July 17, 2018, 07:28:49 PM


Author Topic: Question for those with F-visas  (Read 442 times)

Offline Sagi Keun

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Question for those with F-visas
« on: July 11, 2018, 09:43:40 PM »
Does all that easy F4 work dry up once you get past 35? 40?


Seems to me that F4's get the pick of the jobs but can you support a family on it?

What is the long-term financial feasibility of settling here if relying on a teaching income?
« Last Edit: July 12, 2018, 01:01:56 PM by Sagi Keun »

Online friendofcletus

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Re: Question for those married in Korea.
« Reply #1 on: July 12, 2018, 06:41:58 AM »
Transitioning to business ownership is what we are in the process of doing. Still a few years down the road, but it all goes well...creating, growing, and then selling a successful business (in our case a music and english school) is the plan.

Meanwhile, we are both working, and I have some private lessons that have let us live a comfortable life. We don't drive brand new cars, we don't live in the nicest apartment, and we don't spend copious amounts of money on clothing/booze/or other frivolities. We get to travel during vacation periods and once every year or two we head back to the US for a family visit.

It is true that an English teachers salary is not enough to cut it if you are the only income in the family. Both of you need to be earning. Also getting a Jeonse as soon as possible is worth it.

 

Offline Sagi Keun

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Re: Question for those married in Korea.
« Reply #2 on: July 12, 2018, 10:38:48 AM »
Transitioning to business ownership is what we are in the process of doing. Still a few years down the road, but it all goes well...creating, growing, and then selling a successful business (in our case a music and english school) is the plan.

Meanwhile, we are both working, and I have some private lessons that have let us live a comfortable life.

Sounds nice.

Although I assume that the private lessons and other work dries up once you hit 40? I mean, how sustainable is it, knowing the korean preference for youth.

I suppose in the longer term you either have to establish your own (successful) business here or leave.

Offline gogators!

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Re: Question for those married in Korea.
« Reply #3 on: July 13, 2018, 12:34:04 AM »
Transitioning to business ownership is what we are in the process of doing. Still a few years down the road, but it all goes well...creating, growing, and then selling a successful business (in our case a music and english school) is the plan.

Meanwhile, we are both working, and I have some private lessons that have let us live a comfortable life.

Sounds nice.

Although I assume that the private lessons and other work dries up once you hit 40? I mean, how sustainable is it, knowing the korean preference for youth.

I suppose in the longer term you either have to establish your own (successful) business here or leave.
L knew a guy in his 60s teaching privates almost exclusively.

Word of mouth is mostly what drives privates IME.