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Author Topic: Kill the Apostrophe  (Read 5190 times)

Offline Sara

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Re: Kill the Apostrophe
« Reply #20 on: November 18, 2011, 04:31:43 PM »
http://theoatmeal.com/comics/apostrophe

A great poster that shows how to use the apostrophe.

It's good except that it's 90s, not 90's. '90s is fine, since that's showing an abbreviation, but there's no need for an apostrophe after 90. 1990's would work to describe something belonging to 1990, such as in 'MC Hammer was 1990's popular rapper'.

Another problem with that example is that one should not start a sentence with a number in numerical format. It should read "Nineties fashion was a bit awkward." (Still no apostrophe necessary  ;) )

Offline Jeff619

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Re: Kill the Apostrophe
« Reply #21 on: November 18, 2011, 04:55:33 PM »
I'm assuming this is just in good fun, but it reminds me of New Zealand's decision to allow text speak on their national exams.  I've seen a poster or two on here that use it and it amazes me that they actually teach English here.  Some call it the normal evolution of language while others will call it decline...

Offline DejaVu

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Re: Kill the Apostrophe
« Reply #22 on: November 18, 2011, 08:28:38 PM »
Thanks for the replys!
I didn't know both possessive examples were considered acceptable. I imagine it depends on where you're from as to how we were most likely taught. I guess I heard "Chris' " first and it stuck.

Cheers.

The most widely known rule (and therefore [I suppose, to those who need a "correct" way of using a language] the most correct rule) is that for nouns, you just put the apostrophe at the end.  So, " kids' " and " parents' " would be right. 

However, for Proper Nouns such as a person's name, you must add the extra "s".  For example: " Chris's "

The nouns you cite are both plurals. If they were singular, you could use either way, just like for names:

The bus' tire was flat.
The bus's tire was flat.
Jesus' story was fictional.
Jesus's story was fictional.

Oops!  Good eye.

Still, I've never heard of " Jesus' " being acceptable.

Offline Yu_Bumsuk

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Re: Kill the Apostrophe
« Reply #23 on: November 19, 2011, 07:45:26 AM »
Thanks for the replys!
I didn't know both possessive examples were considered acceptable. I imagine it depends on where you're from as to how we were most likely taught. I guess I heard "Chris' " first and it stuck.

Cheers.

The most widely known rule (and therefore [I suppose, to those who need a "correct" way of using a language] the most correct rule) is that for nouns, you just put the apostrophe at the end.  So, " kids' " and " parents' " would be right. 

However, for Proper Nouns such as a person's name, you must add the extra "s".  For example: " Chris's "

The nouns you cite are both plurals. If they were singular, you could use either way, just like for names:

The bus' tire was flat.
The bus's tire was flat.
Jesus' story was fictional.
Jesus's story was fictional.

Oops!  Good eye.

Still, I've never heard of " Jesus' " being acceptable.

http://bible.cc/john/2-1.htm

"On the third day a wedding took place at Cana in Galilee. Jesus' mother was there,"

It took one Google search.

Offline DejaVu

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Re: Kill the Apostrophe
« Reply #24 on: November 19, 2011, 10:27:51 PM »
Thanks for the replys!
I didn't know both possessive examples were considered acceptable. I imagine it depends on where you're from as to how we were most likely taught. I guess I heard "Chris' " first and it stuck.

Cheers.

The most widely known rule (and therefore [I suppose, to those who need a "correct" way of using a language] the most correct rule) is that for nouns, you just put the apostrophe at the end.  So, " kids' " and " parents' " would be right. 

However, for Proper Nouns such as a person's name, you must add the extra "s".  For example: " Chris's "

The nouns you cite are both plurals. If they were singular, you could use either way, just like for names:

The bus' tire was flat.
The bus's tire was flat.
Jesus' story was fictional.
Jesus's story was fictional.

Oops!  Good eye.

Still, I've never heard of " Jesus' " being acceptable.

http://bible.cc/john/2-1.htm

"On the third day a wedding took place at Cana in Galilee. Jesus' mother was there,"

It took one Google search.

You're so cool. Seriously, why are you such a jerkface?  Were you offended by the "Good eye." or "I never heard..." remark?  It shouldn't have been either.

But, if you're going to continue giving modern-day English lessons, how 'bout quoting Shakespeare next time...
« Last Edit: November 19, 2011, 10:31:14 PM by Qu'est-cequec'est »

Offline Yu_Bumsuk

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Re: Kill the Apostrophe
« Reply #25 on: November 20, 2011, 12:25:30 PM »
Thanks for the replys!
I didn't know both possessive examples were considered acceptable. I imagine it depends on where you're from as to how we were most likely taught. I guess I heard "Chris' " first and it stuck.

Cheers.

The most widely known rule (and therefore [I suppose, to those who need a "correct" way of using a language] the most correct rule) is that for nouns, you just put the apostrophe at the end.  So, " kids' " and " parents' " would be right. 

However, for Proper Nouns such as a person's name, you must add the extra "s".  For example: " Chris's "

The nouns you cite are both plurals. If they were singular, you could use either way, just like for names:

The bus' tire was flat.
The bus's tire was flat.
Jesus' story was fictional.
Jesus's story was fictional.

Oops!  Good eye.

Still, I've never heard of " Jesus' " being acceptable.

http://bible.cc/john/2-1.htm

"On the third day a wedding took place at Cana in Galilee. Jesus' mother was there,"

It took one Google search.

You're so cool. Seriously, why are you such a jerkface?  Were you offended by the "Good eye." or "I never heard..." remark?  It shouldn't have been either.

But, if you're going to continue giving modern-day English lessons, how 'bout quoting Shakespeare next time...

Chill. I'm just being a grammar snob. It's actually quite easy - as easy as catching me on my frequent typos and spelling mistakes. The apostrophe is probably the most simple thing to get one's head around.

Offline VanIslander

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Re: Kill the Apostrophe
« Reply #26 on: November 20, 2011, 02:22:21 PM »
we've already *beep* the semi-colon