March 27, 2019, 12:11:52 AM


Author Topic: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.  (Read 3059 times)

Offline sbk

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #60 on: February 12, 2019, 05:38:24 PM »
to be fair idk what i'd say in that situation if i had to professionally convey that information. "manually" ??
I gotcha, fam

I am not confused by it now. For a brief moment i had to think about the word but i am fine now.

Online Enzo

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #61 on: February 12, 2019, 05:40:39 PM »
PENG... it sounds stupid

Online Savant

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #62 on: February 12, 2019, 09:32:51 PM »
I don't know if it's very modern or not but fanboys/girls saying, "I'm so proud of my girls/boys" when referring to something their favorite music group did. You're not their f@cking manager.

Online Cyanea

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #63 on: February 12, 2019, 10:19:37 PM »

Quote
Tossed around like a rag doll


The most overused imagery in the English language this millenium.


Just say 'tossed around like a cork. A leaf. A feather in the wind. A piece of flotsam. A speck of dust. a piece of paper.

Anything! except "like a rag doll" again.
Catch my drift?

Offline JNM

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #64 on: February 13, 2019, 07:46:00 AM »
“Yup” as a response to “Thank you.”

Offline JVPrice

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #65 on: February 13, 2019, 07:47:09 AM »
or perhaps viol doigt for French.
I mean, you can't just have "fingered" on a report...

Tes doigts finit où mes droits commence.

lol this deeply upsets me. but idk dude would you say "fingered" on a news program?

Would you like some sausage?

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Offline #basedcowboyshirt

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #66 on: February 13, 2019, 07:54:17 AM »
“Yup” as a response to “Thank you.”

Yeah. That's just rude.

Offline lashrl

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #67 on: February 13, 2019, 12:08:41 PM »
"Adulting" being used by twenty odd year olds when they do anything. Ever.

"Random" being used as a personality trait. "I'm just so random"  :blank:

Also I feel like we ALL knew that PC meant Politically Correct in the context in which it was stated. It's been widely used for at least a couple of decades now and is definitely as common as Personal Computer.

You're either being deliberately obtuse to make a point or you genuinely didn't know. Either way it's absolutely no one else's fault you didn't have that (VERY) common knowledge. Just because YOU haven't heard of it doesn't mean it's not a widely used acronym.

But like, he wasn't talking about anything even related to politics or political correctness. He just said 'PC terms' without anything else indicating what he meant. Nothing else in his post was related to political correctness or anything, either. That's a pretty huge leap to expect people to infer that an acronym with a widely established meaning when used without any other indicators means something other than what it usually means.

Like, when we see PC방, we know that there are computers in them, so we know what PC stands for. Or if people are talking about Mac vs. PC, we know, because they're both computers. Because everyone knows that PC usually means 'computer.' And also context. If anybody uses the term PC to mean 'politically correct,' it's probably in the context of talking about political correctness, or something. Like, there needs to be some hint that you're using an alternate meaning for PC.

dexteriously?

Offline kangsheng

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #68 on: February 13, 2019, 04:07:38 PM »
Crazy as an attributive adjective: "I've been crazy busy."
Dot your i's and cross your t's
Teaching referred to as a dog and pony show
Building on 'Yup'--"No worries" for "You're welcome"

Offline JNM

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #69 on: February 13, 2019, 05:53:05 PM »
Crazy as an attributive adjective: "I've been crazy busy."
Dot your i's and cross your t's
Teaching referred to as a dog and pony show
Building on 'Yup'--"No worries" for "You're welcome"
“No worries” doesn’t bother me as much. I hear is as the Spanish “de nadda”, or French “de rien”.
« Last Edit: February 13, 2019, 08:06:50 PM by JNM »

Offline CO2

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The joys of fauxtherhood

Online eggieguffer

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #71 on: February 13, 2019, 06:23:30 PM »
People saying something someone says is 'interesting' when they actually mean it's something they violently disagree with.

Offline oglop

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #72 on: February 13, 2019, 07:12:08 PM »
People saying something someone says is 'interesting' when they actually mean it's something they violently disagree with.
haha. i did a lesson on "diplomatic language" this week and i ended it with this


Offline kyndo

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #73 on: February 13, 2019, 07:19:46 PM »
People saying something someone says is 'interesting' when they actually mean it's something they violently disagree with.
Interesting.

Actually, I use this a lot when talking with Korean teachers about political stuff. It's a great way to feel like one has made one's objection without causing waves in the workplace without straining professional relationships.

    Using it with people who know what it's code for is a bit of a cop-out though, I agree. Why bother when everybody understands?

   Has anybody mentioned "I could care less" and "irregardless" yet? I seem to recall that some threads here on Waygook concerning those 2 got pretty heated.
How about the subjunctive mood? Anybody up for a good shouting match about whether or not it should exist?  :smiley:

Offline tylerthegloob

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #74 on: February 14, 2019, 07:30:31 AM »

How about the subjunctive mood? Anybody up for a good shouting match about whether or not it should exist?  :smiley:

to be honest, i could care less

Offline CO2

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #75 on: February 14, 2019, 07:48:24 AM »
   Has anybody mentioned "I could care less" and "irregardless" yet?

I hate irregardless. People do argue that it's a word, and that's fine.

Quote
Most dictionaries list it as non-standard or incorrect usage, and recommend that "regardless" should be used instead.

- Agnes, Michael, ed. Webster's New World College Dictionary. 4th Ed. Cleveland, Ohio: Wiley Publishing, 2004.

You wanna argue it's a word, fine. That does not mean that it should be used. "I'm un-irresponsible!" Like, what? Why are you wording it like that? It can be fun to wink and say "I don't NOT know what you're talking about." but that's simply for effect. Irregardless is truly stupid.
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Offline Chinguetti

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #76 on: February 14, 2019, 08:06:04 AM »
Bae.
Tea (meaning "gossip" -- just ****** call it gossip)
Shook
Basically any slang made popular on the internet being said irl.
"Is that clear?"

Offline JenniferNZ1

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #77 on: February 14, 2019, 08:18:20 AM »
Thanks oglop
I really enjoyed the chart on what the British say and what they mean.  I know I have used them myself (from British background) and enjoyed a bit of a chuckle at the desk.  Just what I needed today.

Offline CO2

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #78 on: February 14, 2019, 08:24:51 AM »
Shook
There ain't no such thing as half-way crooks
they scared to death, they scared to look
The joys of fauxtherhood

Offline alexisalex

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #79 on: February 14, 2019, 08:54:55 AM »
"The feels"/"All the feels"

Has anyone noticed how much their own speaking style and writing style has changed since living here?  Sometimes I think that if my friends and family back home could hear how I speak and read my texts they'd say "alexisalex, why are you speaking so weirdly?"  :laugh: