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Author Topic: 50 years since the death of Dr. King  (Read 1741 times)

Offline Foreverparadise

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50 years since the death of Dr. King
« on: April 05, 2018, 03:58:18 AM »

Where I am it is April 4th. 50 years since the assassination of Martin Luther King.

I am in Northern Ontario in Canada and I didn't have to go to work today because of
a terrible snow storm. That is why I am glad I got this day off to commemorate the
life and work of Martin Luther King following the past 50 years of his death on this
day.

The justice that Martin Luther King stood for was not only for the USA, but anywhere
and everywhere. As Martin Luther king once said, "Injustice anywhere is a threat to
justice everywhere.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oehry1JC9Rk


Offline CDW

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Re: 50 years since the death of Dr. King
« Reply #1 on: April 05, 2018, 07:28:31 AM »
Some interesting and truly thought provoking reading:

"Martin Luther King: 'We Can’t Keep On Blaming the White Man'
Fifty years after his death, many pay lip service to his ideals, but far too few are following his example....

"It almost goes without saying that the leading civil-rights organizations today can no longer count people of that caliber in their ranks. Which may be the clearest indication yet that the movement is over and that the right side prevailed. If black Americans were still faced with legitimate threats to civil rights—such as legal discrimination or voter disenfranchisement—we would see true successors to the King-era luminaries step forward, not the pretenders in place today who have turned a movement into an industry, if not a racket.

"Racial gaps that were steadily narrowing in the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s would expand in the 1970s, ’80s and ’90s, which suggests that the disparities that continue today aren’t being driven by racism, notwithstanding claims to the contrary from liberals and their allies in the media. It also suggests that attitudes toward marriage, education, work and the rule of law play a much larger role than the left wants to acknowledge. More marches won’t address out-of-wedlock childbearing. More sit-ins won’t lower black crime rates or narrow the school achievement gap.

"Even electing and appointing more black officials, which has been a major priority for civil-rights leaders over the past half-century, can’t compensate for these cultural deficiencies. Black mayors, police chiefs and school superintendents have been commonplace since the 1970s, including in major cities with large black populations. Racially gerrymandered voting districts have ensured the election of blacks to Congress. Even the election of a black president—twice—failed to close the divide in many key measures. Black-white differences in poverty, homeownership and incomes all grew wider under President Obama.

"Discussion of antisocial behavior in poor black communities, let alone the possibility that it plays a significant role in racial inequality, has become another casualty of the post-’60s era. King and other black leaders at the time spoke openly about the need for more-responsible behavior in poor black communities....

"King’s successors mostly ignore this advice, preferring instead to keep the onus on whites. Where King tried to instill in young people the importance of personal responsibility and self-determination notwithstanding racial barriers, his counterparts today spend more time making excuses for counterproductive behavior and dismissing criticism of it as racist. Activists who long ago abandoned King’s colorblind standard, which was the basis for the landmark civil-rights laws enacted in the 1960s, tell black youths today that they are victims, first and foremost.

"A generation of blacks who have more opportunity than any previous generation are being taught that America offers them little more than trigger-happy cops, bigoted teachers and biased employers. It’s not only incorrect, but as King and a previous generation of black leaders understood, it’s also unhelpful.

"Black activists and liberal politicians stress racism because it serves their own interests, not because it serves the interests of the black underclass. But neglecting or playing down the role that blacks must play in addressing racial disparities can only exacerbate them. Fifty years after King’s death, plenty of people are paying him lip service. Far too few are following his example."
https://www.wsj.com/articles/martin-luther-king-we-cant-keep-on-blaming-the-white-man-1522792580

Offline waygo0k

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Re: 50 years since the death of Dr. King
« Reply #2 on: April 05, 2018, 08:58:55 AM »
Some interesting and truly thought provoking reading:

"Martin Luther King: 'We Can’t Keep On Blaming the White Man'
Fifty years after his death, many pay lip service to his ideals, but far too few are following his example....

"It almost goes without saying that the leading civil-rights organizations today can no longer count people of that caliber in their ranks. Which may be the clearest indication yet that the movement is over and that the right side prevailed. If black Americans were still faced with legitimate threats to civil rights—such as legal discrimination or voter disenfranchisement—we would see true successors to the King-era luminaries step forward, not the pretenders in place today who have turned a movement into an industry, if not a racket.

"Racial gaps that were steadily narrowing in the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s would expand in the 1970s, ’80s and ’90s, which suggests that the disparities that continue today aren’t being driven by racism, notwithstanding claims to the contrary from liberals and their allies in the media. It also suggests that attitudes toward marriage, education, work and the rule of law play a much larger role than the left wants to acknowledge. More marches won’t address out-of-wedlock childbearing. More sit-ins won’t lower black crime rates or narrow the school achievement gap.

"Even electing and appointing more black officials, which has been a major priority for civil-rights leaders over the past half-century, can’t compensate for these cultural deficiencies. Black mayors, police chiefs and school superintendents have been commonplace since the 1970s, including in major cities with large black populations. Racially gerrymandered voting districts have ensured the election of blacks to Congress. Even the election of a black president—twice—failed to close the divide in many key measures. Black-white differences in poverty, homeownership and incomes all grew wider under President Obama.

"Discussion of antisocial behavior in poor black communities, let alone the possibility that it plays a significant role in racial inequality, has become another casualty of the post-’60s era. King and other black leaders at the time spoke openly about the need for more-responsible behavior in poor black communities....

"King’s successors mostly ignore this advice, preferring instead to keep the onus on whites. Where King tried to instill in young people the importance of personal responsibility and self-determination notwithstanding racial barriers, his counterparts today spend more time making excuses for counterproductive behavior and dismissing criticism of it as racist. Activists who long ago abandoned King’s colorblind standard, which was the basis for the landmark civil-rights laws enacted in the 1960s, tell black youths today that they are victims, first and foremost.

"A generation of blacks who have more opportunity than any previous generation are being taught that America offers them little more than trigger-happy cops, bigoted teachers and biased employers. It’s not only incorrect, but as King and a previous generation of black leaders understood, it’s also unhelpful.

"Black activists and liberal politicians stress racism because it serves their own interests, not because it serves the interests of the black underclass. But neglecting or playing down the role that blacks must play in addressing racial disparities can only exacerbate them. Fifty years after King’s death, plenty of people are paying him lip service. Far too few are following his example."
https://www.wsj.com/articles/martin-luther-king-we-cant-keep-on-blaming-the-white-man-1522792580

How someone can post this with a straight  face (and zero evidence)...is completely baffling, even though it shouldn't be given who the OP is.

But then again, when did reality or evidence-backed opinions matter to people who think like this.

Offline hangook77

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Re: 50 years since the death of Dr. King
« Reply #3 on: April 18, 2018, 12:18:45 PM »
His dream of a color blind society has still not come to pass.  People talk about color now more than ever in America.  I truly wish others would judge as I do based on a persons behavior or color.  But polarizing and dividing people seems to be the best politically for some people to keep voting blocks together.  The party of segregation pits people against each other today to whip up hatred. 

Offline Foreverparadise

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Re: 50 years since the death of Dr. King
« Reply #4 on: May 09, 2018, 11:20:23 PM »
The issue is, some people will never learn from the history of their ancestors past sins.
The USA is still a large bastion for more than 800 white supremacist terrorist groups.
As long as they exist, race will always be a factor in may walks of American life.

Offline gogators!

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Re: 50 years since the death of Dr. King
« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2018, 08:20:48 AM »
His dream of a color blind society has still not come to pass.  People talk about color now more than ever in America.  I truly wish others would judge as I do based on a persons behavior or color.  But polarizing and dividing people seems to be the best politically for some people to keep voting blocks together.  The party of segregation pits people against each other today to whip up hatred.
That's the repugnican's southern strategy that under trump they have returned to with a vengeance.

Offline Mr.DeMartino

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Re: 50 years since the death of Dr. King
« Reply #6 on: May 10, 2018, 08:58:44 AM »
His dream of a color blind society has still not come to pass.  People talk about color now more than ever in America.  I truly wish others would judge as I do based on a persons behavior or color.  But polarizing and dividing people seems to be the best politically for some people to keep voting blocks together.  The party of segregation pits people against each other today to whip up hatred.
That's the repugnican's southern strategy that under trump they have returned to with a vengeance.

I see two parties: One party says it stands for all Americans and doesn't look at race. It has produced record low levels of unemployment for whites and minorities. People think minorities inside this group are subjects, but ask them and they're havng a blast.

The other party divides people into hierarchies of victimhood and privilige, 50 different genders, and has everyone on a knife's edge and defined by tribe. Everyone seems angry and miserable.

Just look at the tone of gogators posts- froth, foam, bile, and anger.

Come over to the MAGA side and enjoy the dawning of a new golden age and celebrate the good things getting done.

Offline gogators!

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Re: 50 years since the death of Dr. King
« Reply #7 on: May 11, 2018, 03:27:40 AM »
His dream of a color blind society has still not come to pass.  People talk about color now more than ever in America.  I truly wish others would judge as I do based on a persons behavior or color.  But polarizing and dividing people seems to be the best politically for some people to keep voting blocks together.  The party of segregation pits people against each other today to whip up hatred.
That's the repugnican's southern strategy that under trump they have returned to with a vengeance.

I see two parties: One party says it stands for all Americans and doesn't look at race. It has produced record low levels of unemployment for whites and minorities. People think minorities inside this group are subjects, but ask them and they're havng a blast.

The other party divides people into hierarchies of victimhood and privilige, 50 different genders, and has everyone on a knife's edge and defined by tribe. Everyone seems angry and miserable.

Just look at the tone of gogators posts- froth, foam, bile, and anger.

Come over to the MAGA side and enjoy the dawning of a new golden age and celebrate the good things getting done.
What good things?

RE the unemployment numbers, according to trumpy when he was campaigning they were fake. Now they're real?

RE color, people need to talk about it for progress to be made. Hate crimes are up for the second straight year. I don't think minorities are having a "blast."

I guess for folks like you, lying and pretending is a "blast." Did you learn that in the US while slinging pizzas and manning a convenience store register or while in SK sucking up to make won?

Offline MoneyMike

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Re: 50 years since the death of Dr. King
« Reply #8 on: May 11, 2018, 12:15:14 PM »
I'm not American but I'll toss my two cents in anyways, so take it for what it's worth.

In the 1960's black people in America were more likely to own a home, labor participation was higher, high school graduation rates were higher, out of wedlock birth rates were half what they are today. Things have gotten worse by a lot of metrics for black people in America.

I don't really know how to account for this. Surely nobody is arguing that America now is MORE racist than it was in the 60's? Jeez, back then even dating someone of a different race was seen as wrong.



Offline Mr.DeMartino

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Re: 50 years since the death of Dr. King
« Reply #9 on: May 11, 2018, 12:50:38 PM »
RE the unemployment numbers, according to trumpy when he was campaigning they were fake. Now they're real?
So do you agree with Trump or not? Are the numbers real or not?

Obviously you have to look at them and see what kind of jobs they are.

Quote
RE color, people need to talk about it for progress to be made. Hate crimes are up for the second straight year.

There were like 6,000 hate crimes last year, resulting in 9 murders.

You have a greater chance of getting struck by lightning. Although if lightning deaths rise, that's probably Trump's fault too.  :rolleyes:

Getting a bit desperate aren't we?

Offline ESLTurtle

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Re: 50 years since the death of Dr. King
« Reply #10 on: May 11, 2018, 01:11:48 PM »
E pluribus unum.  8)

Offline kyndo

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Re: 50 years since the death of Dr. King
« Reply #11 on: May 11, 2018, 01:30:35 PM »
You have a greater chance of getting struck by lightning. Although if lightning deaths rise, that's probably Trump's fault too.  :rolleyes:
Well, under Mr. Trump's admin, the States has refused to join the Kyoto Protocol, and has done very little about curbing its carbon emissions. Anthropomorphically driven climate change will lead to a much higher incidence of storms which includes -- you guessed it! -- lightning.
 So, in a round-about way, the POTUS *is* actually responsible for the inevitable increase in lightning strike fatalities.  :smiley:
« Last Edit: May 11, 2018, 01:40:57 PM by kyndo »

Online eggieguffer

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Re: 50 years since the death of Dr. King
« Reply #12 on: May 11, 2018, 01:31:17 PM »
Quote
In the 1960's black people in America were more likely to own a home, labor participation was higher, high school graduation rates were higher, out of wedlock birth rates were half what they are today. Things have gotten worse by a lot of metrics for black people in America.I don't really know how to account for this.

The state started to sponsor women to have children out of wedlock and there was no reason for guys to hang around. Kids from single parent families are less likely to succeed at life.   

Offline tylerthegloob

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Re: 50 years since the death of Dr. King
« Reply #13 on: May 11, 2018, 02:24:35 PM »
Quote
In the 1960's black people in America were more likely to own a home, labor participation was higher, high school graduation rates were higher, out of wedlock birth rates were half what they are today. Things have gotten worse by a lot of metrics for black people in America.I don't really know how to account for this.

The state started to sponsor women to have children out of wedlock and there was no reason for guys to hang around. Kids from single parent families are less likely to succeed at life.

http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2014/07/18/chart-of-the-week-the-black-white-gap-in-incarceration-rates/

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2016/02/26/america-has-locked-up-so-many-black-people-it-has-warped-our-sense-of-reality/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.0c75ad9a94f1

yes, whatever could it be? it MUST be those pesky welfare programs that support single mothers...

Online eggieguffer

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Re: 50 years since the death of Dr. King
« Reply #14 on: May 11, 2018, 02:39:08 PM »
Quote
In the 1960's black people in America were more likely to own a home, labor participation was higher, high school graduation rates were higher, out of wedlock birth rates were half what they are today. Things have gotten worse by a lot of metrics for black people in America.I don't really know how to account for this.

The state started to sponsor women to have children out of wedlock and there was no reason for guys to hang around. Kids from single parent families are less likely to succeed at life.

http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2014/07/18/chart-of-the-week-the-black-white-gap-in-incarceration-rates/

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2016/02/26/america-has-locked-up-so-many-black-people-it-has-warped-our-sense-of-reality/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.0c75ad9a94f1

yes, whatever could it be? it MUST be those pesky welfare programs that support single mothers...

That was kind of my point. Look up the stats for kids from single parents in jail

Offline tylerthegloob

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Re: 50 years since the death of Dr. King
« Reply #15 on: May 11, 2018, 02:46:08 PM »
Quote
In the 1960's black people in America were more likely to own a home, labor participation was higher, high school graduation rates were higher, out of wedlock birth rates were half what they are today. Things have gotten worse by a lot of metrics for black people in America.I don't really know how to account for this.

The state started to sponsor women to have children out of wedlock and there was no reason for guys to hang around. Kids from single parent families are less likely to succeed at life.

http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2014/07/18/chart-of-the-week-the-black-white-gap-in-incarceration-rates/

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2016/02/26/america-has-locked-up-so-many-black-people-it-has-warped-our-sense-of-reality/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.0c75ad9a94f1

yes, whatever could it be? it MUST be those pesky welfare programs that support single mothers...

That was kind of my point. Look up the stats for kids from single parents in jail

why would it be "the state started to sponsor women having children out of wedlock" instead of "the state started locking people up at ridiculous rates"?

and saying "there was no reason for guys to hang around" seems super misleading when you acknowledge that many of them were in jail

Online eggieguffer

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Re: 50 years since the death of Dr. King
« Reply #16 on: May 11, 2018, 02:47:23 PM »
Quote
In the 1960's black people in America were more likely to own a home, labor participation was higher, high school graduation rates were higher, out of wedlock birth rates were half what they are today. Things have gotten worse by a lot of metrics for black people in America.I don't really know how to account for this.

The state started to sponsor women to have children out of wedlock and there was no reason for guys to hang around. Kids from single parent families are less likely to succeed at life.

http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2014/07/18/chart-of-the-week-the-black-white-gap-in-incarceration-rates/

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2016/02/26/america-has-locked-up-so-many-black-people-it-has-warped-our-sense-of-reality/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.0c75ad9a94f1

yes, whatever could it be? it MUST be those pesky welfare programs that support single mothers...

That was kind of my point. Look up the stats for kids from single parents in jail

why would it be "the state started to sponsor women having children out of wedlock" instead of "the state started locking people up at ridiculous rates"?

I assume they locked these people up for a reason so by that stage the problem already existed.

Offline tylerthegloob

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Re: 50 years since the death of Dr. King
« Reply #17 on: May 11, 2018, 02:58:44 PM »

I assume they locked these people up for a reason so by that stage the problem already existed.

well i guess that's where we differ

Offline gogators!

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Re: 50 years since the death of Dr. King
« Reply #18 on: May 18, 2018, 11:18:09 PM »
Quote
In the 1960's black people in America were more likely to own a home, labor participation was higher, high school graduation rates were higher, out of wedlock birth rates were half what they are today. Things have gotten worse by a lot of metrics for black people in America.I don't really know how to account for this.

The state started to sponsor women to have children out of wedlock and there was no reason for guys to hang around. Kids from single parent families are less likely to succeed at life.

http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2014/07/18/chart-of-the-week-the-black-white-gap-in-incarceration-rates/

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2016/02/26/america-has-locked-up-so-many-black-people-it-has-warped-our-sense-of-reality/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.0c75ad9a94f1

yes, whatever could it be? it MUST be those pesky welfare programs that support single mothers...

That was kind of my point. Look up the stats for kids from single parents in jail

why would it be "the state started to sponsor women having children out of wedlock" instead of "the state started locking people up at ridiculous rates"?

I assume they locked these people up for a reason so by that stage the problem already existed.
Studies show almost 120,000 in jail are innocent.

Quote
A record-breaking number of people were exonerated in 2015 — freed after serving time in American prisons for crimes they did not commit.

In all, 149 people spent an average of 15 years in prison before being cleared last year, according to a new report (.pdf) out Wednesday from the National Registry of Exonerations, a project at the University of Michigan Law School.

The convictions ranged from lower level offenses, such as 47 drug crimes, to major felonies, including 54 murder convictions that were overturned. Five of the convicts were awaiting execution, and were saved last year when courts ruled they didn't belong in the prison in the first place.


Online eggieguffer

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Re: 50 years since the death of Dr. King
« Reply #19 on: May 19, 2018, 04:51:43 AM »
Everyone in prison's innocent, didn't you know?