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Author Topic: CELTA/DELTA Information  (Read 60783 times)

Offline sweetjane2011

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #80 on: February 05, 2013, 03:26:18 PM »
Has anyone completed a part-time CELTA course in Seoul? And if so, where???? I've looked into it and it seems like there are/were only 2 places that offer it. British Council, although they're held during the day on a Tuesday and Thursday, which I can't make seeing as I teach during the day.

The International Graduate School apparently no longer offers CELTA courses as a trainer left. I called to check after a link on their website got me nowhere.

So...now I'm at a loss. Where can I do a CELTA course part-time, at the evenings and weekends, that's in Seoul? I work at a public elementary school so I have a ton of free time, and I'm thinking about returning to Europe or Hong Kong once my contract here finishes.  Or should I just give up???  :sad:

Online eggieguffer

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #81 on: February 05, 2013, 08:55:45 PM »
Yes it's funny that the vast majority of people who do the CELTA have good things to say about the tutors and the course but there's always one or two who don't. Just as, if you speak to a CELTA trainer they will always have a good story or two about the misfits on the course who just didn't get it. Speaking from experience, CELTA trainers would love to pass everyone on the course - it'd make their lives a lot easier - but sometimes it's just a step too far. DELTA is different as when trainees get to that stage they're comfortable getting feedback, positive or otherwise, they know it's nothing personal and know to pass the practical they have to have most things spot on. So trainers don't feel they have to tread so carefully.

I'm sure rjenman isn't still around but if he were I'd tell him that 'speaking' is not a legitimate lesson aim, in any respect as it's far too non specific. CELTA, or indeed any teacher trainers, are big on aims as that's what drives the lesson. I'd also tell him that just because a lesson plan looks ok on paper doesn't guarantee a pass on the course. One of the criteria for passing is that the teacher should be able to adapt the lesson if something isn't working and blindly following a seemingly good plan that the students aren't responding to can also result in a fail.

Finally he may have a point about technology but that is usually the training centre's fault not the trainers. Courses are carried out in a working school - they have to be so the trainees can have real students to practise on - and trainers' demands for free class rooms, IT facilities and the like are obviously in competition with the side of the centre that probably makes more money. I'd hesitate to say you get what you pay for but most people do the CELTA in Thailand for financial reasons  so it shouldn't be entirely unexpected. 

Offline Suza

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #82 on: February 06, 2013, 07:59:35 AM »
Has anyone completed a part-time CELTA course in Seoul? And if so, where???? I've looked into it and it seems like there are/were only 2 places that offer it. British Council, although they're held during the day on a Tuesday and Thursday, which I can't make seeing as I teach during the day.

The International Graduate School apparently no longer offers CELTA courses as a trainer left. I called to check after a link on their website got me nowhere.

So...now I'm at a loss. Where can I do a CELTA course part-time, at the evenings and weekends, that's in Seoul? I work at a public elementary school so I have a ton of free time, and I'm thinking about returning to Europe or Hong Kong once my contract here finishes.  Or should I just give up???  :sad:

My friend is about to take an online CELTA and then she will complete either 1 or 2 weeks (not sure exactly) in Madrid of teaching practice and observation.

It's worth emailing British Council Seoul and asking them for advice. I'm led to believe that the online CELTA is a fairly new thing.

Offline Suza

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #83 on: February 06, 2013, 08:16:59 AM »
Yes it's funny that the vast majority of people who do the CELTA have good things to say about the tutors and the course but there's always one or two who don't. Just as, if you speak to a CELTA trainer they will always have a good story or two about the misfits on the course who just didn't get it. Speaking from experience, CELTA trainers would love to pass everyone on the course - it'd make their lives a lot easier - but sometimes it's just a step too far. DELTA is different as when trainees get to that stage they're comfortable getting feedback, positive or otherwise, they know it's nothing personal and know to pass the practical they have to have most things spot on. So trainers don't feel they have to tread so carefully.

I'm sure rjenman isn't still around but if he were I'd tell him that 'speaking' is not a legitimate lesson aim, in any respect as it's far too non specific. CELTA, or indeed any teacher trainers, are big on aims as that's what drives the lesson. I'd also tell him that just because a lesson plan looks ok on paper doesn't guarantee a pass on the course. One of the criteria for passing is that the teacher should be able to adapt the lesson if something isn't working and blindly following a seemingly good plan that the students aren't responding to can also result in a fail.

Finally he may have a point about technology but that is usually the training centre's fault not the trainers. Courses are carried out in a working school - they have to be so the trainees can have real students to practise on - and trainers' demands for free class rooms, IT facilities and the like are obviously in competition with the side of the centre that probably makes more money. I'd hesitate to say you get what you pay for but most people do the CELTA in Thailand for financial reasons  so it shouldn't be entirely unexpected.

I didn't particulary like my tutors at all. I found them to be bullies at the best of times and clearly picked their favourites from our group.
Out of the 8 females on the course, I was the only one not to cry.

What I couldn't understand is that those who had failed teaching practices and also got bad marks on their lesson planning got the same Pass grades as everyone else who had not failed anything, like myself and others on the course.
I found that somewhat unfair, why there was no distinction between us.

The CELTA tutors also didn't much like the fact that a few of us already had teaching experience.

Online eggieguffer

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #84 on: February 06, 2013, 09:08:36 AM »
Quote
I didn't particulary like my tutors at all. I found them to be bullies at the best of times and clearly picked their favourites from our group.
Out of the 8 females on the course, I was the only one not to cry.

What I couldn't understand is that those who had failed teaching practices and also got bad marks on their lesson planning got the same Pass grades as everyone else who had not failed anything, like myself and others on the course.
I found that somewhat unfair, why there was no distinction between us.

The CELTA tutors also didn't much like the fact that a few of us already had teaching experience.

Sorry to hear that. Where did you do it?

Offline Suza

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #85 on: February 06, 2013, 09:22:24 AM »
Quote
I didn't particulary like my tutors at all. I found them to be bullies at the best of times and clearly picked their favourites from our group.
Out of the 8 females on the course, I was the only one not to cry.

What I couldn't understand is that those who had failed teaching practices and also got bad marks on their lesson planning got the same Pass grades as everyone else who had not failed anything, like myself and others on the course.
I found that somewhat unfair, why there was no distinction between us.

The CELTA tutors also didn't much like the fact that a few of us already had teaching experience.

Sorry to hear that. Where did you do it?

Liverpool, UK

Maybe it was a case of clashed personalities.

Offline sweetjane2011

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #86 on: February 06, 2013, 01:16:04 PM »
Has anyone completed a part-time CELTA course in Seoul? And if so, where???? I've looked into it and it seems like there are/were only 2 places that offer it. British Council, although they're held during the day on a Tuesday and Thursday, which I can't make seeing as I teach during the day.

The International Graduate School apparently no longer offers CELTA courses as a trainer left. I called to check after a link on their website got me nowhere.

So...now I'm at a loss. Where can I do a CELTA course part-time, at the evenings and weekends, that's in Seoul? I work at a public elementary school so I have a ton of free time, and I'm thinking about returning to Europe or Hong Kong once my contract here finishes.  Or should I just give up???  :sad:

My friend is about to take an online CELTA and then she will complete either 1 or 2 weeks (not sure exactly) in Madrid of teaching practice and observation.

It's worth emailing British Council Seoul and asking them for advice. I'm led to believe that the online CELTA is a fairly new thing.

I called the British Council in Seoul and they told me it's possible to do an online CELTA, although you still have to be observed teaching, and this is only possible in certain countries, not Korea. So now it looks as though getting my CELTA in Korea is pretty much impossible. I suppose I'll have to do it when I go home. Lame  :sad:

Offline Suza

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #87 on: February 06, 2013, 01:20:20 PM »
Has anyone completed a part-time CELTA course in Seoul? And if so, where???? I've looked into it and it seems like there are/were only 2 places that offer it. British Council, although they're held during the day on a Tuesday and Thursday, which I can't make seeing as I teach during the day.

The International Graduate School apparently no longer offers CELTA courses as a trainer left. I called to check after a link on their website got me nowhere.

So...now I'm at a loss. Where can I do a CELTA course part-time, at the evenings and weekends, that's in Seoul? I work at a public elementary school so I have a ton of free time, and I'm thinking about returning to Europe or Hong Kong once my contract here finishes.  Or should I just give up???  :sad:

My friend is about to take an online CELTA and then she will complete either 1 or 2 weeks (not sure exactly) in Madrid of teaching practice and observation.

It's worth emailing British Council Seoul and asking them for advice. I'm led to believe that the online CELTA is a fairly new thing.

I called the British Council in Seoul and they told me it's possible to do an online CELTA, although you still have to be observed teaching, and this is only possible in certain countries, not Korea. So now it looks as though getting my CELTA in Korea is pretty much impossible. I suppose I'll have to do it when I go home. Lame  :sad:

The observation is only for 1-2 weeks tho, right?

Is there no chance you could do part of it online and do the observed practice later? Also, maybe you could speak to your school and see if they'd release you during that deskwarming period and go off and do it in one of the countries.
It would save you money in the long run as you'd be employed.

When I did mine I had course costs (1250 pounds), loss of earnings and 1 month of living costs. It adds up!

Offline kingkeiser

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #88 on: March 26, 2013, 02:38:11 PM »
Sorry Jane but either you do it in Thailand or go back to your native country and do your CELTA. I did mine in NYC, just one month before coming back to Korea. Two friends of mine taught in Korea for two years and completed their CELTA's in Thailand afterwards. It will be the most stressful month of your life BUT, it will be worth it. You will have a leg up on the ESL competition.

Offline WestMeetsEast

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #89 on: March 27, 2013, 07:40:48 AM »
Hi

I did my CELTA at International House Newcastle in 2010, I can honestly say it was one of the most rewarding things I've done. The quality of the teaching I received was fantastic, I learnt quickly and even though I was working like 12 hours a day for a lot of it, I didn't mind. I've only been legit teaching in Korea for a week, so I can't attest to how much more or less prepared I was... but I think it's unlikely I would have come here without it. I 100% thoroughly enjoyed doing that qualification, it was one of the best decisions I made, doing that.

