a PhD). Any reply or help would be great.

Regards,

A Concerned Irishman.

It would seem that Irish citizens are not eligible for a pension refund.  Only Americans, Canadians and Australians.  Check your contract (in EPIK it's section 13.6).  Sorry to break it to you, but you, like me, have to pay in, but you don't get anything out.  Your boss probably should never have said you could.

Irish citizens (at public school) also do not qualify for tax exemption for the first two years either.  Sorry.

The reason it's different is because it depends on what negotiations have happened between your government and the Korean government.  Each country is different.

Are you at a hagwon or a public school?

Offline livzy

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As a UK national I'm under the impression I can't claim back the cash either, but what I am able to do is put those payments towards the UK's national pension. The UK will claim it from Korea and it will go towards my National Insurance 'stamp', effectively meaning I don't have to contribute while I'm here. It also means my employer here is also contributing on my behalf.

It's not as good as getting it in a nice lump sum when you leave, but further on down the line I expect I'll be grateful.

Not sure if Ireland has the same arrangement.

Offline guapabuddha

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Hi! I am just curious...has anyone ever actually got their pension back at the airport?
My contract finishes July 24th. I will go to the pension office next week (18th) with my plane ticket and info and I will depart country on the 29th. I would like to get my pension at the airport at that time. Whenever I called the pension office they said it was totally up to the pension office I file at if I can get it at the airport.
I was just wondering if anyone has picked it up at the airport? If so, how long in advance did you file for it?

Offline lotte world

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Hi! I am just curious...has anyone ever actually got their pension back at the airport?
My contract finishes July 24th. I will go to the pension office next week (18th) with my plane ticket and info and I will depart country on the 29th. I would like to get my pension at the airport at that time. Whenever I called the pension office they said it was totally up to the pension office I file at if I can get it at the airport.
I was just wondering if anyone has picked it up at the airport? If so, how long in advance did you file for it?

Use the search function.  There are stories of people who have done exactly that, and what they did to achieve it.

Offline Mokona

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According to my GEPIK contract the airfare shall be returned within 30days yet my school told me that they will refund my airfare ticket after 3 months of my employment...

I dunno if this is part of violating the contract or something similar did happen to other teachers.

Thanks!!

Offline sligotrac

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Hey guys,
I moved from working in a hagwon to a public school. However when I asked my co about getting a settlement fee for starting work in a public school, she said I wasn't entitled because I was already in Korea. Is this correct?
I was thinking I should be entitled to something?

Offline col89

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Hi,

I was under the impression that I was entitled to the pension sum upon my return to Ireland (as well as other European citizens). I was even told this by my boss. But, now, I'm very concerned after witnessing this thread, and even my boss has now done a U-turn and told me that there is no way that I will see any of that money.

What I want to ask is:

- seemingly true, and that citizens of the European Union are NOT entitled to a pension refund, why is this case? I really don't understand it, but I was almost certain that Europeans would have pension relief, just like those coming from America, Canada, and Australia. What policies are different and what are they exactly?
- the second thing is that, going by what my boss said last year, I'm wondering as to whether he was confusing the pension situation with another, and that there is some way or means of obtaining a part of that deduction? I hope I make sense by typing this, but I just don't understand as to why some individuals miss out completely, while others have no issue with such matters. In a nutshell, what I'm asking in this point, is there some kind of *alternative* available for those people, specifically just like myself?

Sorry if this is a stupid question to ask. I'm afraid that I've answered my own question, but I want to ensure that everything is done correctly, because that money was going towards very important plans (as it was going into my savings for a PhD). Any reply or help would be great.

Regards,

A Concerned Irishman.

It would seem that Irish citizens are not eligible for a pension refund.  Only Americans, Canadians and Australians.  Check your contract (in EPIK it's section 13.6).  Sorry to break it to you, but you, like me, have to pay in, but you don't get anything out.  Your boss probably should never have said you could.

Irish citizens (at public school) also do not qualify for tax exemption for the first two years either.  Sorry.

The reason it's different is because it depends on what negotiations have happened between your government and the Korean government.  Each country is different.

Are you at a hagwon or a public school?

I'm at a hagwon. Sorry, I should have stated that from the very beginning.

Would I be able to get back any sum of the pension or taxes, at all, do you know?

Offline lotte world

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Hi,

I was under the impression that I was entitled to the pension sum upon my return to Ireland (as well as other European citizens). I was even told this by my boss. But, now, I'm very concerned after witnessing this thread, and even my boss has now done a U-turn and told me that there is no way that I will see any of that money.

