January 22, 2019, 08:37:43 PM


Author Topic: Attitude towards foreign teachers  (Read 5871 times)

Online Savant

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Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #140 on: December 18, 2018, 10:20:13 AM »
The ajummas definitely don't discriminate with their thrown elbows as they swim their way to the back of a crowded bus  :laugh:. Not in my area, anyway.

If I ever needed a bodyguard, I'd hire an old Korean lady, and tell her, anyone who gets close to me, is trying to take your seat on the subway!
When I used to live near Busan, the old Korean ladies were vicious while trying to get onto the subway. They'd elbow / push ANYONE out of the way, to get on quick and get their seat. haha

"The Foreign Teacher's Bodyguard" starring Samuel L. Jackson as the foreign teacher and typecast Asian lady [or Scarlett Johansson] as the bodyguard.

Offline ESLinsider

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Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #141 on: December 20, 2018, 04:02:27 AM »

So is this a thing other people have experienced? Almost as if the students have learnt not to respect the foreign teacher as much? As if they donít need to take use or our lessons as seriously?

Maybe the teachers you replaced did not do a very good job with managing students. It's best to be firm and if you say you are going to do something then do it. Also even if you think your classroom management is good and your lesson stinks then you will still have problems.

Gotta keep your lessons active, varied and fun.
Who is ESLinsider?

Online orange6ur1

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Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #142 on: December 20, 2018, 07:49:51 AM »
So is this a thing other people have experienced? Almost as if the students have learnt not to respect the foreign teacher as much? As if they donít need to take use or our lessons as seriously?

Maybe the teachers you replaced did not do a very good job with managing students. It's best to be firm and if you say you are going to do something then do it. Also even if you think your classroom management is good and your lesson stinks then you will still have problems.

Gotta keep your lessons active, varied and fun.
i may be in the unpopular opinion but i still think it's not really because you're a foreigner but more to do with just taking advantage of you because you're all nice and fun (and also maybe young or foreign) vs stern.
 
ive seen students act terrible to their own head teacher and that teacher never yells, never disciplines students, just helplessly stands there trying to teach. it's....sad. 

even if your activities are boring or whatever they should still do it and behave.

i guess it's up to you how strict you wanna be and how often and it depends on your teaching pedagogy or whatever

Online Chinguetti

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Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #143 on: December 20, 2018, 10:12:31 AM »
Kids target perceived vulnerability. If they want to misbehave, they'll test and push to find out how much they can get away with, regardless of your background. If they're coming from a place where they've consistently managed to get away with certain behaviors against certain types of people, though, say undisciplined hagwon environments where NETs receive very little to no respect and support from management or the owners, they're far more likely to target people with the same characteristics and push them in the same way. If you're passive, this is 100x worse, because kids pick up on that real quick.

So, yes, being foreign can be a variable as many kids feel that this is an exploitable weakness because many of them believe and/or have learned that they can excuse or justify a lot of their behavior by hiding behind cultural differences and language barrier defenses. Kids also learn to bully from others, be it from their peers or family, and will target the same people as those around them do -- even if being a foreigner is not a reason for their misbehavior, they'll often use it as justification for it, depending on their age group. Their parents' beliefs and attitudes about and towards foreigners might also be a factor in the lack of respect they might have for a foreigner vs. a Korean adult.

I, for example, usually end up commanding just as much respect from my students as all of the KTs in my school. In fact, many students become more intimidated by me than they are of other KTs as the school semester wears on because I catch them in lies more often and I'm quicker to discipline. But it doesn't start off that way.

I get tested a LOT more by students at the beginning of every school year than all of the KTs do, simply because the students think that I'm not as perceptive as the KTs are due to the language barrier. It's stupid, but that's how they think at first, especially from the ones that are coming from (and probably still attend) really shitty hagwons that reinforce this idea.

How rooted this idea is totally depends on the kids' environment (i.e. community). So it can be really terrible in one area and non-existent in another.

Offline alexisalex

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Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #144 on: December 20, 2018, 10:31:21 AM »
I actually think it's best to not come straight out of the gate with a "thou shalt respect me" attitude with the students.  If I were a student sitting in front of a (most likely) young foreigner with no teaching experience and the first thing they did was give me a stoney faced lecture about respect, they would have instantly lost my respect in a weird way.

Treat students like normal people and I think the default setting should be warmth and kindness.  Laugh with them and allow a little bit of cheekiness.  Don't take yourself too seriously.

I've had to deal with some notoriously "bad" classes but I found that if you treat them with a bit of respect then it gets reciprocated. 

So yeah, don't be a pushover but don't be a drill sergeant either.

Online Datasapien

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Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #145 on: December 20, 2018, 10:48:24 AM »
Treat students like normal people and I think the default setting should be warmth and kindness.  Laugh with them and allow a little bit of cheekiness.  Don't take yourself too seriously.

+1 for dayz. If the kids like you, they will listen to you.
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Online Chinguetti

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Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #146 on: December 20, 2018, 11:29:37 AM »
I actually think it's best to not come straight out of the gate with a "thou shalt respect me" attitude with the students.  If I were a student sitting in front of a (most likely) young foreigner with no teaching experience and the first thing they did was give me a stoney faced lecture about respect, they would have instantly lost my respect in a weird way.

Treat students like normal people and I think the default setting should be warmth and kindness.  Laugh with them and allow a little bit of cheekiness.  Don't take yourself too seriously.

I've had to deal with some notoriously "bad" classes but I found that if you treat them with a bit of respect then it gets reciprocated. 

So yeah, don't be a pushover but don't be a drill sergeant either.

This, too. Even when you're fighting against prejudice, if you give the kids a chance to get to know you and to like you, and you at least seem sincere in wanting to interact with them, you'll win them over more easily. Sometimes you have to bring down the hammer, but more often than not you just need to see them eye-to-eye.

I tend to be super strict at the beginning of a semester (that doesn't mean having no sense of humor, though, and never playing or being cheeky with the students), and then lighten up as the semester moves on.

Offline #basedcowboyshirt

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Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #147 on: December 20, 2018, 11:47:08 AM »
I actually think it's best to not come straight out of the gate with a "thou shalt respect me" attitude with the students.  If I were a student sitting in front of a (most likely) young foreigner with no teaching experience and the first thing they did was give me a stoney faced lecture about respect, they would have instantly lost my respect in a weird way.

Treat students like normal people and I think the default setting should be warmth and kindness.  Laugh with them and allow a little bit of cheekiness.  Don't take yourself too seriously.

I've had to deal with some notoriously "bad" classes but I found that if you treat them with a bit of respect then it gets reciprocated. 

So yeah, don't be a pushover but don't be a drill sergeant either.

This, too. Even when you're fighting against prejudice, if you give the kids a chance to get to know you and to like you, and you at least seem sincere in wanting to interact with them, you'll win them over more easily. Sometimes you have to bring down the hammer, but more often than not you just need to see them eye-to-eye.

I tend to be super strict at the beginning of a semester (that doesn't mean having no sense of humor, though, and never playing or being cheeky with the students), and then lighten up as the semester moves on.

Absolutely this (by both waygook.org user alexisalex and waygook.org user Chinguetti).

Anyone who feels they need to roll up and do a whole thing about how they must be respected probably isn't the sort of person who naturally commands a lot of respect from others. In a lot of cases, I think it comes across as kind of insecure. Like, nobody's done anything bad yet - relax.

Just be chill, and if students do something rude or disrespectful, then get a little more disciplinary.

But I've found that starting from a place where you treat students as if they're decent people is generally a good way to get them to behave like decent people.