December 15, 2018, 03:04:39 AM


Author Topic: Advice to new teachers  (Read 4681 times)

Offline Chinguetti

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Re: Advice to new teachers
« Reply #60 on: July 11, 2018, 04:54:37 PM »
Yeah, and I feel like having my name up here keeps me honest. That's also why I briefly had my photo up as well.

So is there a story for why you chose to take it down?

I also don't like showing off :P

Joking aside, no not really. Felt a little nervous about it maybe, or got sick of seeing myself and thought others might feel the same.

Plus I thought of something waaay funnier~

Was hoping that someone sent you a lewd pic or something, but naaaaaw.

donovan

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Re: Advice to new teachers
« Reply #61 on: July 11, 2018, 07:03:14 PM »
Well there was this... :-[

Offline Mr.DeMartino

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Re: Advice to new teachers
« Reply #62 on: July 11, 2018, 10:51:46 PM »
What Martin has failed to understand repeatedly, is that he has tarred people with his massively wrong-tarring brush again. 

May I ask who have I tarred? I'm genuinely curious as any careful reading of my post would demonstrate that I cited multiple exceptions. Have you never stayed late to create or innovate and produce an exceptional, unique lesson? Is that not an indication of exceptional dedication to one's job?

Quote
There are those of us who have a good talent teaching here and a wealth of experience, who understand the levels of our students and what we are supposed to do, and can pluck an amazing lesson out of the air and make and apply it with the perfectly efficient amount of effort and resources and then with great skill teach it to students, with wins all around.

I will not argue with Dave here. I will simply ask the people of Waygook to decide which is more probable-

A) That this passage describes the overwhelming majority of English teachers, including new ones to which this thread is dedicated, and especially Dave himself

OR

B) That Dave has an exaggerated sense of himself and his own abilities.

My apologies if Dave is being satirical and is in fact, agreeing with me. It was hard to tell.
« Last Edit: July 11, 2018, 11:13:16 PM by Mr.DeMartino »

Online oglop

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Re: Advice to new teachers
« Reply #63 on: July 12, 2018, 09:31:02 AM »
if you need to spend hours on end to create one single lesson, you're doing it wrong

Offline williethewimp

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Re: Advice to new teachers
« Reply #64 on: July 12, 2018, 10:41:55 AM »
Some simple stuff from an old hand who is now writing about my time in Korea.

Long time ago a man by the name of Jim Croce gave me some advice and it went kind of like this:

You don't tug on Superman's cape

You don't spit in the wind

You don't pull the mask off the old Lone Ranger and...

...you don't mess around with Jim

Think it still applies today over 40 years and many counties and teaching positions later.

Give it some thought

Offline Mr.DeMartino

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Re: Advice to new teachers
« Reply #65 on: July 12, 2018, 10:42:42 AM »
if you need to spend hours on end to create one single lesson, you're doing it wrong
Run-of-the-mill lesson? Sure.

But if you never have the urge to create something special, try something new, or other similar impulses that involve going that extra mile, then that really says something about you as an employee, doesn't it?

Offline Mr.DeMartino

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Re: Advice to new teachers
« Reply #66 on: July 12, 2018, 11:11:09 AM »
But it's your understanding of the students, and it's the delivery and execution that is more important than the actual lesson.
Sure, it's an important part, quite likely more important.

That doesn't mean that lessons and materials and stuff isn't important as well. Two equally good teachers, give one better lessons and materials and they will have a better result.

donovan

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Re: Advice to new teachers
« Reply #67 on: July 12, 2018, 11:16:10 AM »
if you need to spend hours on end to create one single lesson, you're doing it wrong

I often spend hours on powerpoints, finding the right images and getting the animation just right,

but maybe I'm doing it wrong? :-[
« Last Edit: July 12, 2018, 11:18:03 AM by donovan »

Online oglop

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Re: Advice to new teachers
« Reply #68 on: July 12, 2018, 11:17:40 AM »
honestly, i feel like the lessons i have tried with over-the-top powerpoints, or intricate games, are the ones where students learn the least, or just end up flopping altogether

i appreciate the effort some people put into some ppts on this website, but they never go as well as i hoped for some reason

half the time i don't even use a powerpoint anyway. using flashcards or different coloured board markers are just as effective (or more, more often than not) for the presentation part of my lessons

edit: yeah, donovan, if you've got the time to do that, that's great. my point is spending hours on a lesson doesn't necessarily make you a better teacher (or mean it will be a better lesson), just as spending less time preparing for a class doesn't mean it will be less effective.

