February 22, 2019, 01:00:43 PM


Author Topic: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.  (Read 2021 times)

Online confusedsafferinkorea

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This is just a fun posting. Some words/sayings I hear these days really irritate me. Which ones irritate you?

Here are mine:

Daily driver:  referring to the phone someone uses daily.

Deplane: used to tell you to get your ass of the airplane.

Person of interest:  used to indicate they are a suspect in a crime.

and most PC (politically correct) terms.
« Last Edit: February 12, 2019, 10:14:01 AM by confusedsafferinkorea »
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Online tylerthegloob

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2019, 08:20:59 AM »
This is just a fun posting. Some words/sayings I hear these days really irritate me. Which ones irritate you?

Here are mine:

Daily driver:  referring to the phone someone uses daily.

Deplane: used to tell you to get your ass of the airplane.

Person of interest:  used to indicate they are a suspect in a crime.

and most PC terms.

wow i've never heard daily driver. where is that used?

Online eggieguffer

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2019, 08:26:02 AM »
This is just a fun posting. Some words/sayings I hear these days really irritate me. Which ones irritate you?

Here are mine:

Daily driver:  referring to the phone someone uses daily.

Deplane: used to tell you to get your ass of the airplane.

Person of interest:  used to indicate they are a suspect in a crime.

and most PC terms.

'reinventing the wheel'
'going forwards'
talking about 'spaces'
People saying they're very 'excited' to be starting a leadership role.
'feedback' when it means 'complaints'. 

Offline #basedcowboyshirt

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2019, 08:28:41 AM »

Daily driver:  referring to the phone someone uses daily.


Um... it's not just for your phone. It's for anything that's your go-to daily use thing.

It comes from the practice of having a luxury, fancy car that you only take out on special occasions, or when the weather is nice, and then a reliable car like a Honda or whatever that you have for everyday use.

The term has since been applied to things like laptops, tablets, bags, etc.

Also, since when does 'person of interest' = suspect? A person of interest is just someone who may or may not be related to a crime. A person of interest may also be a suspect, but he or she may also just be someone who investigators believe may be related to the case in some way.

Offline #basedcowboyshirt

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2019, 08:33:44 AM »
This is just a fun posting. Some words/sayings I hear these days really irritate me. Which ones irritate you?

...

and most PC terms.

Haha what? Things like RAM, motherboard, or monitor bother you? That seems... like something you wouldn't necessarily need to complain about.

Online alexisalex

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2019, 08:40:12 AM »
"Gift" as a verb.  Don't know why it annoys me so much.

"Adulting". 

Online CO2

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #6 on: February 12, 2019, 08:41:34 AM »
Shit is lit.

Stop.
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Online Mr.DeMartino

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #7 on: February 12, 2019, 08:54:18 AM »
Daily Driver...isn't that a car you use for regular commuting as opposed to your convertible or utility pick up truck?

Online JVPrice

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #8 on: February 12, 2019, 08:56:15 AM »
Swag , though this word has become less popular

Fortnite , because ya know

The F word , I hated profanity before but I hate it even more now that I'm in Korea

"You'll understand some day." is my biggest pet peeve.
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Offline denimdaze

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #9 on: February 12, 2019, 09:03:00 AM »
Mine include saying that something is ~(adj) as F*ck.  I'm even seeing it in headlines, but it's shortened to AF.

"My bad" for my mistake.  Mistake is a noun  Bad is an adjective.

It is what it is - used to say something can't be changed.


Online Mr.DeMartino

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #10 on: February 12, 2019, 09:09:57 AM »
Person of interest:  used to indicate they are a suspect in a crime.
Uhhhh...that's actually a really important distinction and has profound legal implications. A "suspect" is someone who the police believe is responsible for the crime. As a suspect, they cannot be questioned without having their rights read, and if they request an attorney, one must be provided. Furthermore, they can refuse to answer questions. Usually a warrant for their arrest has been issued and if the police believe they are dealing with a suspect, they can and will arrest them on the spot.

A 'Person of Interest' is someone who may or may not be a suspect and is of material interest to the police. Perhaps as a potential suspect, but also perhaps as a witness or accessory (witting or unwitting) or is of some other connection to the case. As such they have different legal protections and they quite likely DO NOT have a warrant for their arrest issued.

This is a really important distinction and it also has relevance in terms of reporting by the news. Calling someone a suspect who isn't could result in a lawsuit.

Just because you are too impatient to learn and understand the nuance concerning something, doesn't make it stupid.

Online confusedsafferinkorea

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #11 on: February 12, 2019, 09:20:21 AM »
This is just a fun posting. Some words/sayings I hear these days really irritate me. Which ones irritate you?

Here are mine:

Daily driver:  referring to the phone someone uses daily.

Deplane: used to tell you to get your ass of the airplane.

Person of interest:  used to indicate they are a suspect in a crime.

and most PC terms.

wow i've never heard daily driver. where is that used?

Often used on YouTube when they review a phone and they use it as their every day phone then they say, It's my daily driver'.
Everything is not as it seems.

No one owes you anything.... get over it.

NEVER think a failure is the end of the world, it is the beginning of a new opportunity.

There is no known medical cure for stupidity!

Online confusedsafferinkorea

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #12 on: February 12, 2019, 09:24:21 AM »
Person of interest:  used to indicate they are a suspect in a crime.
Uhhhh...that's actually a really important distinction and has profound legal implications. A "suspect" is someone who the police believe is responsible for the crime. As a suspect, they cannot be questioned without having their rights read, and if they request an attorney, one must be provided. Furthermore, they can refuse to answer questions. Usually a warrant for their arrest has been issued and if the police believe they are dealing with a suspect, they can and will arrest them on the spot.

