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Author Topic: Attitude towards foreign teachers  (Read 3463 times)

Online APH

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Attitude towards foreign teachers
« on: December 04, 2018, 11:42:35 PM »
So Iíve been working at my Hagwon for just over 2 months now and whilst Iím lucky that most of my students are well behaved, thereís a portion of them who are so rude and disrespectful towards me itís shocked me. I teach kindergarten classes in the morning and elementary classes in the afternoons and most of the students who cause problems are in the elementary classes. Screaming at me, refusing to do any work, ignoring me and just being generally disrespectful towards me.

Initially I thought I must just not be commanding enough respect as their teacher or maybe my classroom management is off. However the way theyíre acting sometimes makes me think theyíre almost used to teaching the foreign teachers this way. I see the way they are with the Korean teachers and itís completely different. One class seemed totally shocked one lesson as I was explaining some work they needed to do, as if they didnít realise I was here to be a teacher and set them work. I lost my temper with one class and the looks on their faces seemed like theyíd never seen a foreign teacher raise their voice before. They just do things sometimes which I would have never dreamt of doing or saying to a teacher but are nothing but angelic to the Korean teachers.

So is this a thing other people have experienced? Almost as if the students have learnt not to respect the foreign teacher as much? As if they donít need to take use or our lessons as seriously?

Offline thunderlips

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Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #1 on: December 05, 2018, 06:36:18 AM »
Itís called xenophobia mixed with some good ole fashioned discrimination. They know there isnít any real punishment and they view NETS as a pet chimp.

Iíve also noticed it is more prevalent among younger students. Most likely they havenít learned to hide their disgust of anything foreign yet.

Online some waygug-in

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Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #2 on: December 05, 2018, 06:57:56 AM »
My first class teaching Korean kids was a nightmare trying to control; it all went downhill from there. 8)

I had 1 class of 10 - 12 year olds (I'm guessing); as soon as I reached the front of the classroom

and had turned to face them, they all on cue gave me the finger and screamed "buck yooo" and then

the fun just started.   There was no hope of trying to "control" the students as the manager would side

with the students every time.   My main approach ended up being that I tried to get them to do a couple of

pages in their books  followed by a game (if they were finished).   

There wasn't a lot of "teaching" happening.   


Offline fishead

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Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #3 on: December 05, 2018, 07:13:55 AM »
Most of these things can easily be rectified as long as you don't leave the situation too long and allow the sitaution to really fester.
 Profanity should never be tolerated. It's a slipperly slope and can lead to absolute anarchy. You need to call them out on that behavour and make sure it never happens again.
     
Have any of you approached your directors and talked about this problem. Team teaching would be one possible solution. Even having a Korean sitting at the back doing some of their administrative work and sometimes interviening when things get really bad.

 Do any of you stand at the entrance of the classroom and only let them in when they appear calm and polite. The mad buffalo rush always fails.

 Giving them English nametags and make them answer questions during class.

Offline thunderlips

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Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #4 on: December 05, 2018, 07:43:04 AM »
Most of these things can easily be rectified as long as you don't leave the situation too long and allow the sitaution to really fester.
 Profanity should never be tolerated. It's a slipperly slope and can lead to absolute anarchy. You need to call them out on that behavour and make sure it never happens again.
     
Have any of you approached your directors and talked about this problem. Team teaching would be one possible solution. Even having a Korean sitting at the back doing some of their administrative work and sometimes interviening when things get really bad.

 Do any of you stand at the entrance of the classroom and only let them in when they appear calm and polite. The mad buffalo rush always fails.

 Giving them English nametags and make them answer questions during class.

I make them choose Japanese names.

Offline sh9wntm

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Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #5 on: December 05, 2018, 07:56:30 AM »
I lost my temper with one class and the looks on their faces seemed like theyíd never seen a foreign teacher raise their voice before. They just do things sometimes which I would have never dreamt of doing or saying to a teacher but are nothing but angelic to the Korean teachers.

So is this a thing other people have experienced? Almost as if the students have learnt not to respect the foreign teacher as much? As if they donít need to take use or our lessons as seriously?

