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Author Topic: CELTA/DELTA Information  (Read 60782 times)

Offline Flame Trees

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Re: CELTA courses
« Reply #60 on: June 29, 2011, 10:19:46 AM »
Bumping - ;D I want to know, too!

Offline Brian

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Re: CELTA courses
« Reply #61 on: June 29, 2011, 11:24:42 AM »
I took it in Seoul in January 2010 at the International Graduate School of English (near Olympic Park).  Here are the details: http://edulife.igse.ac.kr/curriculum/curriculum_3.asp

I found it practical and informative, and I would definitely recommend it to anyone interested in teaching.  I don't consider the instructors petty or bureaucratic at all, and I was glad to meet both them and the other 12 classmates. 

I took a four-week intensive course.  It was a challenge and the days were long (a few hours a sleep a night throughout the thing), but I made it through.  Half of the day is devoted to teaching practice and to observing your classmates teach---to classes of adult learners---and the other half consists of lectures from the CELTA instructors.   The reading wasn't too heavy (at least compared to what I did as an English major), and the writing assignments were pretty small (1,000 words or less), but what took up the most amount of time for me was lesson planning and creating extremely detailed plans for submission to the instructors beforehand.   

Because I lived in Gwangju (Jeollanam-do) at the time I rented a room in a goshiwon about a block away for something like 300,000 for the month.  A small room but a good deal, especially since my other classmates were spending 30 to 60 minutes commuting each way.   I can provide details later for those interested.

There are part-time options available, too, but if you have the time I think it's better to completely devote a month to it rather than spread it out over three months.
« Last Edit: June 29, 2011, 11:32:06 AM by Brian »
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Offline Miss S

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Re: CELTA courses
« Reply #62 on: June 29, 2011, 12:39:38 PM »
Brian did you have to buy a text book or something like that as well?  Or was it provided in the course?

Offline Brian

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Re: CELTA courses
« Reply #63 on: June 29, 2011, 05:53:21 PM »
I had to buy two textbooks. I don't recall the names (Google might tell you), but they cost about 70,000 won together.   
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Offline anigerla

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Re: CELTA courses
« Reply #64 on: July 06, 2011, 11:37:54 AM »
How were you able to take a month-long course? Did you use your vacation time or take time off work? I want to do it but I only have 3 weeks in winter...

Offline SpaceRook

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Re: CELTA courses
« Reply #65 on: July 06, 2011, 12:05:27 PM »
Has anyone studied a CELTA course in Seoul? There seems to be a number of institutes that offer it and I am wondering what everyone's experiences were? Was it as intensive as they make out? A lot of people complain on the internet that instructors are often petty and bureaucratic. Hopefully, this isn't the case at any of the institute in Seoul.

I'm not sure what people mean by "petty and bureaucratic."  The CELTA teaches you specific teaching styles.  To succeed in the course, you must demonstrate that you understand the styles.  If you treat your teaching sessions like a 40-student middle-school Korean classroom, you WILL do poorly.   In fact, it is usually experienced teachers that have the most trouble adjusting to the CELTA.  If you can just let go and try something new, you'll be fine.     

Offline Miss S

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Re: CELTA courses
« Reply #66 on: July 07, 2011, 01:54:29 PM »
How were you able to take a month-long course? Did you use your vacation time or take time off work? I want to do it but I only have 3 weeks in winter...
Yeah I was wondering a bit about this too.   
I wonder if my school would allow me to take 3 weeks + 1 unpaid week over January to do CELTA?

Offline Brian

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Re: CELTA courses
« Reply #67 on: July 09, 2011, 02:52:37 AM »
My contract was finished and my semester of Korean-study was finished, so I had time to do it (because of the visa-waiver program I could stay 90 days after leaving and re-entering the country).   This was back in January 2010, and really a lot has changed based on what I've read here, but there were a few public school teachers who could do it because their schools let them take a month off, free from desk-warming.  (That used to be more common, evidentally).  Also a few university teachers on winter break.  Also a hagwon teacher who was going to class 8 to 5 and then teaching in the evenings (not recommended).

If you look into the January session, you might check with your co-teacher and your local whitey-wrangler to see if you could get a month free from desk-warming and winter camps in order to do it.  It's "professional development," what we're supposed to be doing anyway and what Korean teachers get to do from home, though I know the CELTA isn't known or really recognized here.  That's why I think talking to your local coordinator might be more productive than trying to talk with your co-teacher or principal.
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Offline matthews_world

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Re: CELTA courses
« Reply #68 on: July 09, 2011, 06:03:06 AM »
There are more threads on this that can be found on our competitors discussion forum.

In the meantime, a couple of books were suggested to give oneself a leg-up and to read, digest before the course:

James Scrivener "Learning Teaching"

Jeremy Harmer "The Practice of Eng. Lang. Teaching"

Does anyone know if these can be found in bookstores here in Korea?  They're only available 'used' on Amazon at the moment.

