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Author Topic: CELTA/DELTA Information  (Read 60785 times)

Offline SpaceRook

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #20 on: January 05, 2011, 09:53:01 AM »
I took the CELTA in Bangkok in late 2009. 

It is a rigorous experience, but if you treat it like any other job, you'll be fine.  The problem some people have is that they are usually in a new and exciting city, and they fail to keep up with the work and don't take it seriously.  There can be serious information overload at times, especially if you are new to teaching (as I was).  My #1 piece of advice: stay on top of it.

The course is focused at adult learners.  It's excellent in that regard.  Some of what you learn isn't that applicable to children.  They just don't have the patience for it.  The center I took the course with (ECC) did have a free bonus week about teaching young learners.  I took that and found it helpful.

Re: pandering to the tutors.  I wouldn't call it *pandering*, but if you completely ignore everything they teach you and just do your own thing, you will have problems.  In fact, sometimes the people with the most problems are experienced teachers.  They find it hard to adapt to the CELTA teaching strategies.  The tutors love to see you take their advice.  That's the point of training, isn't it?

Overall, it was a beneficial experience.  It gave me the confidence to walk into a classroom and teach.  I think the teaching environment is great: 10 or 12 adult learners who want to be there.  My only frustration is that a lot of what I learned can't be used in a classroom with 40 kids. 

I'm happy to answer any specific questions you have. 



« Last Edit: January 05, 2011, 09:54:34 AM by SpaceRook »

Offline bern

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #21 on: January 05, 2011, 09:56:31 AM »
It's not about pandering to the trainers at all, CELTA provides you with a very effective set of guidelines, it's a teaching system and it works.

Listen to what you are being told (after all you're paying for it) show that you have understood it in your planning and do it in your teaching practice. You will also be working in a small team so be supportive of the other people, it can be a lot of work.

If you go in thinking, you're the greatest teacher in the world and that you're going to shake things up with your radical style, it's not going to work out for you. Make sure you hit your action points on the course and then get experimental when its all over.

I enjoyed my CELTA immensely and found it to be the most valuable course I have taken. Looking forward to my DELTA next.

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Offline vitamin-d

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #22 on: January 05, 2011, 10:06:55 AM »
Thanks. What you both have said has reaffirmed what I've been thinking about the course. Perhaps pandering was the wrong word to use. What I meant is exactly what you said, that you are there to be taught a very useful method for tutoring and the trainers want to see you use and commit to it. I have heard that it's the older, more set in their ways teachers that struggle. I am young and fresh to teaching and yearn for this kind of experience to help me educate learners in the best possible way.

However, my main concern is about the grammar side of things.
I'd consider myself to have a low-intermediate knowledge. Would you recommend seriously brushing up before the course or is everything included at a reasonable enough pace to digest?

   
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Offline RufusW

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #23 on: January 05, 2011, 10:11:14 AM »
Great question about grammar vitamin.

I'm wondering whether you could summarize the type of teaching a CELTA course advocates.  Is it communicative and task based?
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Offline SpaceRook

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #24 on: January 05, 2011, 11:05:59 AM »
However, my main concern is about the grammar side of things.
I'd consider myself to have a low-intermediate knowledge. Would you recommend seriously brushing up before the course or is everything included at a reasonable enough pace to digest?

Grammar is what everyone worries the most about...and it's probably one of the least important things in the course.  I don't recommend studying grammar that much before the course.  In fact, in the CELTA, you will have sessions on grammar.  The major thing to practice is language awareness.  You will likely get a pre-course task that helps you with this.  If you want a small sample, check out ECC's CELTA packet and look at the pre-interview task (2009CELTA.doc).  It lists some things to think about re: language awareness.

After you teach, there is a feedback session.  Your tutor and the other students will give you advice: what you did well, what needs improvement, etc...  Rarely was grammar even mentioned with my group.  The big things were maximizing student talking time (this is Number #1 with all the tutors), using the concepts taught in the course, board work, and using simple language that students can understand.

I'm not saying grammar is unimportant.  But really, it's about #7 on the Top 10 list of things you should worry about in the CELTA course.



Offline bern

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #25 on: January 05, 2011, 11:45:17 AM »
Good advice,

Whilst they are not testing you on your grammar, this is a great opportunity to get it up to scratch.

You will be required to teach grammar points so get a copy of 'Essential Grammar in Use' by Raymond Murphy, CELTA recommended and an excellent resource for any teacher. This book explains grammar points very simply, just teach yourself the
point you will cover when you are planning the lesson.

CELTA plans include a language analyisis sheet for grammar so you will have to pretty much rewrite the info from this book into your plan anyway.

One of the funny things about CELTA is that other trainees may not be native speakers and their grammar will be ten times better than yours as they have studied it when they learned the language! So prepare to be schooled and feel slightly humiliated and take it graciously!

The one thing I would recommend you brush up on before you go is your tenses. The pre-course task will cover these, it isn't mandatory but I highly recommend you do it, it only takes about an hour.
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Offline axel pose

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #26 on: January 06, 2011, 10:40:22 AM »

As far as grammar and the CELTA goes the best advice I can give is this: Concentrate more on getting your students talking in both controlled and free activities.  That's what gets you the merit/distinction grade.  I did my CELTA 6 years ago and I've learned that just focusing on grammar is not beneficial to the students.   

Familiarize yourself with the PPP/ESA lesson framework and it's fundamentals, then look at guided discovery frameworks.  If you do this then you will sail through the practical side of the CELTA. 

I'd also say an understanding of phonics and the IPA would serve you better than an in-depth knowledge of grammar. 

Lastly, forget the Swann book - "Practical English Usage" it's not user friendly.  Focus on Harmer - The practice of English language teaching,  M Parrot - Grammar for English teachers, Thornbury - How to teach grammar and The resourceful English teacher, can't remember the author. 

Those books will see you through the course no problem. 

Offline lefty12

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #27 on: January 06, 2011, 10:44:14 AM »
Do the CELTA course. It's one of the best courses around. I found the course a little difficult at first but as long as you realise don't take things the trainers say personally then you will be fine.

It is a learning experience. One of the best things I have ever done. Remember many people will be in the same boat as you so don't worry.

Offline rainesbaines

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #28 on: January 07, 2011, 12:40:14 PM »
I've been yearning to get over to Germany/Europe for a while so I am doing the CELTA course in Frankfurt this March.  After two years teaching elementary in Korea, I am stoked to work toward some serious teaching.  Finding a nice amount of work in Germany is going to be a bit of a challenge, from what I've heard, but I figure it's worth a shot.

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Offline KiddieCAT

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #29 on: January 08, 2011, 08:14:37 PM »

I strongly considered taking CELTA last summer between contracts, but in the end, didn't have the money for it. If anyone's interested in taking it here (as you can do a PT course, but I've heard it's not recommended due to its intense nature) you can take it at the British Council for around 2.5 mil or you can take it at the International Graduate School of English for a little cheaper (located on line 5 at Dunchon-dong metro).  The pre-task wasn't difficult, but since Korea (unfortunately) doesn't pay more for CELTA, for financial reasons I did a TESOL certificate instead.  Eventually I want to get the CELTA and teach in Europe if I could find the demand.

On the other hand I've heard some mixed reviews about CELTA and it's practicality in the classroom. The lesson that i was walked through in the interview would take hours to prep for. Not that I don't spend longer prepping than teaching, but it would have taken serious time. I suppose it's dependant on the person though.



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Offline sambelina78

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #30 on: January 10, 2011, 02:49:47 PM »
I did CELTA in the UK whilst working full time. It cost around £1000. It was not massively hard academically (if you coped with your degree you should cope with CELTA), but it was hard to juggle full time job commitments, social life and studying. my social life almost went out the window for those 6 months (had to do part time course cos of job).

there are written assignments to do as well as the practical teaching elements. everything is intense and thorough. the grammar part is hard, but you can easily cope with it with little pre-reading although i wish i had done some. Raymond Murphy is probably one of the best grammar Gurus on the market, try to get hold of one of his practical English usage books if you can. the tutors will give you a load of information, but it's all useful.

you have to submit lesson plans to the tutors for every practical session you do - and i found they liked detail. they also liked justification on why you have chosen a particular activity, for every activity. always think WHY, WHY, WHY when you are planning. at the beginning it took me ages to plan each lesson, even if i was only given a 15 minute slot to teach. this was because of the detail of the lesson plans. i had to produce the lesson plan, the aims of the lesson and anything i hope to improve upon, or pitfalls i might foresee. i had to produce a breakdown of all the grammar i was introducing and any new vocab - definitions written down and any pictures of necessary. i had to produce copies of all the worksheets i was giving the students, or any of the activities (e.g. flash cards, matching cards etc) for the tutors too. so anything you create for the students make one extra copy for the tutor.

there were 4 written assignments, one of which was in conjunction with a 45 minute teaching session based on authentic materials. it was my best lesson and one of the most detailed i produced, but i enjoyed it a lot. there was also an assignment based on common mistakes that students from certain countries make due to them thinking in their language - e.g. absence of 'a', 'an' and 'the' because their native language does not use articles. that involved interviewing and tape recording a student and then analysing it. i stupidly picked one of the best Japanese students the college had and she barely made any mistakes!!! difficult assignment.

i loved the course, but it was hard work. you have to be prepared to work at it. i liked the fact i was also working at the time because the course did not consume me as much as it could have done. the college tutors told me that some people doing the course full time get really consumed by it and can have a bit of a break down! i was lucky as i worked for the college at the time, in a different department and had access to lots of great resources and a bit of time during the working day for assignments and planning as i could call it 'professional development'!!

good luck to you all if you take it. i think you will enjoy it but it is hard work and you have to take it seriously.
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Offline SeoulPurpose

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #31 on: January 19, 2011, 04:22:34 PM »
The CELTA in Ecuador is a little more expensive, but I'll be in the area anyway.
The course is 5 weeks, rather than 4; is situated on a private beach/eco resort, and the $2250 cost covers the course plus five weeks of accommodation (in private cabañas :D) and all food.

Vitamin D, please post a link to some information on this course. Sounds amazing!

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #32 on: January 19, 2011, 06:11:01 PM »
I've heard many good things spoken about the celta course...the books are great but these days you can even see the authors speaking about teaching on youtube..for example:



Good luck to anybody who decides to do the celta!

Offline hannahlumurphy

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #33 on: February 08, 2011, 08:08:26 AM »
Hi, I took the CELTA course in January to March last year. I really enjoyed the course, and it was challenging but definitely not too difficult. The challenging parts in my experience were the essays, all but one of which I had to resubmit. That's not a big deal, although it is laborious, and I found them hard because I don't enjoy ploughing through all the necessary books (lazy). However got them done in the end.

The other thing that will be challenging for you is if you have fellow students who are difficult to work with. You will be split into groups and have to teach in front of and appraise each other and some people cannot handle this well. Some of my co-students were unreliable in terms of group preparation and delivery too.

However, the pros outweighed the cons for me. It gives you good experience and expects a high standard which only forces you to give your best. I did the course part-time which was full on but manageable for me, I've heard the full-time course is very hard-going for some but again, everyone is different.

Offline vitamin-d

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #34 on: February 08, 2011, 01:43:18 PM »
The CELTA in Ecuador is a little more expensive, but I'll be in the area anyway.
The course is 5 weeks, rather than 4; is situated on a private beach/eco resort, and the $2250 cost covers the course plus five weeks of accommodation (in private cabañas :D) and all food.

Vitamin D, please post a link to some information on this course. Sounds amazing!

Certainly: http://www.celtaecuador.com/
Thanks for all this information, everyone.
I'm certain it will prove to be very useful...

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Offline English Mike

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #35 on: February 14, 2011, 01:24:37 PM »
I did Trinity Cert. Tesol which is similar to CELTA, a couple of teh modules are different.
It was the hardest and most rewarding things i've ever done.
The Trinity Cert. TESOL only prepared for teaching Adults, but this will be useful next year when I escape the Hagwon system.
Good luck in Ecuador, sounds more fun than doing it in rainy England!

Offline KadinG

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #36 on: May 24, 2011, 05:53:52 AM »
I know that the CELTA certification is not required to teach in Korea but I have a few questions about it....

1)  Do you think CELTA should be required to teach in South Korea?
2)  I mostly want to take the CELTA to get experience before I am thrown into a class room.  Is there an alternate cheaper program that I could look into that allows me to gain experience?
3)  If the CELTA program is my best option, is it best to take it in the country where you will be teaching or is it best to go somewhere else (possibly where it is cheaper)?

Thanks so much for any input you can give.

KadinG

Offline Jozigirl

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #37 on: May 24, 2011, 06:30:58 AM »
No x 3

CELTA is only a requirement when the company offers Cambridge exams.  It's a good certificate to have if you're planning to remain an ESL/EFL teacher but otherwise it's an expensive course that doesn't offer much in return.

Offline NMonk

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #38 on: May 24, 2011, 07:21:42 AM »
No x 3

CELTA is only a requirement when the company offers Cambridge exams.  It's a good certificate to have if you're planning to remain an ESL/EFL teacher but otherwise it's an expensive course that doesn't offer much in return.

This is absolutely wrong on so many accounts. CELTA is not only a requirement for companies that offer Cambridge exams. If in the future you were to try and work in West Europe a CELTA is more sought after than an MA TESOL. It's practically impossible to get a real job there with out it. The course isn't that expensive, $1600 for 1 month intensive training. It sounds reasonable to me. Doesn't offer much in return? Making you a significantly better teacher sounds like a good return to me, what kind of return did you want. You will also get paid, on the SMOE pay scale, $200 a month more for having it, but that is also true for other TEFL's, even th waste of time over the web ones.

O.P in answer to your questions:
1) No, although an extremely beneficial course there are other 120 hour in person TESOL certificates which I have also read are good courses.
2)Read reviews, but CELTA is considered the most prestigious entry level qualification and is accepted every where in the world.
3) Go anywhere you like, it makes no difference.
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Offline Suza

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Re: CELTA/DELTA Information
« Reply #39 on: May 24, 2011, 07:23:37 AM »
I disagree! I think it offers a lot in return. For people that are coming straight from university to a teaching job what experience do they have?? they speak English? They have no classroom experience and do not know the first thing about teaching English.

It all depends on where you want to teach. For example, in Europe a CELTA is a minimum requirement! After Korea I intend on returning to Europe and hopefully finding teaching employment there. Without the CELTA less options would be open to me.

With the ESL teaching market now very popular I see it as a valuable qualification to have.

I returned to the UK last October and did it in my home town (Liverpool). It cost 1200 pounds. I was able to stay for free with my family. It requires a lot of work and dedication. It was a really tough 4 weeks.

Evaluate where you see your ESL career going.