What I want to ask is:

- seemingly true, and that citizens of the European Union are NOT entitled to a pension refund, why is this case? I really don't understand it, but I was almost certain that Europeans would have pension relief, just like those coming from America, Canada, and Australia. What policies are different and what are they exactly?
- the second thing is that, going by what my boss said last year, I'm wondering as to whether he was confusing the pension situation with another, and that there is some way or means of obtaining a part of that deduction? I hope I make sense by typing this, but I just don't understand as to why some individuals miss out completely, while others have no issue with such matters. In a nutshell, what I'm asking in this point, is there some kind of *alternative* available for those people, specifically just like myself?

Sorry if this is a stupid question to ask. I'm afraid that I've answered my own question, but I want to ensure that everything is done correctly, because that money was going towards very important plans (as it was going into my savings for a PhD). Any reply or help would be great.

Regards,

A Concerned Irishman.

It would seem that Irish citizens are not eligible for a pension refund.  Only Americans, Canadians and Australians.  Check your contract (in EPIK it's section 13.6).  Sorry to break it to you, but you, like me, have to pay in, but you don't get anything out.  Your boss probably should never have said you could.

Irish citizens (at public school) also do not qualify for tax exemption for the first two years either.  Sorry.

The reason it's different is because it depends on what negotiations have happened between your government and the Korean government.  Each country is different.

Are you at a hagwon or a public school?

I'm at a hagwon. Sorry, I should have stated that from the very beginning.

Would I be able to get back any sum of the pension or taxes, at all, do you know?

You will not get anything back.

You do not qualify for a pension lump sum (because you are an Irish citizen).  You do not qualify for tax exemption (because you are an Irish citizen, or because you work at a hagwon.  You can choose which reason you prefer).

Sorry.

Offline Philbo

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A big “Hello” to all of my fellow Aussie expats out there!

I just finished having my application for an Incheon Airport pension cash refund processed at Changwon NPS today.
A very easy experience! I also extended my stay in Korea for 5 days after my contract ends. It was free.

In regards to my refund, I did not need to show a ticket to my home country. I produced a one-way ticket to Bangkok. Not  a problem. I read on this site that Aussies were being asked to supply a Centrelink Customer Reference Number. Not me.

The whole process took about 20 minutes.

Now I can walk through immigration, and pick up cash on my way out. Hooray!
Perhaps a little duty-free shopping, and some extra fun-money for my final destination, hehe.

So great to be an Australian!


Offline col89

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Hi,

I was under the impression that I was entitled to the pension sum upon my return to Ireland (as well as other European citizens). I was even told this by my boss. But, now, I'm very concerned after witnessing this thread, and even my boss has now done a U-turn and told me that there is no way that I will see any of that money.

What I want to ask is:

- seemingly true, and that citizens of the European Union are NOT entitled to a pension refund, why is this case? I really don't understand it, but I was almost certain that Europeans would have pension relief, just like those coming from America, Canada, and Australia. What policies are different and what are they exactly?
- the second thing is that, going by what my boss said last year, I'm wondering as to whether he was confusing the pension situation with another, and that there is some way or means of obtaining a part of that deduction? I hope I make sense by typing this, but I just don't understand as to why some individuals miss out completely, while others have no issue with such matters. In a nutshell, what I'm asking in this point, is there some kind of *alternative* available for those people, specifically just like myself?

Sorry if this is a stupid question to ask. I'm afraid that I've answered my own question, but I want to ensure that everything is done correctly, because that money was going towards very important plans (as it was going into my savings for a PhD). Any reply or help would be great.

Regards,

A Concerned Irishman.

It would seem that Irish citizens are not eligible for a pension refund.  Only Americans, Canadians and Australians.  Check your contract (in EPIK it's section 13.6).  Sorry to break it to you, but you, like me, have to pay in, but you don't get anything out.  Your boss probably should never have said you could.

Irish citizens (at public school) also do not qualify for tax exemption for the first two years either.  Sorry.

The reason it's different is because it depends on what negotiations have happened between your government and the Korean government.  Each country is different.

Are you at a hagwon or a public school?

I'm at a hagwon. Sorry, I should have stated that from the very beginning.

Would I be able to get back any sum of the pension or taxes, at all, do you know?

You will not get anything back.

You do not qualify for a pension lump sum (because you are an Irish citizen).  You do not qualify for tax exemption (because you are an Irish citizen, or because you work at a hagwon.  You can choose which reason you prefer).

Sorry.

Sorry for the late reply.

This confuses me slightly because it states in my contract that I am exempt from taxes, and yet I am being 'taxed' from my hagwon. Furthermore, the Korean Standard Labor Act states that those citizens working in the first two years are exempt from such taxation.

Can anyone clear this up, please?