I'm taking a break from the PS BS and taking the part-time option (10-weeks) with Int'l House in Bangkok or Pattaya which is cheaper and has lower-cost of living.  I'm anticipating a budget of $4,000 should be enough for the course, housing with a family (keep myself from partying too much, etc.), meals and incidentals and hope to find part-time employment to recoup living expenses during the less-intensive course.

I'm trying to get out of Korea and ultimately train teachers.

And Brian, what were the two coursebook titles that they gave you for Seoul?

Offline Brian

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Re: CELTA courses
« Reply #69 on: July 10, 2011, 07:56:09 AM »
These are the ones we had to read . . .

Either:
Jeremy Harmer - How to Teach English (new edition) - Pearson Longman   OR

Jim Scrivener   -  Learning Teaching (second edition)  - Macmillan


And either:

 
Martin Parrot - Grammar for English Language Teachers - CUP  OR

Michael Swan - Practical English Usage - OUP
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Offline Hoosier_Jedi

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Re: CELTA courses
« Reply #70 on: July 10, 2011, 03:32:44 PM »
Anyone done that course one offered by The British Council? I've been thinking about it.

Offline jarena2

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #71 on: December 07, 2011, 10:01:16 AM »
I don't know if this has been mentioned elsewhere but word just came down from on high that IEPIC staff (not just SEPIC!) will all need certifications before new hires/contract renewal.

If this isn't the way other provinces are already, I bet they'll follow suit soon.

Offline peddyjoonam

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #72 on: January 29, 2012, 02:38:56 PM »
Is there a collective of countries and/or cities where CELTA can be applied?

Offline rjenman

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #73 on: February 24, 2012, 12:11:45 AM »
Don't do your CELTA with ECC, if at all.

For a start, the equipment is below par. All of the computers are set up with Thai as the default language that you have to switch every time you open a seperate programme, All of the computers are set up with different programmes that don't work in different ways (different versions of windows, different default programmes for images etc), the internet doesn't work properly sometimes, and they blame it on it being a “developing country” even though they're the only c*nts on the f*cking block with a toilet that accepts toilet paper, just so they can wipe their privileged English assh*les. Each room has separate air conditioning, but the fat, sarcastic, condescending tutors still blame it on the “fact” that its a “developing” country. Eat sh*t and die.


Most people who fail just call the course “harsh,” and nothing more. There's quite a bit more to it.


Everyone who passes is just happy to have the CELTA certificate, and had to kiss a lot of ass and bite their tongue and work very hard. What you gain is all of the reasonably positive things that you can gain from someone who is a c*nt with a lot of teaching experience and knowledge being really negative toward you after judging you from a lot of lessons. If this sounds like something you could benefit from, do it, but its a load of bullsh*t.


The tutors are totally idealistic and incoherent. I got failed on a lesson that had “speaking” as a secondary aim. I provided 15 minutes of speaking exercise in partners, all of which involved the second partner to be listening to the speaker and making value judgments about what they're saying. (a guessing game). These people are so idealistic that a “listening exercise” is exactly as they teach, and intermediate Thais spending 15 minutes speaking to one another doesn't involve any “listening.”


My tutors looked at the draft of my lesson plan before a lesson that I gave, and approved the plan, and then in feedback told me that I shouldn't have done the plan that I did. I failed my final teaching practise where the second tutor, who had looked at my draft two times and given it the O.K., on the day decided to fail me because I didn't do an ENTIRE SECTION THAT WAS REQUIRED. EVEN THOUGH HE APPROVED OF 2 LESSON PLAN DRAFTS THE DAY BEFORE, AND THE DAY BEFORE THE DAY BEFORE, BOTH OF WHICH DIDN'T HAVE THE SECTION.


All of the students who get failed are a suprise to the other students.


The first tutor failed me similarly on a teaching practise. The difference here was that he actually invented and dictated to me my lesson plan.


All of the students who go through the course have to kiss ass. The tutors are not negotiable and frequently sarcastic and personal, and take advantage of the fact that you've paid a lot of money and need the CELTA. “I don't have to please you” kind of attitude prevailed, although the tutors were admittedly quite nice for the rest of the time.


Quite a lot of the content was similarly abstract and incoherent. We spent an hour learning the difference between an “Exercise” and an “Activity” and the tutors assign real value to these differences . Problem is, the tutors have random interpretations themselves and contradicted one another, which the tutor was pulled up on, and he laughed it off.


The reason why so many people say not to argue with them isn't because they know a lot and are constantly correcting people, but because they aren't sensible people. All of their value judgements are based simply on whatever random negativity they feel like spewing up, and is usually incoherent in some way.


I had quite a few negative comments on my lesson plan that were addressed a few lines down in the plan, and he didn’t cross any of the comments out.


All people who do the CELTA give you the advice “don't argue with them” for a reason. You will want to argue with them, because their arguments aren't sound and usually condescending, personal and reasonably ignorant. They got their degrees from being uptight and anal, not from being useful, and are riding off the name of “cambridge.”




It's not possible for students to always be wrong. You should really doubt the integrity of a teacher who is teaching something that isn't set in stone that has no clear answer, where its common that people give you advice “don't argue with them,” because its quite clear that a lot of people want to argue with them, and usually have a very valid point.


