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Author Topic: Does anyone else have problems baking cookies/muffins/etc. in Korea?  (Read 5113 times)

Offline justanotherwaygook

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Re: Does anyone else have problems baking cookies/muffins/etc. in Korea?
« Reply #20 on: May 14, 2013, 11:48:32 AM »
the three kinds of flour available in korea, all purpose, pastry, and bread, don't come anywhere close to representing the variation.  you can find all sorts of flour 'hacks' on the internet if you poke around.


happy baking

Where can I find all-purpose flour? I only see whole wheat and wheat flour.

Also, is there cake flour in Korea?

I tried GMarket and I can't find all-purpose flour. I looked at my local emart everyday, Homeplus, and a mom and pop shop near my apartment. Does anyone have a picture of all purpose flour?

I have some pancake mix that's used for making pajeon and I'm considering using it as a substitute since it should have all-purpose flour, but that probably won't work, eh?

Hopefully I can find it instead of having to go to the foreign baking market.

Wheat flour is all-purpose flour, generally speaking.  The most prominent stuff on the shelf is AP.  There's usually pictures of noodles and whatnot on the front.

Cake flour has a lower gluten content.  It generally has pictures of cookies on the front.
C is for cookie, that's good enough for me.

Offline Summer

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Re: Does anyone else have problems baking cookies/muffins/etc. in Korea?
« Reply #21 on: May 14, 2013, 12:44:38 PM »
the three kinds of flour available in korea, all purpose, pastry, and bread, don't come anywhere close to representing the variation.  you can find all sorts of flour 'hacks' on the internet if you poke around.


happy baking

Where can I find all-purpose flour? I only see whole wheat and wheat flour.

Also, is there cake flour in Korea?

I tried GMarket and I can't find all-purpose flour. I looked at my local emart everyday, Homeplus, and a mom and pop shop near my apartment. Does anyone have a picture of all purpose flour?

I have some pancake mix that's used for making pajeon and I'm considering using it as a substitute since it should have all-purpose flour, but that probably won't work, eh?

Hopefully I can find it instead of having to go to the foreign baking market.

Wheat flour is all-purpose flour, generally speaking.  The most prominent stuff on the shelf is AP.  There's usually pictures of noodles and whatnot on the front.

Cake flour has a lower gluten content.  It generally has pictures of cookies on the front.

Thank you. I read online that it's not the same but all the info I read is related to baking. I'm using it for deep frying and make waffles/takoyaki.

I don't really care about gluten, so I guess I can substitute wheat flour for cake flour? I guess I'll try. I just have terrible luck with flour products in general so I hope my food doesn't turn into a terrible mess!
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Offline peasgoodnonsuch

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Re: Does anyone else have problems baking cookies/muffins/etc. in Korea?
« Reply #22 on: May 14, 2013, 01:13:04 PM »
All flour comes from wheat unless specified (ex: sweet potato flour, corn flour, almond flour)

Gluten/protein content only matters if you're baking something that needs structure, such as bread. For your purposes, using the flour with the picture of noodles on the front should be fine. Be careful of using jeon flour, as it is usually pre-seasoned with salt and possibly MSG  :sad:

My guess is that the content you read distinguishing wheat flour from all purpose flour really meant "whole wheat flour" when they said wheat flour. Whole wheat flour is of course, less refined and higher in protein and fiber.

I have always been under the impression that the packages of flour here with cookies on the front were actually the ones that were all-purpose and that the noodle ones had less protein and were thus, not that great to use for baking. For cake flour, I suggest buying a wire mesh sieve or sifter and sifting regular flour. It's a good way to fake cake flour ;P

Offline justanotherwaygook

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Re: Does anyone else have problems baking cookies/muffins/etc. in Korea?
« Reply #23 on: May 14, 2013, 01:31:16 PM »
the three kinds of flour available in korea, all purpose, pastry, and bread, don't come anywhere close to representing the variation.  you can find all sorts of flour 'hacks' on the internet if you poke around.


happy baking

Where can I find all-purpose flour? I only see whole wheat and wheat flour.

Also, is there cake flour in Korea?

I tried GMarket and I can't find all-purpose flour. I looked at my local emart everyday, Homeplus, and a mom and pop shop near my apartment. Does anyone have a picture of all purpose flour?

I have some pancake mix that's used for making pajeon and I'm considering using it as a substitute since it should have all-purpose flour, but that probably won't work, eh?

Hopefully I can find it instead of having to go to the foreign baking market.

Wheat flour is all-purpose flour, generally speaking.  The most prominent stuff on the shelf is AP.  There's usually pictures of noodles and whatnot on the front.

Cake flour has a lower gluten content.  It generally has pictures of cookies on the front.

