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Author Topic: I'm at a loss everyday of what to do - 12 after school classes with no tech  (Read 876 times)

Offline tryingtogettokorea

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Everyday is a struggle as I try to plan lessons for after school. I have 12 per week along with my 10 regular classes which are much easier since I teach from the book and so I already have a bunch of material to work from (also the regular classes are in their classrooms so I can use the computer/tv which the books need in order to conduct the lesson). Everyday I stressfully plan during my deskwarming time (times between classes) and with all that time I only come up with mediocre, boring things. It's only the first week and I don't know if I can keep this up. Any suggestions of what to do everyday? I need like actual suggestions. Like activities, lesson plans, etc. I've been searching waygook and google to try to find things to do in 40 and 80 minutes that would vary and not get boring since I cant do the same thing everyday but haven't found anything I could effectively adapt.

Offline magicshoemonkey

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What age group/level are you teaching? Elementary? Middle?

What focus do they need? Phonics? Basic vocab?
Are you allowed to do games or does it need to be more instructional?

Offline awalsh361992

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If they are young and you haven't been set a theme you could try doing games from around the world? Seems boring but means you could teach them traditional games from around the world, with little prep? For example-whats the time Mr wolf. I am not doing this, but the previous teacher did... then when it was going well she asked for board games.

Not sure if this is helpful, but it worked well for her last year.

Good luck!

Offline Datasapien

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If you feel overwhelmed, consider finding another textbook to use and photocopy for your afternoon classes. You can find some good debate / speaking / reading comprehension textbooks that cr*p all over the textbooks we have to use in our typical classes. You can buy online, or try your local bookshops.
A noble spirit embiggens the smallest man.

Offline tryingtogettokorea

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If you feel overwhelmed, consider finding another textbook to use and photocopy for your afternoon classes. You can find some good debate / speaking / reading comprehension textbooks that cr*p all over the textbooks we have to use in our typical classes. You can buy online, or try your local bookshops.
They're elementary schoolers. I don't think that'll work, but thanks.

Offline tryingtogettokorea

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What age group/level are you teaching? Elementary? Middle?

What focus do they need? Phonics? Basic vocab?
Are you allowed to do games or does it need to be more instructional?

Elementary Schoolers. 3-6
Classes by grade not level.
Mixed level.
For example.
5th grade is 3 students (smallest class yet they're a handful)
One student doesn't know her ABCs at all. One student is quite advanced and one student is in the middle.

Offline tryingtogettokorea

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If they are young and you haven't been set a theme you could try doing games from around the world? Seems boring but means you could teach them traditional games from around the world, with little prep? For example-whats the time Mr wolf. I am not doing this, but the previous teacher did... then when it was going well she asked for board games.

Not sure if this is helpful, but it worked well for her last year.

Good luck!

Last semester when I taught K-6 I tried things like that (simon says) and they just couldn't understand at all

now because of the law i teach 3-6 but I don't think they'd want to play those games especially everyday.
wouldn't that get boring?

Offline tanishatempest

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For low tech games, I use minute to win it games. I just adjust them so they are forced to use english. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1uj7Zo3fjt8 For example, any games involving cups, I tape the new terms on them to force them to say it before doing the action. The other person's idea of doing different games from around the world could be cool and you could even spin it off to doing different dances from around the world as well.

Offline Pennypie

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Can I ask why you have no tech?

I'm just wondering if you've tried asking for a room with a computer? They might just be assuming you don't need one. A Korean teacher couldn't even do what they are asking you to do. They might also have a budget.

I think sometimes we as teachers put up with stuff because we don't want to have an awkward conversation, but in this case you really need it. I'm sure you can find stuff to do but it'll be stressful and the students are missing out on lessons that you could teach if only you had a computer!

Offline theman3285

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If you feel overwhelmed, consider finding another textbook to use and photocopy for your afternoon classes.
This is honestly your best bet. I taught after-school at elementary back in 2016, but luckily my co-T was around to show me the ropes. In our case, these classes became phonics textbook time. Each lesson would focus on another letter or letter combination (eg. 'ph... for phone, photo, etc.'). Your textbook might include a little story for each sound. Write that on the board and drill it. Get them to stand up and take turns reading individually. Basically use the same format for every class but change the variables. And of course, you can throw in a game/review lesson every now and then.

I definitely wouldn't go for ultra entertaining, original lesson plans, if I were you. You'll burn out in no time.
« Last Edit: March 14, 2018, 11:02:06 AM by theman3285 »

Offline theman3285

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I forgot to mention... for those classes we gave each student a photocopied version of the textbook (or at least the parts we were using). Use your schools binding machine to put these together. The textbook will no doubt have exercises as well, so they can spend some class time filling these in. Then you go over the answers together.

Obviously this idea is only practical if you have the same students everyday.

Basically, try innovate, but stick to a single format. 

Offline Mike.T

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If they are young and you haven't been set a theme you could try doing games from around the world? Seems boring but means you could teach them traditional games from around the world, with little prep? For example-whats the time Mr wolf. I am not doing this, but the previous teacher did... then when it was going well she asked for board games.

Not sure if this is helpful, but it worked well for her last year.

Good luck!

Last semester when I taught K-6 I tried things like that (simon says) and they just couldn't understand at all

now because of the law i teach 3-6 but I don't think they'd want to play those games especially everyday.
wouldn't that get boring?

When I first started there were activities which I thought were lame and didn't bother using. Then one day I had a surprise schedule change, and ended up incorporating one into my plan. To my surprise, it became the most popular game that my kids requested week after week for about two months straight...

If you're struggling for activities I'd suggest trying everything you find at least once, no matter how dumb it sounds. Worst case it bombs and you have a dry 40 minutes. If it works, note it down and compile a collection of activities you know work for your kids. Right now I've got a bin of 30-40 activities i can pick out of the air if I get a surprise schedule shift or a lesson bombs. For each activity I also spent 5 minutes making pretty rough ppts which act out how to play.

Would also recommend a textbook. Ask your co teacher if they can get one for you, or google around for one.