February 17, 2019, 01:58:29 AM


Author Topic: Your kitchen set up  (Read 1325 times)

Offline Kolao

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Your kitchen set up
« on: July 15, 2018, 05:16:59 PM »
Safe to assume we like cooking? I do. My dream was to be a chef. Didn't work out that way but I now am a fairly adept amateur cook. I built my house from the kitchen out. It is the most important room to me.

What's your set up?

Pots: Lagostina + pressure cooker, slow cooker

Knives: Henckel

Bamboo cutting board

Electrolux oven with 3 gas burners, 1 electric burner and electric oven

4 meters of countertop: black mica-granite 'L' shaped

various other gadgets: cake mixer with detachable handle for hand mixing, fondue pot (I love fondues)

One thing I did like about Korea is the large selection of kitchen gadgets I used to find in E-Mart and that other large store haha....can't recall the name. I did find it strange though because I rarely met Koreans who were into baking, or cooking beyond their normal everyday fare.

I just baked a 2 tier chocolate cake with icing, from scratch, and a lemon zucchini loaf with lemon glaze crackle frosting.

I call it therapy!
When the wicked are confounded, and consigned to flames of woe, call me.

Online VanIslander

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Re: Your kitchen set up
« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2018, 06:42:05 PM »
Egg tray in fridge removed and space used to store cut-up carrots,  broccoli, green onion and cauliflower bites;

Spice rack stocked well but with no salt in the kitchen, opting for other ways to add seasoning;

Nuts on a rack: cashews and brazil nuts (available at emart) for snacks, walnuts for chopping cuz tastes better added to salads or sauces;

Several containers ready for Sunday veggie and fruit storage after quick washing and chopping prep;

A tea pot ready at all times on the stove to drop some Hibiscus or green tea or a few other selects;

Six ice trays loaded nightly to rock the next day's drinks, especially in summertime.

Online oglop

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Re: Your kitchen set up
« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2018, 06:46:58 PM »
i cannot understand most korean kitchens. even looking for fairly big villas recently, about 75% of the places had absolutely no kitchen space- literally just a cooking hob and a sink, right next to each other. how do people cook? do they not have any appliances? completely pointless.

Online VanIslander

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Re: Your kitchen set up
« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2018, 09:21:28 PM »
i cannot understand most korean kitchens. even looking for fairly big villas recently, about 75% of the places had absolutely no kitchen space- literally just a cooking hob and a sink, right next to each other. how do people cook? do they not have any appliances? completely pointless.
They got enough room for a rice cooker and a kimchi fridge. That's about it.

I was surprised at how small kitchens are here and especially the widespread LACK of a window in the kitchen!!

I do a lot of food prep on a table not the tiny counter.

Ventilation is what's lacking most.

Online JNM

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Re: Your kitchen set up
« Reply #4 on: July 15, 2018, 09:31:48 PM »
Good thread.

I like to cook, but I seldom have time these days.

My apartment was completely renovated just before I moved in, with all new appliances. It has a 4-burner range top, and a small convection oven, Miele dishwasher and a 4-door fridge/freezer.  They layout isn't bad, but still obviously not designed by a cook.  The sink is huge, but only one basin where 2 would be more useful; it's also about 10 cm too deep.

Lots of counter space, but my small appliances fill it up! Cheep "No Brand(tm)" microwave, coffee brewer, waffle iron, toaster, crock pot, rice cooker, 2 food processors, Bose Bluetooth speaker.

Pots: I have a set of Henckel pots from Shinsegae, 2 T-fal pans, and a no-name Teflon coated wok. Mrs. likes to bake, so lots of cake pans and cookie sheets. 3 glass baking dishes (with plastic lids)  (Wishlist: Chinese hammered wok)

Knives: 2 Asian style Tramontina chef knives (Costco) and a Henckel paring knife.

Dishes: American (plates!) style Corelle set (wife hates them - thinks they are for old people because both her grandmothers had them - but they are light, pack small, and are durable. She relented). We have a bunch of  domestic artisan ceramic serving dishes and desert plates.

What I miss: 2 apartments ago I had a full-sized North American stove (could cook a turkey in it!) and an outdoor area with a BBQ.

Overall, I'm happy with it.

Addendum:  Cutting boards - I am of the "buy cheep ones and replace frequently" school on that one. Expensive ones don't last any longer.  I might someday get another wooden one for bread, but that's more for show than for general use.