Thank you. I read online that it's not the same but all the info I read is related to baking. I'm using it for deep frying and make waffles/takoyaki.

I don't really care about gluten, so I guess I can substitute wheat flour for cake flour? I guess I'll try. I just have terrible luck with flour products in general so I hope my food doesn't turn into a terrible mess!

You can get cake flour.  Different applications call for different gluten contents.  Cake flour, AP flour and bread flour all have gluten.  It's how much gluten in it that's important.  Cake flour has some, AP is in the middle and bread is the highest.  In fact, you can make AP flour by mixing 50% cake flour and 50% bread flour.

Cake flour will give you very light and delicate items, while bread flour will give you chewy and denser items.

In fact, AP flour is called 중력 (I just remembered this).  It means medium-strength.
C is for cookie, that's good enough for me.

Offline RogueFishFood

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Re: Does anyone else have problems baking cookies/muffins/etc. in Korea?
« Reply #24 on: May 14, 2013, 02:54:24 PM »
Does anyone else have problems baking cookies/muffins/etc. in Korea?

Yes. My problem is I don't have an oven.

Offline morgainenyl

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Re: Does anyone else have problems baking cookies/muffins/etc. in Korea?
« Reply #25 on: May 14, 2013, 04:42:21 PM »
I just tried making my first batch of peanut butter cookies last weekend. They came out alright (maybe not quite enough peanut butter taste, but I think that was because I didn't put enough in, as I just guessed at the measurements because I only have one measuring cup ans it is woefully inadequate... anyway).

I would love to know where I can get my hands on vanilla extract here. I've had some sent from home for the cookies but I'm bound to run out before I get another care package from home, because vanilla is the bomb-diggity for making your cookies taste good. :) Any ideas?

Also, baking powder can be used as a substitute for baking soda, but it doesn't work as well the other way around. If you are using powder and the recipe calls for soda, just add 2-3 times as much powder as the recipe calls for the soda. This makes the powder a bit more versatile in the kitchen. This could be contributing to why your goodies are not rising. Baking soda and powder are not interchangeable.

Offline justanotherwaygook

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C is for cookie, that's good enough for me.

Offline raniel28

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Re: Does anyone else have problems baking cookies/muffins/etc. in Korea?
« Reply #27 on: May 14, 2013, 05:00:20 PM »
I haven't had many problems with baking fortunately. Having said that, I have always struggled with the flattening of my cookies, whether in the US or here. HOWEVER! I was dinking around on the internet and read somewhere that if you split the amount of soda/powder instead of just using one, it helps. I did this with my last batch of chocolate chip cookies (the recipe called for 1tsp of baking soda, so I put 1/2 tsp soda and 1/2 tsp powder) and OMG were they amazing! They didn't flatten or melt (which i also have a problem with sometimes) and they were light and fluffy! I use the regular lighter brown sugar and I was sooooo happy with it!

I also refrigerate my cookie dough for a little bit to stiffen it up, then I'll form it into small disks and freeze them. Then I just take out a few cookie dough disks at a time and bake them that way. Works great for me!

Offline Beyond lies the Wub

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Re: Does anyone else have problems baking cookies/muffins/etc. in Korea?
« Reply #28 on: May 14, 2013, 05:48:29 PM »
Vanilla flavoring is available as a powder here.  It costs 1000 won for a 150g bag.

Baking powder here has a nasty taste, so maybe that's the culprit.  I usually buy it when I am on a trip: Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong all have a British influence, so you can get a lot of 'specialist' ingredients there.

As for flour, I have had varying success, but the flour with pictures of mandu and noodles on the front is no good for baking.  You need pictures of delicious cakes and cookies (as mentioned already).

One more thing, if you use baking powder be sure to add some salt.  The proportions are approximately 1 cup all-purpose flour, 1.5 tsp baking powder and 0.5 tsp salt.

Oh, and there's nothing wrong with MSG.

Offline glb0b

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Re: Does anyone else have problems baking cookies/muffins/etc. in Korea?
« Reply #29 on: May 14, 2013, 06:17:49 PM »

As for flour, I have had varying success, but the flour with pictures of mandu and noodles on the front is no good for baking.  You need pictures of delicious cakes and cookies (as mentioned already).

One more thing, if you use baking powder be sure to add some salt.  The proportions are approximately 1 cup all-purpose flour, 1.5 tsp baking powder and 0.5 tsp salt.


Yes, for baking the one with the cookies on the front is the best. If you are making bread, use the flour with a picture of bread on the front. Avoid the one with a picture of mandu on the front for any kind of baking.

Flour, baking powder and salt as mentioned above is how to turn your all purpose (plain -UK) flour into self-raising flour. Very handy if your recipe requires self-raising flour.

