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Author Topic: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese  (Read 2214 times)

Online zola

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Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #60 on: July 10, 2018, 10:00:36 AM »
Dude Korea has one of the most protectionist economies in the world. It's not like there isn't anything they can do about it. They can lower their tariffs and put in limits on middlemen mark ups. It's not rocket science.

Canada and the U.S. are currently in a flap over dairy tariffs. Obviously some protectionism is involved, yet in both countries, dairy products are relatively cheaper.

Dude, where is all this land that Korea can grow crops? Protectionism or not, it still has to be flown in by airplane or shipped across the Pacific ocean by boat, a journey that takes between 2-3 weeks. That means more labor costs, more refrigeration costs, more fuel costs, etc.

I don't think you quite grasp the logistical and agricultural differences.
Back home during the winter we get Californian stone fruit and grapes as well as Chilean and Peruvian grapes. They are priced at about half of what you would pay in Korea. The difference, an almost complete absence of protectionist tarrifs and a much more efficient infrastructure of farmer to market.

You say some bloat.  That is the understatement of the century. There are often 2 or 3 middlemen between producer and market. Each tacking on their cut. We have become friendly with a guy outside our city who grows leafy greens like kale and spinich. We purchase at half the supermarket price. He was explaining the Byzantine process of selling through retailers and the fractions of profits he used to make. Shockingly bad. But the provincial government drips subsidies to him that keep his head just above water. In the last year he's been selling directly to restaurants and he said it's his most successful year. But he has been threatened indirectly by his farm suppliers that if he doesn't go through their supply chains they are going to hurt him on other costs e.g fertilizer, other farming supplies. Because what do yoy know its the same giant company behind both sides of the production line.

You know a tiny part of the mess that is farming in this country. Yes arable land is obviously an issue but in 2018 means less then it needs to. It is price gouging and massively inefficient supply chain. Probably explains that 75% of the shit you buy in shops is half rotten.
Kpip! - Martin 2018

Online Mister Tim

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Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #61 on: July 10, 2018, 10:12:50 AM »
I disagree. Sour cream on most Mexican dishes is atrocious and completely unnecessary.

Queso blanco/fresco, then.

...And don't you dare tell me those ruin Mexican dishes, too.

Offline Mr.DeMartino

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Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #62 on: July 10, 2018, 10:21:23 AM »
I disagree. Sour cream on most Mexican dishes is atrocious and completely unnecessary.

Queso blanco/fresco, then.

...And don't you dare tell me those ruin Mexican dishes, too.

Queso blanco is divine. Sour cream is atrocious on spicy Mexican food. It's only good on what amounts to junk tex-mex food like nachos or Mexican pizza.