Some information: It cost me 800 pounds and it lasted for 4 weeks. I was teaching every other day for most of the course to a mix of late teens and adults mostly from the middle east. While it was at times very hard, I wouldn't say what I was being taught was hard to learn. The work isn't hard, there is just a LOT of it, when you combine the volume of work with the stress of teaching people for the first time, I think that's where people really struggle.


In regards to a DELTA. If I go long term into this teaching business I'd either get a DELTA or a Masters degree. The consistent advice I've been given over this is that if you want to teach in Korea at a higher level and you're going to get one of the two, get a Masters. DELTA qualifications aren't well known or understood here and a Masters degree will put you in much better stead. In places like the Middle East the DELTA is held in very high regard and if you were going to that region it might be wiser (and cheaper) to get that instead. I was told when I did my CELTA that the course is 10 weeks and VERY difficult. Much much harder than the CELTA is.

Honestly, if you're thinking about doing a CELTA and you have the means and access I'd highly recommend it. If you just want a qualification to get into Korea, you can do an online TEFL for a few hundred quid, if you want to learn how to teach, spend the money, do a CELTA.

I would like to post in support of Newcastle International House as well.  The tutors there were beyond helpful and the course was well organised and professional.

Offline Analog

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #90 on: March 27, 2013, 02:17:10 PM »
Hi,

I am just about to finish my MA in applied linguistics this year. In terms of self-development and future career would it also be beneficial to take a CELTA? Could I just jump into a DELTA with an MA? I also have around 7 years teaching experience in japan and korea.

Thanks

Offline Analog

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #91 on: March 28, 2013, 07:55:56 AM »
Hey,

Thanks for the information. It might be a good thing for me to do in terms of practical training or I could just try a PGCE back home in the U.K. instead. I would just like some job security for the future within the TEFL world or beyond.

When you say that the CELTA differs to approaches in Korea and Japan what exactly do you mean?

Online eggieguffer

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #92 on: March 28, 2013, 08:38:22 AM »
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When you say that the CELTA differs to approaches in Korea and Japan what exactly do you mean?

Don't know about Japan but Korean public school classes are very teacher centred. Lots of PPTs at the front, games the whole class plays, kids coming up to perform dialogues etc...Plus lots of L1. This is changing but the methodology on the CELTA is geared towards mutli lingual classes (no L1) and is much more communicative and learner centred. It's also designed for teaching adults.

Offline Analog

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #93 on: March 28, 2013, 09:17:02 AM »
Thanks. I was teaching learner centred and communicative approaches at YBM. The philosophy is great but its application was too rigid, and arguably learner centred. Anyway, I am lucky enough to be teaching at a highschool now where I can do whatever I want. I would love for a purely communicative and learner centred approach to develop learner autonomy. However, there is so much use of L1 by most students in their group work; some have pretty low level speaking ability. And many of them do not seem mature enough to carry out  discussion based tasks. So, I am thinking task based lessons are going to be better. A CELTA might help because of the feedback and observations etc.

Offline DNogitsune

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Re: CELTA courses
« Reply #94 on: August 22, 2013, 12:00:22 PM »
I would really like to have information on this, too. I am still researching in the meantime and will post results.

Offline ManceRayder

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Re: CELTA courses
« Reply #95 on: August 22, 2013, 04:08:02 PM »
I was checking on this a few weeks ago. It looks like the International Graduate School of English may no longer be offering the CELTA. There is no longer any information about it on their website.

Offline minamteacher

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Re: CELTA courses
« Reply #96 on: August 27, 2013, 11:50:45 AM »
My advice from taking CELTA in Canada would be to try to find copies of the books online seeing as you will most likely hardly every crack them open during the class because lesson planning will take over the majority of your time leaving very little time for reading. If I remember correctly there was only one assignment I needed the books for, but it's your 70 000 won if you really will read it.

Offline MayorHaggar

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Re: CELTA courses
« Reply #97 on: August 27, 2013, 01:50:26 PM »
I was told to get the books, but as usual with a lot of college-style classes, I never needed them during the course.

The only book I would definitely get is Swan's Practical English Usage, since it can help for grammar research for some of the projects and some of your lesson plans. And it can be useful for teaching in Korea if you're confused about some grammar stuff, though I don't have to use it too often seeing as how I'm teaching elementary kids.
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Offline kingkeiser

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #98 on: November 04, 2013, 12:24:19 PM »
Do the CELTA first. You are going form a kiddie pool(TEFL) to shark infested waters(DELTA). I did the CELTA in NYC and it was worth every dime!!!

Offline probablylauren

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #99 on: November 04, 2013, 03:24:56 PM »
just as a side note the British Council is offering online course next year
http://www.britishcouncil.kr/en/cambridge-celta

You still have some in-class components and meetings but the requirements for actually being somewhere are a little bit less. Or might be feasible if your timetable at school is good or you have a flexible school willing to accommodate your professional development (i know some aren't but some schools are like this)

just fyi. I'm considering it depending on my future graduate school plans
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