Offline morgainenyl

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Re: Does anyone else have problems baking cookies/muffins/etc. in Korea?
« Reply #30 on: May 14, 2013, 06:24:29 PM »
http://item2.gmarket.co.kr/English/detailview/Item.aspx?goodscode=343343212
Vanilla extract.  Expensive, but there it is.

Oh wow! Thanks, justanotherwaygook!
It is expensive, but at least I can get it in a pinch!

Offline Summer

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Re: Does anyone else have problems baking cookies/muffins/etc. in Korea?
« Reply #31 on: May 14, 2013, 07:45:11 PM »
All flour comes from wheat unless specified (ex: sweet potato flour, corn flour, almond flour)

Gluten/protein content only matters if you're baking something that needs structure, such as bread. For your purposes, using the flour with the picture of noodles on the front should be fine. Be careful of using jeon flour, as it is usually pre-seasoned with salt and possibly MSG  :sad:

My guess is that the content you read distinguishing wheat flour from all purpose flour really meant "whole wheat flour" when they said wheat flour. Whole wheat flour is of course, less refined and higher in protein and fiber.

I have always been under the impression that the packages of flour here with cookies on the front were actually the ones that were all-purpose and that the noodle ones had less protein and were thus, not that great to use for baking. For cake flour, I suggest buying a wire mesh sieve or sifter and sifting regular flour. It's a good way to fake cake flour ;P

There are two types of flour I see in my local mart; whole wheat flour and wheat flour. So AP flour = wheat flour?
Sorry for the stupid questions, I am a decent cook but a terrible baker! Even though I'm not using the flour for baking, I don't know much about baking related ingredients.

You can get cake flour.  Different applications call for different gluten contents.  Cake flour, AP flour and bread flour all have gluten.  It's how much gluten in it that's important.  Cake flour has some, AP is in the middle and bread is the highest.  In fact, you can make AP flour by mixing 50% cake flour and 50% bread flour.

Cake flour will give you very light and delicate items, while bread flour will give you chewy and denser items.

In fact, AP flour is called 중력 (I just remembered this).  It means medium-strength.

Thank you so much for finding/knowing the Korean for it! I found some on GMarket. But I don't really like buying food online so I MIGHT try wheat flour first...
Also, I see wheat flour that says it can be used for 케잌/과자/튀김용 (cake, confectioneries, frying).

I have this flour:
http://www.cj.co.kr/upload/product/106296_%EB%B6%80%EC%B9%A8%EA%B0%80%EB%A3%A8ss.jpg
바삭한 부침가루

Google translate says it's "Ups and downs crispy flour"  :huh: Anyone know the correct translation? My boyfriend (Korean) says it's pancake mix but I tried mixing just this with water and the 파전 I made didn't taste that great and it didn't look right. So I think it may be just some sort of flour?
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Offline justanotherwaygook

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Re: Does anyone else have problems baking cookies/muffins/etc. in Korea?
« Reply #32 on: May 14, 2013, 08:17:19 PM »
Flour comes from wheat.  You're just not used to seeing it on your home country's packaging.  The English on Korean packaging, as we know, is sometimes a bit odd.  The Korean word for flour (wheat flour) is 밀가루, literally "wheat powder."  That's probably why they label it the way they do.

Basically, all flour is derived from wheat unless another grain is specified (like rye flour, as peas mentioned).  Cake flour, pastry flour (which I forgot has a slightly different gluten content from cake flour but they're quite close), AP flour and bread flour are all wheat flours.

If you need AP flour, get the stuff with noodles on the package.  It's called "중력"-medium strength

If you need pastry/cake flour, get the the stuff with cookies on the package. It's called "박력"-low-strength, more commonly labeled as "과자용"-for making snacks,

If you need bread flour, get the stuff with bread on the package.  It's called "강력"-high strength.

바삭한 부침가루 means "crispy pancake powder".  It is indeed for 전. 
C is for cookie, that's good enough for me.

Offline sheikhnguyen

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Re: Does anyone else have problems baking cookies/muffins/etc. in Korea?
« Reply #33 on: May 14, 2013, 08:34:11 PM »
Most flour sold here has a very high protein content usually 15%, in the west that is what is used for bread. However for sweeter products like cakes, and pastry 7-9% is the norm. If you look for it you can find "pastry flour" which has a lower protein content.
That said the 15% flour which you see in the supermarkets is excellent for bread and especially bagels.
So look at the nutrition information on the back is the 단백질 is less than 10% per 100g you are good to go for sweets.
Also as other have said humidity plays a role in bread making.
Anyway good luck!
Nullius in Verba

Offline justanotherwaygook

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Re: Does anyone else have problems baking cookies/muffins/etc. in Korea?
« Reply #34 on: May 14, 2013, 08:53:27 PM »
Most flour sold here has a very high protein content usually 15%, in the west that is what is used for bread. However for sweeter products like cakes, and pastry 7-9% is the norm. If you look for it you can find "pastry flour" which has a lower protein content.
That said the 15% flour which you see in the supermarkets is excellent for bread and especially bagels.
So look at the nutrition information on the back is the 단백질 is less than 10% per 100g you are good to go for sweets.
Also as other have said humidity plays a role in bread making.
Anyway good luck!

