February 22, 2019, 12:02:53 PM


Author Topic: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.  (Read 2017 times)

Offline debbiem89

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #40 on: February 12, 2019, 01:13:48 PM »
"Adulting" being used by twenty odd year olds when they do anything. Ever.

"Random" being used as a personality trait. "I'm just so random"  :blank:

Also I feel like we ALL knew that PC meant Politically Correct in the context in which it was stated. It's been widely used for at least a couple of decades now and is definitely as common as Personal Computer.

You're either being deliberately obtuse to make a point or you genuinely didn't know. Either way it's absolutely no one else's fault you didn't have that (VERY) common knowledge. Just because YOU haven't heard of it doesn't mean it's not a widely used acronym.

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #41 on: February 12, 2019, 01:20:04 PM »
"Adulting" being used by twenty odd year olds when they do anything. Ever.

Hey, guys, I, a 27 year old uni graduate, paid a bill! Look! #adulting

Quote
just because YOU haven't heard of it doesn't mean it's not a widely used acronym.

AFAIK IANAL but YMMV, PTFO
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Offline sbk

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #42 on: February 12, 2019, 01:27:05 PM »
Referring to the use of a person's fingers as Digital or Digitally. The first time i heard it was a news story where they mentioned the phrase "digitally raped." I was thinking it must have been some time of cyber crime.

Online tylerthegloob

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #43 on: February 12, 2019, 01:32:08 PM »
Referring to the use of a person's fingers as Digital or Digitally. The first time i heard it was a news story where they mentioned the phrase "digitally raped." I was thinking it must have been some time of cyber crime.

to be fair idk what i'd say in that situation if i had to professionally convey that information. "manually" ??

Offline #basedcowboyshirt

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #44 on: February 12, 2019, 01:32:45 PM »
"Adulting" being used by twenty odd year olds when they do anything. Ever.

"Random" being used as a personality trait. "I'm just so random"  :blank:

Also I feel like we ALL knew that PC meant Politically Correct in the context in which it was stated. It's been widely used for at least a couple of decades now and is definitely as common as Personal Computer.

You're either being deliberately obtuse to make a point or you genuinely didn't know. Either way it's absolutely no one else's fault you didn't have that (VERY) common knowledge. Just because YOU haven't heard of it doesn't mean it's not a widely used acronym.

But like, he wasn't talking about anything even related to politics or political correctness. He just said 'PC terms' without anything else indicating what he meant. Nothing else in his post was related to political correctness or anything, either. That's a pretty huge leap to expect people to infer that an acronym with a widely established meaning when used without any other indicators means something other than what it usually means.

Like, when we see PC방, we know that there are computers in them, so we know what PC stands for. Or if people are talking about Mac vs. PC, we know, because they're both computers. Because everyone knows that PC usually means 'computer.' And also context. If anybody uses the term PC to mean 'politically correct,' it's probably in the context of talking about political correctness, or something. Like, there needs to be some hint that you're using an alternate meaning for PC.

Offline #basedcowboyshirt

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #45 on: February 12, 2019, 01:35:05 PM »
Referring to the use of a person's fingers as Digital or Digitally.

Wait. Are you literally confused by this? Fingers are called digits. This is literally a centuries-old usage.

dig·i·tal
Dictionary result for digital
/ˈdijidl/
adjective
adjective: digital

    1.
    (of signals or data) expressed as series of the digits 0 and 1, typically represented by values of a physical quantity such as voltage or magnetic polarization.
        relating to, using, or storing data or information in the form of digital signals.
        "digital TV"
        involving or relating to the use of computer technology.
        "the digital revolution"
    2.
    (of a clock or watch) showing the time by means of displayed digits rather than hands or a pointer.
    3.
    relating to a finger or fingers.

Origin
late 15th century: from Latin digitalis, from digitus ‘finger, toe’.

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #46 on: February 12, 2019, 01:36:13 PM »
to be fair idk what i'd say in that situation if i had to professionally convey that information. "manually" ??
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Online tylerthegloob

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #47 on: February 12, 2019, 01:38:37 PM »
to be fair idk what i'd say in that situation if i had to professionally convey that information. "manually" ??
I gotcha, fam

lol this deeply upsets me. but idk dude would you say "fingered" on a news program?

Online Mr.DeMartino

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #48 on: February 12, 2019, 01:39:50 PM »
Referring to the use of a person's fingers as Digital or Digitally. The first time i heard it was a news story where they mentioned the phrase "digitally raped." I was thinking it must have been some time of cyber crime.
Well that is the technical term...

I suppose you could say dactyus hyrapus for Greek or raptus digitus for Latin or perhaps viol doigt for French. I don't know much Ancient Greek or Latin or French so maybe someone else could clarify and come up with a more appropriate term.

I mean, you can't just have "fingered" on a report...

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #49 on: February 12, 2019, 01:43:45 PM »
or perhaps viol doigt for French.
I mean, you can't just have "fingered" on a report...

Tes doigts finit où mes droits commence.

lol this deeply upsets me. but idk dude would you say "fingered" on a news program?

Would you like some sausage?
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Online confusedsafferinkorea

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #50 on: February 12, 2019, 01:44:09 PM »
Friends, Romans and countrymen................. this was meant to be a light-hearted thread and people are getting all bent out of shape on technicalities. 

Just chill, tell us the words that irritate you and never mind the people that come here to pick a fight/argument/derail the thread.

To those looking for a fight/argument etc, it doesn't matter what you think about other people's irritations, it is theirs not yours, so leave them be. Geez people.
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Online Mister Tim

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #51 on: February 12, 2019, 01:48:44 PM »

Like, when we see PC방, we know that there are computers in them, so we know what PC stands for. Or if people are talking about Mac vs. PC, we know, because they're both computers. Because everyone knows that PC usually means 'computer.' And also context. If anybody uses the term PC to mean 'politically correct,' it's probably in the context of talking about political correctness, or something. Like, there needs to be some hint that you're using an alternate meaning for PC.

There was context given, though: The topic of the thread itself.

Given the socio-political state of things these days- especially on the internet - I thought it was pretty obvious what he meant by it. What have you heard people griping about more: computer terminology, or politically correct language? (I honestly had to consciously stop myself from typing "PC language" there, haha.)

Offline #basedcowboyshirt

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #52 on: February 12, 2019, 01:49:35 PM »
'Addicting'. This is the dumbest word.

Online Mister Tim

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #53 on: February 12, 2019, 01:51:00 PM »
It's like confusing "regret" with "apology" in diplomatic language. They are two very distinct things with different legal ramifications, but some of the members are either unwilling to make that distinction because of whatever reason or unable to because of personality, likely impatience and inability to perceive detail, or (lack of) mental development.


It isn't quite like that, if you're referring to what I think you are, haha.

Online Mr.DeMartino

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #54 on: February 12, 2019, 01:52:55 PM »
Given the socio-political state of things these days- especially on the internet - I thought it was pretty obvious what he meant by it. What have you heard people griping about more: computer terminology, or politically correct language? (I honestly had to consciously stop myself from typing "PC language" there, haha.)
What about the cops? Or maybe someone's looking for their PC+2 Burn data...

Online Mr.DeMartino

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #55 on: February 12, 2019, 01:54:20 PM »
It's like confusing "regret" with "apology" in diplomatic language. They are two very distinct things with different legal ramifications, but some of the members are either unwilling to make that distinction because of whatever reason or unable to because of personality, likely impatience and inability to perceive detail, or (lack of) mental development.


It isn't quite like that, if you're referring to what I think you are, haha.
There is a distinct difference
https://www.sfgate.com/opinion/openforum/article/Regret-vs-Apology-Why-Being-Sorry-It-Happened-2933780.php

Online Mister Tim

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #56 on: February 12, 2019, 01:58:09 PM »
It's like confusing "regret" with "apology" in diplomatic language. They are two very distinct things with different legal ramifications, but some of the members are either unwilling to make that distinction because of whatever reason or unable to because of personality, likely impatience and inability to perceive detail, or (lack of) mental development.


It isn't quite like that, if you're referring to what I think you are, haha.
There is a distinct difference
https://www.sfgate.com/opinion/openforum/article/Regret-vs-Apology-Why-Being-Sorry-It-Happened-2933780.php

Yes, I understand that there's a difference in English. I thought you were bringing up the Japan/Dokdo thing again, though, which isn't the same sort of issue as is being discussed here. Apologies if you were referring to a US/China thing.  :smiley:

Online alexisalex

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #57 on: February 12, 2019, 02:38:18 PM »
"Adulting" being used by twenty odd year olds when they do anything. Ever.

"Random" being used as a personality trait. "I'm just so random"  :blank:

Also I feel like we ALL knew that PC meant Politically Correct in the context in which it was stated. It's been widely used for at least a couple of decades now and is definitely as common as Personal Computer.

You're either being deliberately obtuse to make a point or you genuinely didn't know. Either way it's absolutely no one else's fault you didn't have that (VERY) common knowledge. Just because YOU haven't heard of it doesn't mean it's not a widely used acronym.

But like, he wasn't talking about anything even related to politics or political correctness. He just said 'PC terms' without anything else indicating what he meant. Nothing else in his post was related to political correctness or anything, either. That's a pretty huge leap to expect people to infer that an acronym with a widely established meaning when used without any other indicators means something other than what it usually means.

Like, when we see PC방, we know that there are computers in them, so we know what PC stands for. Or if people are talking about Mac vs. PC, we know, because they're both computers. Because everyone knows that PC usually means 'computer.' And also context. If anybody uses the term PC to mean 'politically correct,' it's probably in the context of talking about political correctness, or something. Like, there needs to be some hint that you're using an alternate meaning for PC.

"Like".  People overusing it when talking is really grating.

So I'm bemused why you're typing it.

Also everyone knew PC meant politically correct  :laugh:

Online confusedsafferinkorea

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #58 on: February 12, 2019, 02:48:05 PM »
As a gesture of goodwill to HRH Mr DM, let me revise my original statement. I find the use of the words 'person of interest' in whatever context it is used, irritating.
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Online bigdan4713

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #59 on: February 12, 2019, 03:31:32 PM »
1.  Woke (It is less pretentious-sounding, but somehow even more pretentious than would be the more grammatically correct "awakened".)
2.  Dumpster Fire (An amusing image at first, it has quickly become trite.)
3.  Surreal (While certainly not modern, its recent tendency to describe situations which are nowhere close to actually being surreal has severely lessened the impact of what was formerly a supremely "cool" word.)