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Author Topic: A Disturbing Insight to Laos  (Read 3638 times)

Offline Cereal

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A Disturbing Insight to Laos
« on: October 11, 2011, 07:34:39 PM »
I just watched a short film called "The Most Secret Place On Earth". It's about the US Government's and the CIA's secret bombing of Laos before and during the Vietnam War

I downloaded it from btjunkie. It breaks my heart and makes me want to weep knowing that many of those murdering dogs are still in positions of power. They should be brought up on charges of crimes against humanity

My wife's older brothers and sisters, her mother and aunts and uncles all remember, but they don't talk about it much.

I'm a little angry now and I wish I was home with my wife and family in our little village. Watch it, I think it's important to know. It should make you think about what government's say and do and the belief factor therein.
"The urge to destroy is also a creative urge."
Bakunin

Offline kiwikimchi

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Re: A Disturbing Insight to Laos
« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2011, 07:41:20 PM »
Sadly, this is still happening to this very day in other countries.

Offline joseph921

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Re: A Disturbing Insight to Laos
« Reply #2 on: October 11, 2011, 08:34:41 PM »
"Truth in an empire of lies is treason." - Ron Paul 2012 U.S. Presidential Candidate.  Paul has exposed many lies of the U.S. government, shadow governments, secret societies, and their foreign policies.

Offline Ectofuego

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Re: A Disturbing Insight to Laos
« Reply #3 on: October 11, 2011, 08:43:48 PM »
Thanks for the title, I am almost finished watching the documentary.  Keep in mind that the chinese and russians were also playing a big part on the other side of this secret war.  Many people are to blame for these activities.  It is horribly disappointing that things like these still occur to this day but thanks to hackers and other journalists who have become disgruntled from losing employment, they are coming up in the news sooner than before.  When powerful men battle, only the weak and poor suffer.  :'(
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Offline roentgen15

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Re: A Disturbing Insight to Laos
« Reply #4 on: October 11, 2011, 09:37:39 PM »
Agreeing with Jason Teacher. Don't forget that the Hmong were a pawn in this as well. They continue to suffer ill treatment from Laos due to assisting the USA. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hmong_people#The_.22Secret_War.22

Offline Cereal

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Re: A Disturbing Insight to Laos
« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2011, 06:44:11 AM »
The Hmong got shafted during that time, you're right. My brother in law is Hmong and most of his family got wiped out. He was born at the end of the war so was spared all but the memories. I've been up north to his village, the Hmong are nice people but very rural - even by Lao standards.

As an aside, a movie which depicts the Hmong in a more truthful and accurate light is, "Gran Torino" starring Clint Eastwood.

I watched it and thought it was so amazing I did something I had never done before and wrote a letter to Clint telling him about my brother in law and how I felt his depiction of the Hmong was so nice. A couple of months later I went to check the mail in my PO Box in Vientiane, something I do every 2 or 3 months because no one writes, and there was an envelope from Clint's production company with a signed 8X10 Glossy promo pic from the movie. I framed it and hung it up. I guess Clint didn't get many 'fan' letters from Laos! No guarantees that Clint actually signed it of course, but it wasn't a computer generated signature for sure. I'd like to believe that The Man signed it himself.

Back on point, I don't trust governments anywhere. Even the wimpy, lay down and get kicked, Canadian government.
"The urge to destroy is also a creative urge."
Bakunin

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Re: A Disturbing Insight to Laos
« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2011, 06:51:40 AM »
I saw Gran Torino.  I thought it was a very intense movie.  Eastwook also very accurately portrayed an older generation of Americans. 

Offline Jrong

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Re: A Disturbing Insight to Laos
« Reply #7 on: October 12, 2011, 08:51:52 AM »
It's really beautiful to see something like this posted on an expat teacher's forum...I will definitely check out:  "The Most Secret Place On Earth".

I think my humanist/pacifist neighbour growing up (Don Blas) would agree that much of American foreign policy is evil. He was tortured under a dictatorship propped up by the US. My friend Bah'rit (in Meghalaya) would also say that Indian imperialist policy is the reason many girls in his clan were raped and tortured.

I feel what you feel, man, and I hope people watch docs like this and it makes them f#ing angry. I am not an anarchist, but I think it's so important to really distrust governments in their current form, as you said.

The only problem I have with anger is that unless we have an outlet for that anger, it hurts us more than anything else. I hope you can deal with it in a healthy way...
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Offline Cereal

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Re: A Disturbing Insight to Laos
« Reply #8 on: October 12, 2011, 08:59:03 AM »
It's really beautiful to see something like this posted on an expat teacher's forum...I will definitely check out:  "The Most Secret Place On Earth".

I think my humanist/pacifist neighbour growing up (Don Blas) would agree that much of American foreign policy is evil. He was tortured under a dictatorship propped up by the US. My friend Bah'rit (in Meghalaya) would also say that Indian imperialist policy is the reason many girls in his clan were raped and tortured.

I feel what you feel, man, and I hope people watch docs like this and it makes them f#ing angry. I am not an anarchist, but I think it's so important to really distrust governments in their current form, as you said.

The only problem I have with anger is that unless we have an outlet for that anger, it hurts us more than anything else. I hope you can deal with it in a healthy way...

Yeah, thanks a lot. I Skyped my wife and talked to her and mama and my niece, nephew and neighbours, told them I loved them and missed them and hopefully I'll see them soon.

The hardest part of being here is being away from home and knowing my PS will give me a whole 2 weeks to visit when my contract is finished. I wonder when the last time was that one of my CT's or colleagues spent an entire year away from everyone they know and love?
"The urge to destroy is also a creative urge."
Bakunin

Offline Yu_Bumsuk

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Re: A Disturbing Insight to Laos
« Reply #9 on: October 12, 2011, 09:17:20 AM »
This might sound harsh but I think pinning all the blame on a few heartless, coniving politicians and generals is a bit too easy. It takes appeals to patriotism and fear to stop a public from stopping its government's war machine. I was in the US in the build-up to the invasion of Iraq and I saw how this works first-hand. I blame the much of the Democratic-leaning public just as much as the Republican-leaning part because they were too cowardly to appear 'unpatriotic' and just stand up and say 'this is wrong'. I suspect that much the same was true in the 60s and 70s. And yes, it wasn't just Americans who were / are at fault.



Offline Schellib39

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Re: A Disturbing Insight to Laos
« Reply #10 on: October 12, 2011, 10:34:29 AM »
Mate, have personally been to this part of Laos (plain of jars) and it really is horrible.  It is a terrible thing that happened when it did, but remember that even today hundreds of people are still dying from un-detonated  bombs in the area (especially in farming communities). The Americans dropped large bombs with thousand of smaller bombs, called "bombies", inside.  Many never exploded and were buried in the ground.  Today some people strike them accidentally when farming their fields, people will try to take them apart to get money for the metal and many children find them have no idea what they are and end up dead or without their limbs...

Remember the affects from the 60's and 70's are still impacting that region today.  So instead of just talking about it, there are tons of international agencies there you can do volunteer work with in either educating people about it or helping victims from these bombies.  Just something I think you should look into if it bothers you as much as it sounds...I personally went to some schools in the area where children went who got injured from an un-detonated bombie and I must say it was a really great experience.

Surprised no one has really heard of all of this before.  If you want learn about something even more gruesome, try and read some books on the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia from 1975-1979.  Lots of what happened there (which in my opinion is much worse than what happened in Vietnam or Laos) was also caused, in part, by America's foreign policy in the region at the time.

Some things like both of these events makes me really ashamed of my government at times....

Offline Cereal

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Re: A Disturbing Insight to Laos
« Reply #11 on: October 12, 2011, 11:06:43 AM »
I volunteered my time at the UXO in Laos and took my classes to the UXO center for field trips and spent as much time as I could explaining to the kids what it was all about.

Clearly my heart lies with Laotians as they are my family and adopted country. After 7 years of permanent residency I can, and will, apply for permanent resident status. The Khmer Rouge were brutal animals, it's all tragic, and the saddest part is that the world doesn't really seem to care.

I know people who had limbs blown off due to unexploded ordinance in their rice paddies. Life sucks when planting food can kill you.

How many know about the SE Asian flood of August 2008? I was standing hip deep in water inside my house. The fault was China's; it was during the Olympics and three of their reservoirs were in danger of flooding so they opened the gates and flooded Laos, Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam. The Mekong River looked like an ocean. Two little girls in my village were swept away never to be found. I stared as dead goats and oxen floated by regularly. Countless victims and who mourns for them?

Don't get me started about GW Bush and his WMD's in Iraq, and all of the people who still believe he was telling the truth.

It's group think syndrome. If someone in a position of authority says something often enough - true or not - people tend to sway to his or her opinion.

I don't trust any of them.

I am only one small insignificant man, but I try my best to effect a change regardless of how slight it may be.
"The urge to destroy is also a creative urge."
Bakunin

Offline DWAEDGIMORIGUKBAP

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Re: A Disturbing Insight to Laos
« Reply #12 on: October 12, 2011, 11:23:03 AM »
Quote
How many know about the SE Asian flood of August 2008? I was standing hip deep in water inside my house. The fault was China's; it was during the Olympics and three of their reservoirs were in danger of flooding so they opened the gates and flooded Laos, Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam. The Mekong River looked like an ocean. Two little girls in my village were swept away never to be found. I stared as dead goats and oxen floated by regularly. Countless victims and who mourns for them?


 :(

keep your chin up cereal.  Remember you are only one man and can only be expected to deal with one man's immediate struggles.

Offline prime

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Re: A Disturbing Insight to Laos
« Reply #13 on: October 12, 2011, 02:51:09 PM »
I just watched a short film called "The Most Secret Place On Earth". It's about the US Government's and the CIA's secret bombing of Laos before and during the Vietnam War

I downloaded it from btjunkie. It breaks my heart and makes me want to weep knowing that many of those murdering dogs are still in positions of power. They should be brought up on charges of crimes against humanity

My wife's older brothers and sisters, her mother and aunts and uncles all remember, but they don't talk about it much.

I'm a little angry now and I wish I was home with my wife and family in our little village. Watch it, I think it's important to know. It should make you think about what government's say and do and the belief factor therein.

Nice post, Cereal. F the government. I hope you guys are not talking smack about the government and then turn around and vote.