The first thing that struck me about the ECC CELTA was the general quality of the candidates who went into the course. Really smart, hardworking people, some with experience. All of whom were arguing over points with the tutors.


What this boils down to is that the tutors aren't problem solvers. They thrive on problems, and everything they have a problem with is a really random, emotional gripe that doesn't have much of a bearing on the situation.

Offline jblissie

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #74 on: March 02, 2012, 09:00:45 AM »
I was really satisfied with my experiences from doing CELTA. I learned a lot and if you go in with an open mind and are willing to adapt to the courses methods, then it should be fine. I would recommend it to anyone.

I have heard how intense DELTA is. It can be done in 10 weeks or over a year. I was told that you really need to clear your life of any distractions if you choose to it in 10 weeks because it is full time (same with CELTA really). You don't really need DELTA unless you plan on training teachers.

Offline Kucifus

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #75 on: March 09, 2012, 12:41:58 PM »
Hi

I did my CELTA at International House Newcastle in 2010, I can honestly say it was one of the most rewarding things I've done. The quality of the teaching I received was fantastic, I learnt quickly and even though I was working like 12 hours a day for a lot of it, I didn't mind. I've only been legit teaching in Korea for a week, so I can't attest to how much more or less prepared I was... but I think it's unlikely I would have come here without it. I 100% thoroughly enjoyed doing that qualification, it was one of the best decisions I made, doing that.

Some information: It cost me 800 pounds and it lasted for 4 weeks. I was teaching every other day for most of the course to a mix of late teens and adults mostly from the middle east. While it was at times very hard, I wouldn't say what I was being taught was hard to learn. The work isn't hard, there is just a LOT of it, when you combine the volume of work with the stress of teaching people for the first time, I think that's where people really struggle.


In regards to a DELTA. If I go long term into this teaching business I'd either get a DELTA or a Masters degree. The consistent advice I've been given over this is that if you want to teach in Korea at a higher level and you're going to get one of the two, get a Masters. DELTA qualifications aren't well known or understood here and a Masters degree will put you in much better stead. In places like the Middle East the DELTA is held in very high regard and if you were going to that region it might be wiser (and cheaper) to get that instead. I was told when I did my CELTA that the course is 10 weeks and VERY difficult. Much much harder than the CELTA is.

Honestly, if you're thinking about doing a CELTA and you have the means and access I'd highly recommend it. If you just want a qualification to get into Korea, you can do an online TEFL for a few hundred quid, if you want to learn how to teach, spend the money, do a CELTA.

Offline Happyhan

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #76 on: March 20, 2012, 06:57:09 PM »
I have found this thread really interesting as I am currently applying to do the CELTA.

The course I have found in Manchester is £1350, which is where I would be based in England, however I'm going traveling and will be going via Thailand on my way back to England- I looked at doing the CELTA there. There are two courses with dates that suit me- one is International House, but works out the same cost as the course in Manchester, and the other one which is considerably less is with ECC...

SpaceRook first mentioned ECC and didn't mention anything negative, however rjenman couldn't say anything more negative about it.

rjenman- which branch of ECC did you do the CELTA and when did you do it?

Offline keirdre

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #77 on: March 21, 2012, 10:28:25 AM »
+1 for the CELTA course in Oxford.  It was brilliantly run, very engaging and one of the best educational experiences of my life!  Hard work, but really enjoyed it.  Cannot praise it highly enough.  1000GBP is a pretty big chunk of money (live in Oxford, so at least I didn't have to pay accommodation) but it was super.

Offline LeanTeacher

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #78 on: March 21, 2012, 10:33:21 AM »
No offense but TEFL and DELTA are worlds apart. TEFL is a great starting point but the courses vary in quality and content.  CELTA teaches you a very specific and effective style of teaching and planning lessons, as a continuation of this the DELTA will expect you to be delivering lessons and submitting plans in that specific style and to that standard from the moment you start.

I recommend doing your CELTA first, it's stressful but worth every penny. Then spend 2 years perfecting your CELTA teaching and then think about DELTA.

Hope this helps.

As a newbie, I've wondered about the difference between the TEFL and CELTA, and hadn't even heard of the DELTA. This gives me a better idea of what to expect - Thanks!

Offline Freeto

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #79 on: March 21, 2012, 08:39:49 PM »
I did my CELTA at ECC in Phuket. The money was well worth it, IMO. The trainers knew their stuff and were on point about what the students did right and what needed improvement. Yes, the computers weren't the latest and greatest but they were just fine for Powerpoint and Word and were connected to the internet.

I have found this thread really interesting as I am currently applying to do the CELTA.

The course I have found in Manchester is £1350, which is where I would be based in England, however I'm going traveling and will be going via Thailand on my way back to England- I looked at doing the CELTA there. There are two courses with dates that suit me- one is International House, but works out the same cost as the course in Manchester, and the other one which is considerably less is with ECC...

SpaceRook first mentioned ECC and didn't mention anything negative, however rjenman couldn't say anything more negative about it.

rjenman- which branch of ECC did you do the CELTA and when did you do it?
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