tl;dr not staying late after work at public school doesn't mean i'm not doing my job properly, it's just bad time management imo (with the billion hours free time you have a week)
« Last Edit: July 12, 2018, 11:24:42 AM by oglop »

donovan

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Re: Advice to new teachers
« Reply #69 on: July 12, 2018, 11:20:54 AM »
I agree that some of the powerpoints that look really gorgeous end up trying to steal the show. I spend a lot of time on my powerpoints, but as a resource that I can ping-pong off of and use to illustrate more vividly what I'm trying to say. I never let my PPts upstage me :afro:

donovan

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Re: Advice to new teachers
« Reply #70 on: July 12, 2018, 11:30:52 AM »

Online Mister Tim

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Re: Advice to new teachers
« Reply #71 on: July 12, 2018, 11:40:14 AM »
I think how one views the hypothetical employee staying late to finish a lesson plan depends on how highly one views the ability to use one's time efficiently.

In atmospheres were efficient use of time is rarely considered to be important, such as Korean workplaces, it can definitely be seen as a positive that an employee stays late to finish their work. It shows dedication and a drive to succeed. (Though I suspect if we had to be paid extra for any time we spent at school past the end of our workday, our bosses might suddenly care a bit more about time management, haha).

However, to someone who views efficient use of time as an important skill, that same employee might seems to have poor time management skills. If there are two employees who are creating products equal in quality, but one of them is able to create that product within the confines of their working hours, a manager might wonder why it's taking the other employee so much longer to get the job done.

I see where Marty is coming from here in saying that a person staying late to finish something shows motivation and a can-do attitude. Where we differ is the idea that if one has never done so, that is a sign of being worse at one's job. One person might show their motivation by staying late to create fun new materials, while another person might show their motivation by being able to manage their time efficiently enough to create fun new materials without needing to stay late.

In the end, the important thing is the quality of the end product. If someone stays late to make something exceptional, cool! If someone creates something exceptional without needing to stay late, cool!

« Last Edit: July 12, 2018, 11:42:38 AM by Mister Tim »

Offline gideonvasquez

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Re: Advice to new teachers
« Reply #72 on: July 12, 2018, 12:49:12 PM »
First is a preparation tip:

Get access to a paper cutter. Not scissors or the box cutters. A real guillotine cutter or the roller type. I don't know what it is exactly but kids really like straight and square edges on all the handouts. If you are like me and have to make enough handouts for 120~140 kids per grade that is a lot of cutting. It saves time and makes preparation for activities much easier. If your school doesn't have one somewhere then try and convince someone to use some of the English budget. If you have to, just bite the bullet and order a not crappy one for 30~50 thousand won yourself off gmarket.

This is more of a lifestyle tip:

When you are craving something from home google "how to make blah". It is actually really surprising how easy things I was really missing are to make. Lasagna noodles? Ravioli? Simple fresh egg pasta takes like 10 minutes of actual work to make and cut into a whole bunch of shapes. Can't find sour cream? It's literally just heavy cream and lemon or vinegar left out for a day at room temp. No fresh herbs you need for salsa? Grow them yourself. A decently sized Daiso will have small pots, soil, and the more common herb seeds (basil, parsley). You might need to order some rarer seeds like cilantro (coriander) online but it is worth it.

Offline Pennypie

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Re: Advice to new teachers
« Reply #73 on: July 12, 2018, 12:51:22 PM »
I don't really understand what staying late has to do with it though.

I get those bursts of inspiration all the time, and pour extra time into making something totally unique and special.
I just rarely get that inspiration at 4.35 during the week meaning I have to stay late.

 I'll get it in the morning then make extra time during the afternoon or on a Sunday.


Anyway this thread is interesting, lots of good advice here.  :azn:

Online oglop

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Re: Advice to new teachers
« Reply #74 on: July 12, 2018, 12:55:56 PM »
In the end, the important thing is the quality of the end product. If someone stays late to make something exceptional, cool! If someone creates something exceptional without needing to stay late, cool!
Aye good point. Things can be exceptional in different ways

^I like this guy's tips. Hummus is another example. Also, coupang's 로켓직구 has so much foreign products these days (로켓보송 is also amazing). I Iove coupang

Offline Mr.DeMartino

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Re: Advice to new teachers
« Reply #75 on: July 12, 2018, 01:12:37 PM »
One person might show their motivation by staying late to create fun new materials, while another person might show their motivation by being able to manage their time efficiently enough to create fun new materials without needing to stay late.

In the end, the important thing is the quality of the end product. If someone stays late to make something exceptional, cool! If someone creates something exceptional without needing to stay late, cool!
As I said, there are always exceptions, but I'm willing to bet that you take the "I'm always out of there at 5" crowd and then take people who say "Yeah there are a few times a year in which I'll work late because I'm trying something new or came up with an exciting idea" and the second group are far more likely to be better workers in many phases of their job.