« Last Edit: July 15, 2018, 09:48:05 PM by JNM »

Online kobayashi

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Re: Your kitchen set up
« Reply #5 on: July 15, 2018, 09:48:28 PM »
i cannot understand most korean kitchens. even looking for fairly big villas recently, about 75% of the places had absolutely no kitchen space- literally just a cooking hob and a sink, right next to each other. how do people cook? do they not have any appliances? completely pointless.

koreans don't cook, they eat out or order delivery.

get yourself a table about waist-high with wheels on it. should be able to order off gmarket. mine was a lifesaver. used it mainly for food prep when i would cook, but when you're not using it for that you can wheel it away from the 'kitchen' area and put other stuff on it. i used to keep my kettle, coffee and tea on it. would just move those things off onto the coffee table when i wanted to use it for food prep.

Offline tylerthegloob

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Re: Your kitchen set up
« Reply #6 on: July 16, 2018, 07:36:11 AM »
I have:
-Two electric burners (sizes: small and less small)
-A sink that my medium sized pan cannot fit inside of
-1 square foot of table space

It's a good time.

Offline Nokcha

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Re: Your kitchen set up
« Reply #7 on: July 16, 2018, 07:39:06 AM »
I live in a small one room, and after removing the small cafe table and chairs and microwave, I bought 4 of the Ikea style shelves from E-mart. I use them for personal things and my Cuisinart counter top oven. I use one in the kitchen to store the dishware I brought from the states. All my cookware is calphalon, except a small fry pan I bought here. Knives henckel and assorted wooden and metal kitchen utensils. My new love are the silicone utensils! My space is very limited, so I opted for the appliances I would get the most use from: a crock pot and food processor. No coffee maker, toaster, mixer, rice maker....(though I did recently buy a yogurt maker after deciding making it in the crock pot wasn't as efficient, and I eat enough of it to warrant taking up some space.)

I do like to cook and have done a fair amount of baking. I place a cutting board across the top of my two burner stove when I need additional counter space.

Offline Chinguetti

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Re: Your kitchen set up
« Reply #8 on: July 16, 2018, 08:34:46 AM »
Many Koreans do food prep on the floor or on a fold-out table that they keep tucked away somewhere when not in use.

As for me, I've got a gas stove-top range (two burners), and about two-feet square counter space that I use for food prep because I also have a five-shelf storage unit where I keep all of my appliances (includes toaster, rice cooker, Wiswell oven, blender, and food processor) and most of my baking/cooking supplies (kept in plastic totes). I also have a mini metal rack where I keep all of my spices and oils.

I've got one cast-iron pan (pride and joy) and a bunch of miscellaneous cookware (including metal mixing bowls) in my bottom cabinet. Canned and boxed goods are kept in my upper cabinets, along with dinnerware dishes. Drying rack for dishes is screwed to the bottom of the cabinets right over my sink. I've got three drawers in my kitchen where I keep eating utensils in the top one, cooking utensils in the middle one, and the bottom one is used to keep miscellaneous items like trash bags, replacement dish pads, and tools.

I cook often, but I normally keep it to simple things that I can finish in less than 15 minutes, or that I don't have to babysit. If I cook something that doesn't fall into those two categories, it's normally for other people/guests.
« Last Edit: July 16, 2018, 08:43:57 AM by Chinguetti »

Offline kyndo

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Re: Your kitchen set up
« Reply #9 on: July 16, 2018, 09:23:20 AM »
    I have a fairly nice kitchen set-up: it's one of the things I really looked out for when choosing our new apartment, seeing as we both enjoy cooking.

    We have a sink large enough to hold all the dishes I own (uh, not that it's ever come to that...) in the centre of an "L" shaped counter. On one end of the L is a tiny stove we've been told is for grilling fish, but which I only ever use to make garlic bread and s'mores. Above that is a 4 element range, and under it is a dishwasher that, unfortunately, doesn't do a heck of a lot other than make strange noises and froth like a rabid dog. It also occasionally randomly turns itself on in the middle of the night. It may be possessed so might need to do something about it eventually.  Next to it is a mid-sized convection oven that works pretty well considering that I bought it for only around 240,000w six years ago. Next to that is where the crock pot sits (everybody should have one: can do so many awesome things with 'em!). The other side of the "L" is a decent amount of counter space dedicated for preparing food and stuff. And for dumping whatever happens to be in my pockets after getting home from school, of course.
     We have some nice ceramic dishes, some pots, woks, baking sheets, and pans from shinsegae that have seen a lot of hard use but stay surprisingly neat, and a whole bunch of cheap cutlery straight from Daiso (not allowed to buy anything better because I keep breaking and/or losing them one way or another).
     In the storage room next to the kitchen is our monster of a fridge, as well as a special rice dispenser cabinet ( :huh: ), but seeing as we don't eat much rice, I use it to store dog kibbles instead. There's also a kimchi fridge that we managed to somehow get stuck in deep-freeze mode, and is therefor now our freezer.

   It sounds like a horrible mess, but it all works, and looks very tidy.
« Last Edit: July 16, 2018, 09:41:22 AM by kyndo »

Offline Mr.DeMartino

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Re: Your kitchen set up
« Reply #10 on: July 16, 2018, 09:37:52 AM »
koreans don't cook, they eat out or order delivery.
Gee, I must have missed that when I go to private lessons and the parents are cooking dinner.

Also, isn't that true of many expats?

And if Koreans don't cook, how are supermarkets staying in business?

Online oglop

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Re: Your kitchen set up
« Reply #11 on: July 16, 2018, 09:43:13 AM »
koreans don't cook, they eat out or order delivery.
Gee, I must have missed that when I go to private lessons and the parents are cooking dinner.

Also, isn't that true of many expats?

And if Koreans don't cook, how are supermarkets staying in business?
yeah, it doesn't make sense.

small kitchens in korea are the worst. constantly trying to juggle space for appliances and somewhere to prep food. although i guess i do have more than average. toaster, kettle, microwave/oven, blender, coffee grinder...

Offline AvecPommesFrites

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Re: Your kitchen set up
« Reply #12 on: July 16, 2018, 10:34:17 AM »
My kitchen comes with a bed, a tv, a table, 1 chair and a shoe cupboard.
Can I refill your eggnog for you? Get you something to eat? Drive you out to the middle of nowhere and leave you for dead?

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Re: Your kitchen set up
« Reply #13 on: July 16, 2018, 10:42:46 AM »
My kitchen comes with a bed, a tv, a table, 1 chair and a shoe cupboard.

 :laugh:

No box tv?

edit:how I quoted you and still missed ‘tv’, I have no idea. My mind was racing to think of standard furnishings in a Korean one room.
« Last Edit: July 16, 2018, 09:30:41 PM by donovan »

Offline sojuadventurer

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Re: Your kitchen set up
« Reply #14 on: July 16, 2018, 11:22:30 AM »
Safe to assume we like cooking? I do. My dream was to be a chef. Didn't work out that way but I now am a fairly adept amateur cook. I built my house from the kitchen out. It is the most important room to me.

What's your set up?

Pots: Lagostina + pressure cooker, slow cooker

Knives: Henckel

Bamboo cutting board

Electrolux oven with 3 gas burners, 1 electric burner and electric oven

4 meters of countertop: black mica-granite 'L' shaped

various other gadgets: cake mixer with detachable handle for hand mixing, fondue pot (I love fondues)

One thing I did like about Korea is the large selection of kitchen gadgets I used to find in E-Mart and that other large store haha....can't recall the name. I did find it strange though because I rarely met Koreans who were into baking, or cooking beyond their normal everyday fare.

I just baked a 2 tier chocolate cake with icing, from scratch, and a lemon zucchini loaf with lemon glaze crackle frosting.

I call it therapy!

I hate you.

I say that in jest.

Mostly....  :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

Offline Kolao

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Re: Your kitchen set up
« Reply #15 on: July 16, 2018, 12:26:48 PM »
Agreeing with the crockpot (slow cooker) thing. I bought mine from GMarket and it was a saviour while I was in Korea. Load it up and head to work. Come home to an apartment that smells amazing.

Also, counter space, man. It's necessary.

The Chinese are moving in where I live big time and slapping up their huge monstrosities of apartment buildings. I went to check them out. They sell for $1500/sq. m. and the kitchens were so small they put the fridges out on the balcony.

Really????

And spices...the more the merrier
When the wicked are confounded, and consigned to flames of woe, call me.

Offline Kolao

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Re: Your kitchen set up
« Reply #16 on: July 16, 2018, 12:59:24 PM »
My sanctum sanctorum. Who needs a shrink's couch when you can cook!
When the wicked are confounded, and consigned to flames of woe, call me.

Offline kyndo

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Re: Your kitchen set up
« Reply #17 on: July 16, 2018, 01:21:21 PM »
My sanctum sanctorum. Who needs a shrink's couch when you can cook!

   That looks like a really nice kitchen. I'm impressed that you have photos of it at work.  :laugh:

   Also, is it just a trick of perspective, or are those counters really, really low?

Offline Kolao

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Re: Your kitchen set up
« Reply #18 on: July 16, 2018, 01:43:27 PM »
There's usually something going on in there :-) and the counters are standard height as per Alberta, Canada construction codes. As is everything else: electric outlets & switches, plumbing, water shutoff valves for example. Stuff you very rarely, if ever, see in a locals house (many of which are still made of wood and bamboo!).
When the wicked are confounded, and consigned to flames of woe, call me.

Offline kyndo

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Re: Your kitchen set up
« Reply #19 on: July 16, 2018, 01:51:31 PM »
Ah. Just odd perspective then.

There's something about stone walls and/or floors that I really like. Might just be nostalgia.

Can I ask why you have cozies wrapped around the handles of your fridge and icebox?