A 'Person of Interest' is someone who may or may not be a suspect and is of material interest to the police. Perhaps as a potential suspect, but also perhaps as a witness or accessory (witting or unwitting) or is of some other connection to the case. As such they have different legal protections and they quite likely DO NOT have a warrant for their arrest issued.

This is a really important distinction and it also has relevance in terms of reporting by the news. Calling someone a suspect who isn't could result in a lawsuit.

Just because you are too impatient to learn and understand the nuance concerning something, doesn't make it stupid.

Wow DM, who rained on your parade this morning?  I never said it was stupid, I said it irritates me. This is not a serious thread and there is no need to be rude. If you can't join in the spirit of the topic, leave the room. Simple.
Everything is not as it seems.

No one owes you anything.... get over it.

NEVER think a failure is the end of the world, it is the beginning of a new opportunity.

There is no known medical cure for stupidity!

Online confusedsafferinkorea

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #13 on: February 12, 2019, 09:27:16 AM »
This is just a fun posting. Some words/sayings I hear these days really irritate me. Which ones irritate you?

...

and most PC terms.

Haha what? Things like RAM, motherboard, or monitor bother you? That seems... like something you wouldn't necessarily need to complain about.

PC = politically correct, not computer components.    :laugh:
Everything is not as it seems.

No one owes you anything.... get over it.

NEVER think a failure is the end of the world, it is the beginning of a new opportunity.

There is no known medical cure for stupidity!

Online CO2

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #14 on: February 12, 2019, 09:30:39 AM »
Haha what? Things like RAM, motherboard, or monitor bother you? That seems... like something you wouldn't necessarily need to complain about.

PC = politically correct, not computer components.    :laugh:

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Donglegate
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Online tylerthegloob

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #15 on: February 12, 2019, 09:32:49 AM »
i really dislike the the word snowflake and i think it's used way too much

Online Mr.DeMartino

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #16 on: February 12, 2019, 09:39:15 AM »
Wow DM, who rained on your parade this morning?  I never said it was stupid, I said it irritates me. This is not a serious thread and there is no need to be rude. If you can't join in the spirit of the topic, leave the room. Simple.
It shouldn't irritate you. If it irritates you, you have a problem. It is a really important and critical distinction. It's like saying "When people use microwave oven to describe a stove." A microwave isn't a stove, it's a microwave. It's called something different because IT IS something different. Sorry, but if you say something that ridiculous, you deserve the flaming that is coming your way.

Your point wasn't lighthearted or funny. This is actually something that happens in comedy- when someone tries to make a joke about something, but it's actually something real and serious, it isn't funny. And the person needs to get called out for their ridiculous point.

Like anyone who knows the actual difference between the terms isn't bothered by it because they understand why it's important. The only person who would be bothered is someone who is unlearned enough to not comprehend the difference.

Offline kyndo

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #17 on: February 12, 2019, 09:39:54 AM »
I just wanna say that this thread is a virtual treasure trove of words and phrases that I can use in any future arguments.
Carry on.  :angel:

Online alexisalex

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #18 on: February 12, 2019, 09:45:10 AM »
Wow DM, who rained on your parade this morning?  I never said it was stupid, I said it irritates me. This is not a serious thread and there is no need to be rude. If you can't join in the spirit of the topic, leave the room. Simple.
It shouldn't irritate you. If it irritates you, you have a problem. It is a really important and critical distinction. It's like saying "When people use microwave oven to describe a stove." A microwave isn't a stove, it's a microwave. It's called something different because IT IS something different. Sorry, but if you say something that ridiculous, you deserve the flaming that is coming your way.

Your point wasn't lighthearted or funny. This is actually something that happens in comedy- when someone tries to make a joke about something, but it's actually something real and serious, it isn't funny. And the person needs to get called out for their ridiculous point.

Like anyone who knows the actual difference between the terms isn't bothered by it because they understand why it's important. The only person who would be bothered is someone who is unlearned enough to not comprehend the difference.

Yeah don't you hate it when people describe stoves as microwave ovens.  It drives me up the wall.

Online confusedsafferinkorea

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Re: Which modern or relatively modern English words/sayings irritate you.
« Reply #19 on: February 12, 2019, 09:48:12 AM »
Wow DM, who rained on your parade this morning?  I never said it was stupid, I said it irritates me. This is not a serious thread and there is no need to be rude. If you can't join in the spirit of the topic, leave the room. Simple.
It shouldn't irritate you. If it irritates you, you have a problem. It is a really important and critical distinction. It's like saying "When people use microwave oven to describe a stove." A microwave isn't a stove, it's a microwave. It's called something different because IT IS something different. Sorry, but if you say something that ridiculous, you deserve the flaming that is coming your way.

Your point wasn't lighthearted or funny. This is actually something that happens in comedy- when someone tries to make a joke about something, but it's actually something real and serious, it isn't funny. And the person needs to get called out for their ridiculous point.

Like anyone who knows the actual difference between the terms isn't bothered by it because they understand why it's important. The only person who would be bothered is someone who is unlearned enough to not comprehend the difference.

DM, you are just looking for an argument as usual. I am not going to take the bait. As I said if you don't like the thread, go away. Is it necessary to scour the website just to pick a fight with someone? You seem to do this on a daily basis. 

I am perfectly entitled to feel irritated about anything I like and you have no right to say what I can feel irritated about or not. At the moment you are irritating me. Just join the spirit of the thread or go away and stop being obnoxious.
Everything is not as it seems.

No one owes you anything.... get over it.

NEVER think a failure is the end of the world, it is the beginning of a new opportunity.

There is no known medical cure for stupidity!