Yes. They treat you sort of like a substitute would back home. Absolutely must stand up for ourselves without anger. From day 1 we must make it clear we are not to be messed with. Reward positive behavior and punish negative behavior. Reward with games and candy (sometimes), punish with more worksheets, making them sit in "time out", and if it's really bad write a note to their parents for them to sign. That'll surely embarrass the socks off everyone.

Offline Kayos

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Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #6 on: December 05, 2018, 08:09:02 AM »
Most of these things can easily be rectified as long as you don't leave the situation too long and allow the sitaution to really fester.
 Profanity should never be tolerated. It's a slipperly slope and can lead to absolute anarchy. You need to call them out on that behavour and make sure it never happens again.
     
Have any of you approached your directors and talked about this problem. Team teaching would be one possible solution. Even having a Korean sitting at the back doing some of their administrative work and sometimes interviening when things get really bad.

 Do any of you stand at the entrance of the classroom and only let them in when they appear calm and polite. The mad buffalo rush always fails.

 Giving them English nametags and make them answer questions during class.

I make them choose Japanese names.

I'm curious, how do the students take that?
I have one student that would hate that, but a few that would quite like that. :p

Offline thunderlips

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Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #7 on: December 05, 2018, 09:42:58 AM »
Most of these things can easily be rectified as long as you don't leave the situation too long and allow the sitaution to really fester.
 Profanity should never be tolerated. It's a slipperly slope and can lead to absolute anarchy. You need to call them out on that behavour and make sure it never happens again.
     
Have any of you approached your directors and talked about this problem. Team teaching would be one possible solution. Even having a Korean sitting at the back doing some of their administrative work and sometimes interviening when things get really bad.

 Do any of you stand at the entrance of the classroom and only let them in when they appear calm and polite. The mad buffalo rush always fails.

 Giving them English nametags and make them answer questions during class.

I make them choose Japanese names.

I'm curious, how do the students take that?
I have one student that would hate that, but a few that would quite like that. :p

I'm dumb but not stupid...  :laugh: :laugh:

I just don't like the force changing names. A good middle point for me is I use the students' Korean names but drop the family name, so Kim Chi duck would be Chi duck.

Offline lifeisgood6447

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Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #8 on: December 05, 2018, 10:00:34 AM »
Most of these things can easily be rectified as long as you don't leave the situation too long and allow the sitaution to really fester.
 Profanity should never be tolerated. It's a slipperly slope and can lead to absolute anarchy. You need to call them out on that behavour and make sure it never happens again.
     
Have any of you approached your directors and talked about this problem. Team teaching would be one possible solution. Even having a Korean sitting at the back doing some of their administrative work and sometimes interviening when things get really bad.

 Do any of you stand at the entrance of the classroom and only let them in when they appear calm and polite. The mad buffalo rush always fails.

 Giving them English nametags and make them answer questions during class.

I make them choose Japanese names.

I'm curious, how do the students take that?
I have one student that would hate that, but a few that would quite like that. :p

I'm dumb but not stupid...  :laugh: :laugh:

I just don't like the force changing names. A good middle point for me is I use the students' Korean names but drop the family name, so Kim Chi duck would be Chi duck.

I do the same, and they have no problem distinguishing who you're talking about, especially as there aren't that many with the same first names in every class. I will say that knowing their names and calling on them individually gets their attention quite well.

Offline Kayos

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Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #9 on: December 05, 2018, 10:08:41 AM »
Most of these things can easily be rectified as long as you don't leave the situation too long and allow the sitaution to really fester.
 Profanity should never be tolerated. It's a slipperly slope and can lead to absolute anarchy. You need to call them out on that behavour and make sure it never happens again.
     
Have any of you approached your directors and talked about this problem. Team teaching would be one possible solution. Even having a Korean sitting at the back doing some of their administrative work and sometimes interviening when things get really bad.

 Do any of you stand at the entrance of the classroom and only let them in when they appear calm and polite. The mad buffalo rush always fails.

 Giving them English nametags and make them answer questions during class.

I make them choose Japanese names.

I'm curious, how do the students take that?
I have one student that would hate that, but a few that would quite like that. :p

I'm dumb but not stupid...  :laugh: :laugh:

I just don't like the force changing names. A good middle point for me is I use the students' Korean names but drop the family name, so Kim Chi duck would be Chi duck.

I have 1 student who absolutely hates Japan. Whenever one of the students that likes Japan / Japanese things / learning Japanese mentions Japan, he always goes on a big rant about how bad Japan is.
Though, the students who like Japan and stuff, would probably love having a Japanese name haha.
Which is why, I thought, getting the students to pick a Japanese name, might not -always- be a bad thing; but still being a bad thing like 99.9999999999999999% of the time. :p

Online oglop

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Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #10 on: December 05, 2018, 10:19:18 AM »
the students i currently teach in an after school program are the rudest kids i've ever taught. this is almost 5 years of teaching elementary level in korea

there is just a complete lack of respect. they can't behave, do basic speaking activities, and are certainly not well enough behaved to play games. so they sit in silence all class, doing worksheets. i tell them if they want to do something fun, they have to behave. so, next class we try again, perhaps begin playing a game, and they are just as bad, so we do more worksheets in silence. rinse and repeat for a year

they then go home, tell their parents it's boring, the parents withdraw their kids from the program (or complain to the manager that "it's not fun"), then the manager complains that i'm not a good teacher because the kids want to all drop out and aren't having a good time :rolleyes:

Offline Mr.DeMartino

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Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #11 on: December 05, 2018, 11:00:19 AM »
I have 1 student who absolutely hates Japan. Whenever one of the students that likes Japan / Japanese things / learning Japanese mentions Japan, he always goes on a big rant about how bad Japan is.
Though, the students who like Japan and stuff, would probably love having a Japanese name haha.
Which is why, I thought, getting the students to pick a Japanese name, might not -always- be a bad thing; but still being a bad thing like 99.9999999999999999% of the time. :p
That's about as good of an idea of having a teacher deal with rambunctious Lebanese students by having them choose names of famous Israelis or having rambunctious Irish students take the names of various administrators from Britain's colonial past. If you want to take it up a notch, you could have all your rambunctious American inner city kids take Confederate/"hillbilly" names.

The whole being required "take a name other than your own" thing is ridiculous and should NEVER be practiced by a teacher, except on a voluntary/nickname/abbreviation/role-play basis. Address people by what their name is. That's basic human respect and decency and if you can't practice that, and think people should change their name to make life easier for you, you can piss off.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2018, 11:04:29 AM by Mr.DeMartino »

Offline Piggydee

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Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #12 on: December 05, 2018, 11:18:09 AM »
I have 1 student who absolutely hates Japan. Whenever one of the students that likes Japan / Japanese things / learning Japanese mentions Japan, he always goes on a big rant about how bad Japan is.
Though, the students who like Japan and stuff, would probably love having a Japanese name haha.
Which is why, I thought, getting the students to pick a Japanese name, might not -always- be a bad thing; but still being a bad thing like 99.9999999999999999% of the time. :p
That's about as good of an idea of having a teacher deal with rambunctious Lebanese students by having them choose names of famous Israelis or having rambunctious Irish students take the names of various administrators from Britain's colonial past. If you want to take it up a notch, you could have all your rambunctious American inner city kids take Confederate/"hillbilly" names.

The whole being required "take a name other than your own" thing is ridiculous and should NEVER be practiced by a teacher, except on a voluntary/nickname/abbreviation/role-play basis. Address people by what their name is. That's basic human respect and decency and if you can't practice that, and think people should change their name to make life easier for you, you can piss off.

+1  This!!  I agree.  I don't know doling out "Jabobs, Ashleys, Jessicas, Billys" makes me feel a little like a colonizers.  I just call my students by their birth names.   Are some hard for me to pronounce yeah but my name is hard for Koreans to pronounce too there a struggle had by both.  But I feel I'm being more respectful to the culture than being lazy and saying "F your birth name You're name is Larry.  I decided!" 

Offline thunderlips

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Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #13 on: December 05, 2018, 11:54:00 AM »
I have 1 student who absolutely hates Japan. Whenever one of the students that likes Japan / Japanese things / learning Japanese mentions Japan, he always goes on a big rant about how bad Japan is.
Though, the students who like Japan and stuff, would probably love having a Japanese name haha.
Which is why, I thought, getting the students to pick a Japanese name, might not -always- be a bad thing; but still being a bad thing like 99.9999999999999999% of the time. :p
That's about as good of an idea of having a teacher deal with rambunctious Lebanese students by having them choose names of famous Israelis or having rambunctious Irish students take the names of various administrators from Britain's colonial past. If you want to take it up a notch, you could have all your rambunctious American inner city kids take Confederate/"hillbilly" names.

The whole being required "take a name other than your own" thing is ridiculous and should NEVER be practiced by a teacher, except on a voluntary/nickname/abbreviation/role-play basis. Address people by what their name is. That's basic human respect and decency and if you can't practice that, and think people should change their name to make life easier for you, you can piss off.

+1  This!!  I agree.  I don't know doling out "Jabobs, Ashleys, Jessicas, Billys" makes me feel a little like a colonizers.  I just call my students by their birth names.   Are some hard for me to pronounce yeah but my name is hard for Koreans to pronounce too there a struggle had by both.  But I feel I'm being more respectful to the culture than being lazy and saying "F your birth name You're name is Larry.  I decided!"

From now on I'm naming all my students Larry. That is a great!  :P

Offline Kayos

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Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #14 on: December 05, 2018, 12:20:08 PM »
I have 1 student who absolutely hates Japan. Whenever one of the students that likes Japan / Japanese things / learning Japanese mentions Japan, he always goes on a big rant about how bad Japan is.
Though, the students who like Japan and stuff, would probably love having a Japanese name haha.
Which is why, I thought, getting the students to pick a Japanese name, might not -always- be a bad thing; but still being a bad thing like 99.9999999999999999% of the time. :p
That's about as good of an idea of having a teacher deal with rambunctious Lebanese students by having them choose names of famous Israelis or having rambunctious Irish students take the names of various administrators from Britain's colonial past. If you want to take it up a notch, you could have all your rambunctious American inner city kids take Confederate/"hillbilly" names.

The whole being required "take a name other than your own" thing is ridiculous and should NEVER be practiced by a teacher, except on a voluntary/nickname/abbreviation/role-play basis. Address people by what their name is. That's basic human respect and decency and if you can't practice that, and think people should change their name to make life easier for you, you can piss off.

I guess you didn't realize I wasn't being serious.

I mean, in my original message, I mentioned I was curious how it is taken (assuming that guy actually done that, which he mentioned, he isn't stupid enough to do that). And I know it wouldn't be taken well at all, here in Korea.

And this comment of mine was just, IF I did give students Japanese names (which I wouldn't, I don't even give them English names), I have a couple of students that wouldn't mind that.
Everything else was just joking around but, I guess my little ':P' didn't make that clear enough. D:
« Last Edit: December 05, 2018, 12:29:19 PM by Kayos »

Offline thunderlips

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Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #15 on: December 05, 2018, 12:39:44 PM »
I have 1 student who absolutely hates Japan. Whenever one of the students that likes Japan / Japanese things / learning Japanese mentions Japan, he always goes on a big rant about how bad Japan is.
Though, the students who like Japan and stuff, would probably love having a Japanese name haha.
Which is why, I thought, getting the students to pick a Japanese name, might not -always- be a bad thing; but still being a bad thing like 99.9999999999999999% of the time. :p
That's about as good of an idea of having a teacher deal with rambunctious Lebanese students by having them choose names of famous Israelis or having rambunctious Irish students take the names of various administrators from Britain's colonial past. If you want to take it up a notch, you could have all your rambunctious American inner city kids take Confederate/"hillbilly" names.

The whole being required "take a name other than your own" thing is ridiculous and should NEVER be practiced by a teacher, except on a voluntary/nickname/abbreviation/role-play basis. Address people by what their name is. That's basic human respect and decency and if you can't practice that, and think people should change their name to make life easier for you, you can piss off.

I guess you didn't realize I wasn't being serious.

I mean, in my original message, I mentioned I was curious how it is taken (assuming that guy actually done that, which he mentioned, he isn't stupid enough to do that). And I know it wouldn't be taken well at all, here in Korea.

And this comment of mine was just, IF I did give students Japanese names (which I wouldn't, I don't even give them English names), I have a couple of students that wouldn't mind that.
Everything else was just joking around but, I guess my little ':P' didn't make that clear enough. D:

I may be dumb enough though....

Offline Mr.DeMartino

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Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #16 on: December 05, 2018, 12:50:40 PM »
I guess you didn't realize I wasn't being serious.

I mean, in my original message, I mentioned I was curious how it is taken (assuming that guy actually done that, which he mentioned, he isn't stupid enough to do that). And I know it wouldn't be taken well at all, here in Korea.

And this comment of mine was just, IF I did give students Japanese names (which I wouldn't, I don't even give them English names), I have a couple of students that wouldn't mind that.
Everything else was just joking around but, I guess my little ':P' didn't make that clear enough. D:
No, I did. I should have clarified that I knew you weren't being serious and I was speaking in an "in general" manner and the "you" was a hypothetical-generalized "you" rather than you, specifically. My bad.

Offline Kayos

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Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #17 on: December 05, 2018, 12:55:50 PM »
I guess you didn't realize I wasn't being serious.

I mean, in my original message, I mentioned I was curious how it is taken (assuming that guy actually done that, which he mentioned, he isn't stupid enough to do that). And I know it wouldn't be taken well at all, here in Korea.

And this comment of mine was just, IF I did give students Japanese names (which I wouldn't, I don't even give them English names), I have a couple of students that wouldn't mind that.
Everything else was just joking around but, I guess my little ':P' didn't make that clear enough. D:
No, I did. I should have clarified that I knew you weren't being serious and I was speaking in an "in general" manner and the "you" was a hypothetical-generalized "you" rather than you, specifically. My bad.

Ahh my bad. Sorry, I misread it myself!

Offline Kayos

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Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #18 on: December 05, 2018, 01:07:02 PM »
I have 1 student who absolutely hates Japan. Whenever one of the students that likes Japan / Japanese things / learning Japanese mentions Japan, he always goes on a big rant about how bad Japan is.
Though, the students who like Japan and stuff, would probably love having a Japanese name haha.
Which is why, I thought, getting the students to pick a Japanese name, might not -always- be a bad thing; but still being a bad thing like 99.9999999999999999% of the time. :p
That's about as good of an idea of having a teacher deal with rambunctious Lebanese students by having them choose names of famous Israelis or having rambunctious Irish students take the names of various administrators from Britain's colonial past. If you want to take it up a notch, you could have all your rambunctious American inner city kids take Confederate/"hillbilly" names.

The whole being required "take a name other than your own" thing is ridiculous and should NEVER be practiced by a teacher, except on a voluntary/nickname/abbreviation/role-play basis. Address people by what their name is. That's basic human respect and decency and if you can't practice that, and think people should change their name to make life easier for you, you can piss off.

I guess you didn't realize I wasn't being serious.

I mean, in my original message, I mentioned I was curious how it is taken (assuming that guy actually done that, which he mentioned, he isn't stupid enough to do that). And I know it wouldn't be taken well at all, here in Korea.

And this comment of mine was just, IF I did give students Japanese names (which I wouldn't, I don't even give them English names), I have a couple of students that wouldn't mind that.
Everything else was just joking around but, I guess my little ':P' didn't make that clear enough. D:

I may be dumb enough though....

If you try it, let me know how it goes. :p

Offline PatrickBateman

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Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #19 on: December 05, 2018, 01:13:33 PM »
I'd say the majority get raised with the uninara 우리나라 mantra and are brainwashed from birth that they are a special unique breed of human and other 외국인 are not the same and are not needed to be treated with the same respect.  I, too, was shocked how some students spoke to me, even in front of other Korean teachers.  The Korean teacher barely scolded the students.  So it just reinforces the bad attitudes and behavior.  That's because said Korean teacher doesn't respect you any more than the students do in the majority of instances.  Koreans don't want to be multicultural or mixed raced.  If they could keep this place sealed tight and not let a foreigner in the country they would.  Obviously, with globalism and business, plus the cheap labor they need to import, it's an impossibility. We're a necessary evil they tolerate but don't respect.  Of course, there are many wonderful Korean adults and their kids are usually great too.  Those are the Koreans that are worldly and open-minded and treat all humans regardless of place of birth with respect.