My bag of Homeplus 중력밀가루 has 10.3g of 단백질/100 g.

http://blog.hansune.com/75 This seems to indicate that the amounts are similar to what we have back in the West (at least the US).
강력-over 13%
중력-10-13%
박력-under 10%
C is for cookie, that's good enough for me.

Offline Summer

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Re: Does anyone else have problems baking cookies/muffins/etc. in Korea?
« Reply #35 on: May 14, 2013, 09:01:49 PM »
Flour comes from wheat.  You're just not used to seeing it on your home country's packaging.  The English on Korean packaging, as we know, is sometimes a bit odd.  The Korean word for flour (wheat flour) is 밀가루, literally "wheat powder."  That's probably why they label it the way they do.

Basically, all flour is derived from wheat unless another grain is specified (like rye flour, as peas mentioned).  Cake flour, pastry flour (which I forgot has a slightly different gluten content from cake flour but they're quite close), AP flour and bread flour are all wheat flours.

If you need AP flour, get the stuff with noodles on the package.  It's called "중력"-medium strength

If you need pastry/cake flour, get the the stuff with cookies on the package. It's called "박력"-low-strength, more commonly labeled as "과자용"-for making snacks,

If you need bread flour, get the stuff with bread on the package.  It's called "강력"-high strength.

바삭한 부침가루 means "crispy pancake powder".  It is indeed for 전.

Thank you so much for the explanation  ;D

I guess I'm just terrible at making 전  :cry:
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Offline peasgoodnonsuch

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Re: Does anyone else have problems baking cookies/muffins/etc. in Korea?
« Reply #36 on: May 15, 2013, 01:12:37 PM »
Haha. Well, I learned something too! I only ever looked the pictures, so I just assumed the one with cookies on the front was AP flour. That would also explain why the few baking projects I've done have not turned out the way I wanted. I think it's really weird that they have cookies on a package of cake flour though. So confusing! :undecided:

For Vanilla Extract, you might be able to get it in a foreign goods store, like I Love Cookie. There's also a specialty baking store near Express Bus Terminal...




PS. MSG is bad for you if you're allergic to it. I don't know about you, but I don't really enjoy getting a headache and red face with my meal ㄱ_ㄱ;; Plus this...http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23620336 and this http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23216967

Offline Beyond lies the Wub

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Re: Does anyone else have problems baking cookies/muffins/etc. in Korea?
« Reply #37 on: May 15, 2013, 01:27:40 PM »
Haha. Well, I learned something too! I only ever looked the pictures, so I just assumed the one with cookies on the front was AP flour. That would also explain why the few baking projects I've done have not turned out the way I wanted. I think it's really weird that they have cookies on a package of cake flour though. So confusing! :undecided:
For Vanilla Extract, you might be able to get it in a foreign goods store, like I Love Cookie. There's also a specialty baking store near Express Bus Terminal...
PS. MSG is bad for you if you're allergic to it. I don't know about you, but I don't really enjoy getting a headache and red face with my meal ㄱ_ㄱ;; Plus this...http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23620336 and this http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23216967

Do you have any research into its effects on humans?

Also, this:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2009/aug/12/msg-allergy-chinese-restaurant-syndrome-myth

Offline justanotherwaygook

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Re: Does anyone else have problems baking cookies/muffins/etc. in Korea?
« Reply #38 on: May 15, 2013, 02:52:12 PM »
Haha. Well, I learned something too! I only ever looked the pictures, so I just assumed the one with cookies on the front was AP flour. That would also explain why the few baking projects I've done have not turned out the way I wanted. I think it's really weird that they have cookies on a package of cake flour though. So confusing! :undecided:
Well, it's not quite cake flour, TBH.  I think it's more like pastry flour which has a slightly higher gluten content than cake flour.  I don't think true cake flour is readily available.
C is for cookie, that's good enough for me.

Offline dahteil

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Re: Does anyone else have problems baking cookies/muffins/etc. in Korea?
« Reply #39 on: May 15, 2013, 04:00:03 PM »
don't forget to buy some baking powder! Homeplus sells it under the Tesco label. It was on the same aisle as the flour the last time I was there.

 

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