Let's be real- yes some people are really efficient, but a lot of people tend to overestimate the quality of their own work. Also, a lot of people who say that are in fact, people turning out an average product. As I said, there are always exceptions.

I suspect if you look back at all the successful, creative, and influential people in history, you won't find a single one who was ALWAYS out of the office at 5 o'clock and never worked late turning an idea into a product.

I just rarely get that inspiration at 4.35 during the week meaning I have to stay late.
Like I said, it can be rare and I didn't say "always work late", in fact I've repeatedly said, we're talking about something you can count the number of times you've done it this year on one hand.

Online Mister Tim

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Re: Advice to new teachers
« Reply #76 on: July 12, 2018, 01:44:11 PM »
As I said, there are always exceptions, but I'm willing to bet that you take the "I'm always out of there at 5" crowd and then take people who say "Yeah there are a few times a year in which I'll work late because I'm trying something new or came up with an exciting idea" and the second group are far more likely to be better workers in many phases of their job.

I think you might be forgetting (or intentionally omitting) one group there: The people who come up with an idea close to closing time, and think "I'll work on this tomorrow, during the time I have set aside for working on lessons." There's no reason to automatically assume that people who are capable of getting done everything they need to get done in a timely manner are worse employees.

Obviously there are people who always want to cut out on time and never put in the extra effort, but I don't think we should assign that trait to everyone who is ready to go at the end of the work day. I think that's trying too hard to fit everyone into the same mold.

I do recognize that you've admitted there are exceptions to the concept you've put forward, but I think the exceptions are numerous enough that you don't really have a valid point overall.

Let's be real- yes some people are really efficient, but a lot of people tend to overestimate the quality of their own work. Also, a lot of people who say that are in fact, people turning out an average product.

By that same token, people who stay late to finish a project may well also be overestimating the quality of their own work. Staying late is not a foolproof indicator of quality work. It's only an indicator of more work.

I suspect if you look back at all the successful, creative, and influential people in history, you won't find a single one who was ALWAYS out of the office at 5 o'clock and never worked late turning an idea into a product.

And I suspect not being considered historically successful, creative, and influential doesn't have negative implications about one's abilities as an employee.

Again, I see where you're coming from and understand your reasoning behind it, I just think you might be placing too much importance on this one aspect of teaching.

Offline Mr.DeMartino

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Re: Advice to new teachers
« Reply #77 on: July 12, 2018, 03:18:51 PM »
And I suspect not being considered historically successful, creative, and influential doesn't have negative implications about one's abilities as an employee.

Again, I see where you're coming from and understand your reasoning behind it, I just think you might be placing too much importance on this one aspect of teaching.

I didn't place significant importance at all. A few people read it and got really riled up about it, especially those who started to project Korean office culture on what I was saying.

I do think that "I'm out at 5" types are far less likely to demonstrate as much dedication, concern for their students, quality of teaching, creative output, and so on than their counterparts who are willing to work longer to accomplish things, even without financial compensation. Again, not a certainty, but a probability.

Let's face it- amongst the people with the "Out at 5, no matter what" mentality, would it really shock you if at least 50% of them turned out to be utter goldbricks?

Offline AvecPommesFrites

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Re: Advice to new teachers
« Reply #78 on: July 12, 2018, 03:24:27 PM »
And I suspect not being considered historically successful, creative, and influential doesn't have negative implications about one's abilities as an employee.

Again, I see where you're coming from and understand your reasoning behind it, I just think you might be placing too much importance on this one aspect of teaching.

I didn't place significant importance at all. A few people read it and got really riled up about it, especially those who started to project Korean office culture on what I was saying.

I do think that "I'm out at 5" types are far less likely to demonstrate as much dedication, concern for their students, quality of teaching, creative output, and so on than their counterparts who are willing to work longer to accomplish things, even without financial compensation. Again, not a certainty, but a probability.

Let's face it- amongst the people with the "Out at 5, no matter what" mentality, would it really shock you if at least 50% of them turned out to be utter goldbricks?

If you can't work efficiently to a high standard at a public school gig without staying back till 7pm or whatever you say you must be wasting too much time writing essays on waygook.org all day.

You told me in PMs you weren't a teacher.

What is it exactly that you do for a living here? Enlighten me.

« Last Edit: July 12, 2018, 03:26:44 PM by AvecPommesFrites »
Can I refill your eggnog for you? Get you something to eat? Drive you out to the middle of nowhere and leave you for dead?

Offline bigfishlittlefish

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Re: Advice to new teachers
« Reply #79 on: July 12, 2018, 03:26:10 PM »

 "Out at 5, no matter what" mentality,

4.25 mate, leaving now. Enjoy your next few hours