February 17, 2019, 04:40:08 PM


Author Topic: Life after teaching in Korea  (Read 2020 times)

Offline Kayos

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Re: Life after teaching in Korea
« Reply #20 on: February 12, 2019, 09:45:34 AM »
I'm planning to do 1 more contract at the end of my current contract. After that, maybe do a year or 2 in Japan, then I plan to go back to university and study Japanese (unless I get can it to a high level before that point). Once I'm done teaching, I'm thinking about working as a translator. Haven't really looked into work opportunities about it but, I think it could be enjoyable. :D

If the work opportunities aren't good. I plan to go back to my home country, and maybe become a high school Japanese, or computing, teacher. :p

Or think of something else. I have a lot of things I'm interested in job wise, but it's difficult trying to decide which I'd like to pursue more.

Online SanderB

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Re: Life after teaching in Korea
« Reply #21 on: February 12, 2019, 11:44:51 AM »
What country?  Need EU passport, correct?  Sounds too good to be true.  5600 Euro.. then 50% taxes..  so 2300 EURO?

Holland- But the shortages are widespread all over the EU  -UK, BELGIUM, GERMANY, SWEDEN etc- max would be 3530 at 35% tax+ pension/insurance fees. Food is much cheaper here, too. 1 kilo beef= 9 euros
1 kilo Gouda cheese 6 euros. Chardonnay= 3 euros Heineken Beer=0,80 Starbucks=2 euros 10 apples=1 euro, 10 oranges 2 euros, cucumber 0,70 ct pine apple 1,80.
Lease car 250/month.
Korean prices 2010 (when I left) beef=80.000  Real Gouda (itaewon) 60.000 well for the rest I guess you know better than I now... 8)

There are some schools looking for US/UK native speakers but you have to enroll at an educational degree programme at the many semi online Colleges of Teaching  here as well to get a Bed/Med.while teaching here. I have met 6 at college and currently work now with 3 other native speakers. They have a slight preference towards RP. (UK accents)


To compare, min. wage is 900 euros.
« Last Edit: February 12, 2019, 12:06:45 PM by SanderB »
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 but some students... :wink:

Offline alexisalex

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Re: Life after teaching in Korea
« Reply #22 on: February 12, 2019, 11:54:20 AM »
What country?  Need EU passport, correct?  Sounds too good to be true.  5600 Euro.. then 50% taxes..  so 2300 EURO?

Holland- max would be 3530 at 35% tax. Food is much cheaper here, too. 1 kilo beef= 9 euros
1 kilo Gouda cheese 6 euros. Chardonnay= 3 euros Heineken Beer=0,80 Starbucks=2 euros 10 apples=1 euro, 10 oranges 2 euros, cucumber 0,70 ct pine apple 1,80.
Lease car 250/month.
Korean prices 2010 (when I left) beef=80.000  Real Gouda (itaewon) 60.000 well for the rest I guess you know better than I now... 8)

There are some schools looking for US/UK native speakers but you have to enroll at a Teacher's College as well to get a Bed/Med.while teaching here. I have met 6 at college and currently work now with 3 other native speakers. They have a slight preference towards RP. (UK accents)


To compare, min. wage is 900 euros.

That sounds very attractive.

Do you mean that they take people without teaching certificates initially?  Then assist you financially while you study?

Offline debbiem89

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Re: Life after teaching in Korea
« Reply #23 on: February 12, 2019, 12:33:47 PM »
What country?  Need EU passport, correct?  Sounds too good to be true.  5600 Euro.. then 50% taxes..  so 2300 EURO?

Holland- But the shortages are widespread all over the EU  -UK, BELGIUM, GERMANY, SWEDEN etc- max would be 3530 at 35% tax+ pension/insurance fees. Food is much cheaper here, too. 1 kilo beef= 9 euros
1 kilo Gouda cheese 6 euros. Chardonnay= 3 euros Heineken Beer=0,80 Starbucks=2 euros 10 apples=1 euro, 10 oranges 2 euros, cucumber 0,70 ct pine apple 1,80.
Lease car 250/month.
Korean prices 2010 (when I left) beef=80.000  Real Gouda (itaewon) 60.000 well for the rest I guess you know better than I now... 8)

There are some schools looking for US/UK native speakers but you have to enroll at an educational degree programme at the many semi online Colleges of Teaching  here as well to get a Bed/Med.while teaching here. I have met 6 at college and currently work now with 3 other native speakers. They have a slight preference towards RP. (UK accents)


To compare, min. wage is 900 euros.

Sorry but some of the countries you mentioned are SUPER expensive. I'm not sure if you're referring solely to Holland (which I've visited and it certainly wasn't cheap!). Sounds like your guesses are way off to me.

Korea is expensive in some ways (groceries) but then eating out is a hell of a lot cheaper. Swings and roundabouts (God I hate that phrase!)

Online eggieguffer

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Re: Life after teaching in Korea
« Reply #24 on: February 12, 2019, 01:04:15 PM »
Quote
eating out is a hell of a lot cheaper.

Depends what kind of restaurant. I assume you mean eating out at the bottom end of the scale. Eating out at a greasy spoon in the UK is comparable to Korea price-wise. Mid range restaurants are probably pricier if you include wine
« Last Edit: February 12, 2019, 01:21:08 PM by eggieguffer »

Offline debbiem89

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Re: Life after teaching in Korea
« Reply #25 on: February 12, 2019, 01:20:21 PM »
Quote
eating out is a hell of a lot cheaper.

Depends what kind of restaurant. I assume you mean eating out at the bottom end of the scale. Eating out at a greasy spoon in the UK is comparable to Korea price-wise.

Hm I don't know if I agree. I'm not from London even and I find it much cheaper. Maybe some joints are comparable but overall I've noticed a big difference...I mean we don't even get free water at the places in the U.K...

Online Savant

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Re: Life after teaching in Korea
« Reply #26 on: February 12, 2019, 01:31:35 PM »
Quote
eating out is a hell of a lot cheaper.

Depends what kind of restaurant. I assume you mean eating out at the bottom end of the scale. Eating out at a greasy spoon in the UK is comparable to Korea price-wise.

Hm I don't know if I agree. I'm not from London even and I find it much cheaper. Maybe some joints are comparable but overall I've noticed a big difference...I mean we don't even get free water at the places in the U.K...

Never asked for tap water in a UK restaurant?

Online eggieguffer

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Re: Life after teaching in Korea
« Reply #27 on: February 12, 2019, 01:31:45 PM »
Sausage and chips for under 5,000 won?

https://regencycafe.has.restaurant/menu/


Online Savant

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Re: Life after teaching in Korea
« Reply #28 on: February 12, 2019, 01:34:55 PM »
Sausage and chips for under 5,000 won?

https://regencycafe.has.restaurant/menu/

Even Weatherspoons is decently priced if you go on one of their special food days.

Online SanderB

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Re: Life after teaching in Korea
« Reply #29 on: February 13, 2019, 02:35:40 AM »
Quote
Do you mean that they take people without teaching certificates initially?  Then assist you financially while you study?

Maybe it might be harder for US citizens. But native speaker job openings do come around each year.

Yes, with a Ba degree ofc. That's how my US/UK colleagues have started their careers.

If you are an English major it will take you 1 year to get your license, otherwise 4 yrs. Meanwhile, schools are allowed to employ you unaccredited. It is a lot more work than in Korea, because it is highly professional and differentiated towards the individual student, so no mass TOEIC review classes where the Korean teacher yells out ibon b, sambon a, etc.  but personal feedback and scaffolding to prepare students for the C2 CPE exam. Btw, Tesol is fairly useless here.

The shortages in elementary are even more acute. But wages are lower.

But before considering mainland EU, why not check out UK? I hear they have similar shortages and government grants for starting teachers, ofc. finding an English teaching job vacancy might prove challenging but they must be out there.
--------------------
Prices, yes I'm only talking about supermarket prices.
proof
https://imgur.com/N95EtmN

« Last Edit: February 13, 2019, 03:39:57 AM by SanderB »
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Online SanderB

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Re: Life after teaching in Korea
« Reply #30 on: February 13, 2019, 03:14:27 AM »
.I mean we don't even get free water at the places in the U.K...…

I know right, I'm too embarrassed to NOT  order San Pellegrino each time I eat out, but tap tastes even better here... ;D
« Last Edit: February 13, 2019, 03:22:40 AM by SanderB »
-Magister non olet- 
 but some students... :wink: