September 25, 2018, 02:40:58 PM


Author Topic: Unnecessary Korean jobs  (Read 1577 times)

Online Savant

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Re: Unnecessary Korean jobs
« Reply #20 on: May 09, 2018, 11:26:55 AM »
Haha. Gotta love DeMartino. He can turn a spin on anything into a pro Korea stance.  :laugh:

Here's your 0 hours contract that comes with no guarantee of work and without all the benefits of a fixed hours contract. You will be paid minimum wage.  Please be ready to work whenever I request or you will be let go and replaced by another 47 year old woman who is desperate to fill the lack of income void in her family's finances since being fired by the bank for being too old. Remember to badger the customers until they purchase a 700% marked up box set of tooth paste or spam.

I'd like to add the traffic wardens in my city who roam the streets doing anything other than policing traffic.

Unnecessary Korean jobs - Steels' constant defending of all things Han.

Offline hangook77

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Re: Unnecessary Korean jobs
« Reply #21 on: May 09, 2018, 01:05:09 PM »
A Korean-American friend of mine told me that some of the “traffic directors” are cabbies working off fines.

That's indeed some of it, which I think is actually a pretty good idea when it comes to rehabilitation/alternative punishment for lower-income individuals and is rather progressive.

As for the Hi-Mart greeters, no they aren't subsidized by the government. There is a difference between how corporations and companies are regarded here vs. back home. There is a much stronger belief that corporations are part of the social contract. They have an obligation towards welfare and society and that is why they are also granted tremendous power. That is why these companies hire these "pointless" workers.

There is also a significant difference in regard to age and work (although not THAT big). Presently, we view old age as retirement and in many cases this has led to little more than shoving people into senior centers and waiting for them to die while sitting around watching TV. The relative ableness and activity of the elderly in Korea is a good thing and this is also shown in people working. Time and time again it has been demonstrated that a sense of purpose and regular work has tremendous health benefits, both mental and physical, for the elderly. It is also important for their sense of self-respect that they can still produce and contribute.

So maybe you think it's "dumb" and "pointless", but I disagree. I think it's one of the things they really have gotten right here. Now, there are plenty of exceptions and flaws within this, but the overall philosophy is good.

Many elderly work here because they don't have a pension either.  Government gives them max 200,000 if they have no family or anyone to support them.  It might be in the process of being raised to 300,000.  But, I am not sure.  Thought I heard that.  You got to pay into the pension for at least 10 years (or 120 months) Korean of foreigner to get it when you're old. 

Online Aristocrat

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Re: Unnecessary Korean jobs
« Reply #22 on: May 09, 2018, 02:27:41 PM »
A Korean-American friend of mine told me that some of the “traffic directors” are cabbies working off fines.

That's indeed some of it, which I think is actually a pretty good idea when it comes to rehabilitation/alternative punishment for lower-income individuals and is rather progressive.

As for the Hi-Mart greeters, no they aren't subsidized by the government. There is a difference between how corporations and companies are regarded here vs. back home. There is a much stronger belief that corporations are part of the social contract. They have an obligation towards welfare and society and that is why they are also granted tremendous power. That is why these companies hire these "pointless" workers.

There is also a significant difference in regard to age and work (although not THAT big). Presently, we view old age as retirement and in many cases this has led to little more than shoving people into senior centers and waiting for them to die while sitting around watching TV. The relative ableness and activity of the elderly in Korea is a good thing and this is also shown in people working. Time and time again it has been demonstrated that a sense of purpose and regular work has tremendous health benefits, both mental and physical, for the elderly. It is also important for their sense of self-respect that they can still produce and contribute.

So maybe you think it's "dumb" and "pointless", but I disagree. I think it's one of the things they really have gotten right here. Now, there are plenty of exceptions and flaws within this, but the overall philosophy is good.

Many elderly work here because they don't have a pension either.  Government gives them max 200,000 if they have no family or anyone to support them.  It might be in the process of being raised to 300,000.  But, I am not sure.  Thought I heard that.  You got to pay into the pension for at least 10 years (or 120 months) Korean of foreigner to get it when you're old.

Kind of

People forget that Korea is very new to the economic model as well as the culture of Capitalism and Democracy, particularly independence and individualism.

Westerners are expected to have retirement savings to look after themselves when they're too old to work.
Koreans are expected to raise successful children so they can rely on them (some, particularly Chinese boys, are spoilt
rotten with the belief that they'll care for their parents when they're old).
Westerners are expected to move out ASAP, Asians are expected to stay at home till they get married.
Nurses are the caregivers in western hospitals, relatives are the caregivers in Asian ones.

Korea's tradition is VERY much family orientated. You don't throw that away just because Uncle Sam helped you build a Democracy.

... So, old people just don't have the money to look after themselves since hundreds of years of tradition taught them to leave it to their kids.

Offline ESLTurtle

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Re: Unnecessary Korean jobs
« Reply #23 on: May 09, 2018, 02:34:00 PM »
A Korean-American friend of mine told me that some of the “traffic directors” are cabbies working off fines.

That's indeed some of it, which I think is actually a pretty good idea when it comes to rehabilitation/alternative punishment for lower-income individuals and is rather progressive.

As for the Hi-Mart greeters, no they aren't subsidized by the government. There is a difference between how corporations and companies are regarded here vs. back home. There is a much stronger belief that corporations are part of the social contract. They have an obligation towards welfare and society and that is why they are also granted tremendous power. That is why these companies hire these "pointless" workers.

There is also a significant difference in regard to age and work (although not THAT big). Presently, we view old age as retirement and in many cases this has led to little more than shoving people into senior centers and waiting for them to die while sitting around watching TV. The relative ableness and activity of the elderly in Korea is a good thing and this is also shown in people working. Time and time again it has been demonstrated that a sense of purpose and regular work has tremendous health benefits, both mental and physical, for the elderly. It is also important for their sense of self-respect that they can still produce and contribute.

So maybe you think it's "dumb" and "pointless", but I disagree. I think it's one of the things they really have gotten right here. Now, there are plenty of exceptions and flaws within this, but the overall philosophy is good.

Many elderly work here because they don't have a pension either.  Government gives them max 200,000 if they have no family or anyone to support them.  It might be in the process of being raised to 300,000.  But, I am not sure.  Thought I heard that.  You got to pay into the pension for at least 10 years (or 120 months) Korean of foreigner to get it when you're old.

Kind of

People forget that Korea is very new to the economic model as well as the culture of Capitalism and Democracy, particularly independence and individualism.

Westerners are expected to have retirement savings to look after themselves when they're too old to work.
Koreans are expected to raise successful children so they can rely on them (some, particularly Chinese boys, are spoilt
rotten with the belief that they'll care for their parents when they're old).
Westerners are expected to move out ASAP, Asians are expected to stay at home till they get married.
Nurses are the caregivers in western hospitals, relatives are the caregivers in Asian ones.

Korea's tradition is VERY much family orientated. You don't throw that away just because Uncle Sam helped you build a Democracy.

... So, old people just don't have the money to look after themselves since hundreds of years of tradition taught them to leave it to their kids.

You definitely have a point there. I am interested to see how the government will tackle this issue, as a lot of youth these days are choosing to work, travel, and move abroad instead of taking care of their parents/grandparents. Part-time Korean teachers at hagwons are the perfect example. They make trash money while living with mommy and daddy while hoping to meet Mr. Lee Min Ho or something or read books and be weird and single.  :rolleyes: This is all due to the difficult cost of living, competition within the job market, and judging someone based on their looks and where they graduated from as opposed to their beliefs with the company's philosophy and their personality/experience.  :undecided: