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Author Topic: Funding for Native English Teacher in Rural Public Schools?  (Read 1803 times)

Offline topthemorningtoya

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Funding for Native English Teacher in Rural Public Schools?
« on: December 10, 2018, 03:26:07 PM »
Hi all,

How many students need to be in a Public Elementary School before funding for a Native English Teacher is cut completely?

Side note, also in a very rural country elementary school.

Offline SeoulAlone

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Re: Funding for Native English Teacher in Rural Public Schools?
« Reply #1 on: December 11, 2018, 07:47:26 AM »
I was talking to one of the girls I met at orientation and she told me one of hers rural schools is so small that the entire student body is 15 students. 

Offline thunderlips

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Re: Funding for Native English Teacher in Rural Public Schools?
« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2018, 07:49:58 AM »
Varies by county and provinces. Also some rural positions are paid by local businesses to give students the opportunity. But I suppose everything has a breaking point.

Offline Kayos

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Re: Funding for Native English Teacher in Rural Public Schools?
« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2018, 08:05:55 AM »
I was talking to one of the girls I met at orientation and she told me one of hers rural schools is so small that the entire student body is 15 students.

I had 13 students in a rural school last year.
And in a different town, I had a rural school of 10 students.
I knew a NET that was at a school with 7 students too. He left after his 1 year though. :p

Offline Mezoti97

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Re: Funding for Native English Teacher in Rural Public Schools?
« Reply #4 on: December 11, 2018, 10:40:04 AM »
One of the rural public elementary schools where I used to go teach at once a week several years ago, had a total of maybe less than 20 students in the school's entire student body (kindergarten through 6th grade).

Online Piggydee

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Re: Funding for Native English Teacher in Rural Public Schools?
« Reply #5 on: December 11, 2018, 12:01:54 PM »
I heard it was 5 students per class.  If it drops under 5 then a teacher, not necessarily the English teacher (but it could be) gets cut.  But based on these stats that I'm hearing about other schools and them having only 10 students grand total then I'll say maybe this is just a rule for my main school.   :-[

Offline sojuadventurer

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Re: Funding for Native English Teacher in Rural Public Schools?
« Reply #6 on: December 11, 2018, 12:03:40 PM »
I miss the good old days when you could be the full-time NET at a rural school; where you had only a handful of kids to deal with and they typically had much better behavior than city kids. The only downside was only having one class per grade; meaning that every class was an extra lesson plan.

Offline thunderlips

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Re: Funding for Native English Teacher in Rural Public Schools?
« Reply #7 on: December 11, 2018, 12:44:51 PM »
I miss the good old days when you could be the full-time NET at a rural school; where you had only a handful of kids to deal with and they typically had much better behavior than city kids. The only downside was only having one class per grade; meaning that every class was an extra lesson plan.

I must be in a time warp.

Online MayorHaggar

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Re: Funding for Native English Teacher in Rural Public Schools?
« Reply #8 on: December 13, 2018, 03:44:06 AM »
My second job in Chungbuk was at a school with like 50 students. I didn't have any travel schools and just taught there every day. 3rd and 4th grade had like 15 students each. 5th grade literally had 3. Chungbuk non-renewed everyone on a spring contract the next year so I left for hagwon world, but I really didn't mind losing the job, it felt pretty pointless.

The year before I was in a small rural town where most teachers were farmed out to multiple farm schools, some with like 5 students in the whole school, but there wasn't anyone solely stationed at these super small schools. There was one guy whose main job was at an elementary school with like 15 students but he also had a bunch of travel schools. After the aforementioned Chungbuk cuts the remaining teachers had to do like 10 travel schools a week.

If your school has less than say 100 students (common in rural areas) I wouldn't expect your job to be very permanent. At some point someone in the MOE will get a bug up their ass and make these into travel schools instead of main schools.
« Last Edit: December 13, 2018, 03:47:19 AM by MayorHaggar »
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Offline debbiem89

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Re: Funding for Native English Teacher in Rural Public Schools?
« Reply #9 on: December 13, 2018, 03:00:28 PM »
I don't think it necessarily works that way.

It totally depends on what province you are in.

I was in Gyeongsangbukdo and a new rule came into place to say that there could not be an EPIK teacher in a school where there were ANY contract English teachers (since they decided it was basically the same role, just teaching conversation).

My schools were both huge and had multiple contract teachers...so when I left they couldn't replace me. This happened to loads of schools across the province as the budgets were slashed.

My point is the size of the school doesn't necessarily reflect the budget or how it's allocated.

Offline hangook77

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Re: Funding for Native English Teacher in Rural Public Schools?
« Reply #10 on: December 17, 2018, 12:05:30 AM »
I don't think it necessarily works that way.

It totally depends on what province you are in.

I was in Gyeongsangbukdo and a new rule came into place to say that there could not be an EPIK teacher in a school where there were ANY contract English teachers (since they decided it was basically the same role, just teaching conversation).

My schools were both huge and had multiple contract teachers...so when I left they couldn't replace me. This happened to loads of schools across the province as the budgets were slashed.

My point is the size of the school doesn't necessarily reflect the budget or how it's allocated.

This was a few years ago when the cuts were brought in?  I thought many places have ramped up their hiring again.  Though it's still not what it use to be.

Online Renma

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Re: Funding for Native English Teacher in Rural Public Schools?
« Reply #11 on: December 17, 2018, 11:59:41 AM »
I don't think it necessarily works that way.

It totally depends on what province you are in.

I was in Gyeongsangbukdo and a new rule came into place to say that there could not be an EPIK teacher in a school where there were ANY contract English teachers (since they decided it was basically the same role, just teaching conversation).

My schools were both huge and had multiple contract teachers...so when I left they couldn't replace me. This happened to loads of schools across the province as the budgets were slashed.

My point is the size of the school doesn't necessarily reflect the budget or how it's allocated.

This was a few years ago when the cuts were brought in?  I thought many places have ramped up their hiring again.  Though it's still not what it use to be.

This was in 2017.

Online kyndo

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Re: Funding for Native English Teacher in Rural Public Schools?
« Reply #12 on: December 17, 2018, 01:22:59 PM »
I don't think it necessarily works that way.

It totally depends on what province you are in.

I was in Gyeongsangbukdo and a new rule came into place to say that there could not be an EPIK teacher in a school where there were ANY contract English teachers (since they decided it was basically the same role, just teaching conversation).

My schools were both huge and had multiple contract teachers...so when I left they couldn't replace me. This happened to loads of schools across the province as the budgets were slashed.

My point is the size of the school doesn't necessarily reflect the budget or how it's allocated.
     Actually, it *is* still possible to have more than one subject-contract teacher per school in Gyeong-buk, as the change only affected funding. The POE will now only fund one contract teacher per subject per school. In reality, what this new rule did was force the schools who had more than one subject-contract teacher to choose which one they wanted to keep, and to let the rest go. I worked at the same middle school for almost six years, but they had 2 Korean contract teachers who also taught English, one of which was a genuinely fantastic teacher, and who also had training in teaching special needs students. I wasn't at all surprised when the school decided to keep her. It was actually pretty amusing how bad my school felt about letting me go: they gave me perfect evaluations, threw me a giant get-lost party, and still ask me to come teach all their winter/summer/weekend camps, which is nice.

Online Life Improvement

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Re: Funding for Native English Teacher in Rural Public Schools?
« Reply #13 on: December 17, 2018, 01:45:16 PM »
This was a few years ago when the cuts were brought in?  I thought many places have ramped up their hiring again.  Though it's still not what it use to be.

E-2 visas:

2010 - 23,317 
2011 - 22,541 
2012 - 21,603 
2013 - 20,030 
2014 - 17,949 
2015 - 16,144 
2016 - 15,450
2017 - 14,352
2018 - 13,897


Looks like demand is shrinking.  :-[

Offline hangook77

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Re: Funding for Native English Teacher in Rural Public Schools?
« Reply #14 on: December 17, 2018, 03:06:30 PM »
This was a few years ago when the cuts were brought in?  I thought many places have ramped up their hiring again.  Though it's still not what it use to be.

E-2 visas:

2010 - 23,317 
2011 - 22,541 
2012 - 21,603 
2013 - 20,030 
2014 - 17,949 
2015 - 16,144 
2016 - 15,450
2017 - 14,352
2018 - 13,897


Looks like demand is shrinking.  :-[

Better economy is the US with more jobs and China hiring has siphoned off teachrs too.  The Great recession flooded the market.  Jobs were very competitive and hard to get from 2009 to 2014 2015 or so.  Cuts started at SMOE in 2012 and then GEPIK and later EPIK by 2014 and 2015.  I had thought the positions stabilized.  You don't hear of positions being cut anymore.  My guess is if you aren't fussy about location, a public school job is easy to get compared to 5 or 6 years ago where everyone was coming here to escape the recession back home.  I don't doubt there aren't some declines in private academies though. 

Offline debbiem89

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Re: Funding for Native English Teacher in Rural Public Schools?
« Reply #15 on: December 18, 2018, 10:12:19 AM »
I don't think it necessarily works that way.

It totally depends on what province you are in.

I was in Gyeongsangbukdo and a new rule came into place to say that there could not be an EPIK teacher in a school where there were ANY contract English teachers (since they decided it was basically the same role, just teaching conversation).

My schools were both huge and had multiple contract teachers...so when I left they couldn't replace me. This happened to loads of schools across the province as the budgets were slashed.

My point is the size of the school doesn't necessarily reflect the budget or how it's allocated.
     Actually, it *is* still possible to have more than one subject-contract teacher per school in Gyeong-buk, as the change only affected funding. The POE will now only fund one contract teacher per subject per school. In reality, what this new rule did was force the schools who had more than one subject-contract teacher to choose which one they wanted to keep, and to let the rest go. I worked at the same middle school for almost six years, but they had 2 Korean contract teachers who also taught English, one of which was a genuinely fantastic teacher, and who also had training in teaching special needs students. I wasn't at all surprised when the school decided to keep her. It was actually pretty amusing how bad my school felt about letting me go: they gave me perfect evaluations, threw me a giant get-lost party, and still ask me to come teach all their winter/summer/weekend camps, which is nice.

Wait I'm confused by your comment. You seem to say it's possible to have more than one...but then go on to explain how they cut all the others? So they can have more but chose not to?

In 2016/17 when this happened we very specifically got told by the POE that this was the case, EPIK teachers were considered to be contract english teachers so if your school already had one...off you go. Literally the city I worked in maybe one of the EPIK teachers who left that year got replaced. I went to training that Summer and the amount of teachers for that POE was dramatically lower, my specific city they were recruiting one new teacher (compared to 15-20 my intake).

The one at my school was garbage..but she'd literally just resigned when the rule came. My main co teacher was absolutely livid she had to keep her and let the rest go.

Offline debbiem89

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Re: Funding for Native English Teacher in Rural Public Schools?
« Reply #16 on: December 18, 2018, 10:14:14 AM »
I don't think it necessarily works that way.

It totally depends on what province you are in.

I was in Gyeongsangbukdo and a new rule came into place to say that there could not be an EPIK teacher in a school where there were ANY contract English teachers (since they decided it was basically the same role, just teaching conversation).

My schools were both huge and had multiple contract teachers...so when I left they couldn't replace me. This happened to loads of schools across the province as the budgets were slashed.

My point is the size of the school doesn't necessarily reflect the budget or how it's allocated.

This was a few years ago when the cuts were brought in?  I thought many places have ramped up their hiring again.  Though it's still not what it use to be.

This was 2017! Gyeongbuk province just basically decided that the contract english teachers and EPIK teachers were basically doing the same thing (since they don't have home rooms or any other responsibilities). I guess due to the cuts they decided this was a good area to save some money!

Online kyndo

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Re: Funding for Native English Teacher in Rural Public Schools?
« Reply #17 on: December 18, 2018, 10:22:40 AM »
Wait I'm confused by your comment. You seem to say it's possible to have more than one...but then go on to explain how they cut all the others? So they can have more but chose not to?

In 2016/17 when this happened we very specifically got told by the POE that this was the case, EPIK teachers were considered to be contract english teachers so if your school already had one...off you go. Literally the city I worked in maybe one of the EPIK teachers who left that year got replaced. I went to training that Summer and the amount of teachers for that POE was dramatically lower, my specific city they were recruiting one new teacher (compared to 15-20 my intake).

The one at my school was garbage..but she'd literally just resigned when the rule came. My main co teacher was absolutely livid she had to keep her and let the rest go.
     Sorry if I wasn't being clear.
    My impression is that schools can keep as many contract teachers as they like, but they will have to cough up money for it themselves as the POE will only fund one contract teacher at a time (per subject, I believe). I know of a Catholic Foundation schools that retained both their contract NET and their contract KET, probably because their funding was not primarily from the POE.
Also, there was no special rule about which contract teacher the schools would need to release. I'm fairly sure that that was up to the school's discretion.

Online Renma

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Re: Funding for Native English Teacher in Rural Public Schools?
« Reply #18 on: December 18, 2018, 01:19:34 PM »

Also, there was no special rule about which contract teacher the schools would need to release. I'm fairly sure that that was up to the school's discretion.

At the time, my (contract) coteacher said the KET's got priority/first pick for renewal over NET's. She had decided to move on however, so I was allowed to renew at the same school.

Of course the school could decide to not offer renewal if they didn't like the person in question. IIRC at another school the Korean contract teacher had to re-interview alongside other applicants to keep her position.

Offline hangook77

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Re: Funding for Native English Teacher in Rural Public Schools?
« Reply #19 on: December 19, 2018, 07:49:25 AM »
Where ever I worked, the contract teachers taught the class like any other the same way a regular full time teacher did.  There was no difference in their classes.  Whereas our classes were different in the sense we added games and other activities and of course the kids would speak in English or try to to us because we weren't Korean.  Of course I am speaking from the perspective of middle school.