June 18, 2018, 11:52:14 AM

Author Topic: Is not paying pension legal?  (Read 2875 times)

Online kyndo

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Re: Is not paying pension legal?
« Reply #20 on: December 26, 2017, 09:07:53 AM »
Like there;s loads of Koreans working in the UK? I have never even met a Korean in the UK let alone worked with one! They don't exist. And they can't work in the UK anyway without a work permit (which means they need to be married to a UK guy or are a student who can work so many hours per week). Secondly, is the Korean government going to pay my flight over to Korea when I am 65 so that I can get my 6 months pension payments back? If not, then that 6months pension payments will go on the flight ticket to get it.  :laugh:
According to British census data, there are approximately 45,000 South Koreans registered as living in the UK, making it the largest Korean community in Europe (until Brexit, when that distinction will go back to Germany).
Work permits and student visas aren't terribly difficult to get in the UK, so there's no need to get married just to stay.
Finally, you don't need to physically be in Korea in order to collect your pension (although it would simplify things):

Online kyndo

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Re: Is not paying pension legal?
« Reply #21 on: December 27, 2017, 08:17:31 AM »
No there are no/not many Drs from outside of the EU/UK working in the UK. Most Drs working in the UK are either British or British born. Nurses are different. The UK had/has a shortage of nurses so the UK allowed phillipinos to work as nurses years ago. Samsung and LG would have to fill their positions first with a UK qualified person before they could get a Korean to perform the task. So even though these are Korean companies, they still have to abide by employment law and immigration law first before they can hire a Korean. Therefore, my original posts stands. To be able to get a job in the UK if you are from outside the EU (and once brexit starts even within the EU), then you have to either have a specialised job that no British person can do/be found or you need to have the "RIGHT" to remain and work in the UK which is usually on a spouse visa or student visa. :laugh:
Assuming that this is true, then what are the 45,000 Koreans living in the UK doing? They're not all running nail parlours.

Offline Dave Stepz

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Re: Is not paying pension legal?
« Reply #22 on: December 27, 2017, 09:07:44 AM »
No there are no/not many Drs from outside of the EU/UK working in the UK. Most Drs working in the UK are either British or British born. Nurses are different. The UK had/has a shortage of nurses so the UK allowed phillipinos to work as nurses years ago. Samsung and LG would have to fill their positions first with a UK qualified person before they could get a Korean to perform the task. So even though these are Korean companies, they still have to abide by employment law and immigration law first before they can hire a Korean. Therefore, my original posts stands. To be able to get a job in the UK if you are from outside the EU (and once brexit starts even within the EU), then you have to either have a specialised job that no British person can do/be found or you need to have the "RIGHT" to remain and work in the UK which is usually on a spouse visa or student visa. :laugh:
Assuming that this is true, then what are the 45,000 Koreans living in the UK doing? They're not all running nail parlours.

Korean companies place their staff in offices in England, as well as hiring local staff.  Lots of companies do this.  I have a friend who works for a diamond mining machinery company in Germany, he was previously in the US.  Can you imagine with the size of Samsung and LG how many Korean management staff they'd have in the UK?  Specialised jobs also includes chefs.....  There are way more Koreans in England than there are Brits in Korea.  Stats are way more useful here than, 'I've never seen a Korean working in England', bollocks. 

Offline Elegy

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Re: Is not paying pension legal?
« Reply #23 on: December 27, 2017, 09:40:18 AM »
The internationalteacher guy is deliberately baiting people, right?

There's no way someone could state, "I know no Koreans working in the UK" (implying that there aren't any Koreans working in the UK, apparently) when a simple Google search shows you all you need to know about the thousands of Korean nationals living and working in the UK.

There's no way someone could actually believe they could say there was a mistake on their nationality (???) and that they are actually American or Canadian (given that your passport no. and registration are on about every piece of official documentation made in Korea).

There's no way someone could say, in response to the statement that you can't fake nationality in 2017, that they are "cleverer than you think" and then proceed to repeatedly ask how to find incredibly simple pension information readily available on Waygook or from a 1 second Google search.

And there's no way someone from the United Kingdom, the birthplace of the English language, who claims to be a qualified and presumably professional instructor, would ever type something as inane as "Phillipinos". What in God's name is a Phillipino?

Online sligo

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Re: Is not paying pension legal?
« Reply #24 on: December 27, 2017, 09:54:10 AM »
The internationalteacher guy is deliberately baiting people, right?

There's no way someone could state, "I know no Koreans working in the UK" (implying that there aren't any Koreans working in the UK, apparently) when a simple Google search shows you all you need to know about the thousands of Korean nationals living and working in the UK.

There's no way someone could actually believe they could say there was a mistake on their nationality (???) and that they are actually American or Canadian (given that your passport no. and registration are on about every piece of official documentation made in Korea).

There's no way someone could say, in response to the statement that you can't fake nationality in 2017, that they are "cleverer than you think" and then proceed to repeatedly ask how to find incredibly simple pension information readily available on Waygook or from a 1 second Google search.

And there's no way someone from the United Kingdom, the birthplace of the English language, who claims to be a qualified and presumably professional instructor, would ever type something as inane as "Phillipinos". What in God's name is a Phillipino?

I guess this is what 4.6 milllion a month (after tax) does to someone....or they keep skipping their meds.

Online kyndo

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Re: Is not paying pension legal?
« Reply #25 on: December 27, 2017, 10:09:28 AM »
Assuming that this is true, then what are the 45,000 Koreans living in the UK doing? They're not all running nail parlours.
Korean companies place their staff in offices in England, as well as hiring local staff.  Lots of companies do this.  I have a friend who works for a diamond mining machinery company in Germany, he was previously in the US.  Can you imagine with the size of Samsung and LG how many Korean management staff they'd have in the UK?  Specialised jobs also includes chefs.....  There are way more Koreans in England than there are Brits in Korea.  Stats are way more useful here than, 'I've never seen a Korean working in England', bollocks.
Yeah, sorry, I meant the question to be snidely rhetorical in response to internationalteacher's (ridiculously incorrect) observation.
 But yeah, your comment rings true: multinational companies like Samsung employ thousands of Koreans in their international offices, and Koreans have pretty large expat communities all over the world (I lived next to one in Vancouver: neat to see a tiny bit of Korea (noraebangs, pc rooms and all) plopped down in the middle of Vancouver). Stands to reason that there are going to be a lot of Koreans working in the wealthier, more desireable countries (of which the UK still counts as one of, despite Brexit looming on the horizon :wink:)


What in God's name is a Phillipino?
A young Phillip.

Offline Dave Stepz

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Re: Is not paying pension legal?
« Reply #26 on: December 27, 2017, 10:19:40 AM »
Assuming that this is true, then what are the 45,000 Koreans living in the UK doing? They're not all running nail parlours.
Korean companies place their staff in offices in England, as well as hiring local staff.  Lots of companies do this.  I have a friend who works for a diamond mining machinery company in Germany, he was previously in the US.  Can you imagine with the size of Samsung and LG how many Korean management staff they'd have in the UK?  Specialised jobs also includes chefs.....  There are way more Koreans in England than there are Brits in Korea.  Stats are way more useful here than, 'I've never seen a Korean working in England', bollocks.
Yeah, sorry, I meant the question to be snidely rhetorical in response to internationalteacher's (ridiculously incorrect) observation.
 But yeah, your comment rings true: multinational companies like Samsung employ thousands of Koreans in their international offices, and Koreans have pretty large expat communities all over the world (I lived next to one in Vancouver: neat to see a tiny bit of Korea (noraebangs, pc rooms and all) plopped down in the middle of Vancouver). Stands to reason that there are going to be a lot of Koreans working in the wealthier, more desireable countries (of which the UK still counts as one of, despite Brexit looming on the horizon :wink:)

 :-* Yep, I know that you know that.  I don't like to reply directly to socks.   :laugh:  Last week, in my mum's tiny village (600 people) in the Peak District, she mentioned that she met someone in the butchers who was talking about fried pork and kimchi.  Curious, asked her if she was Korean, she said she was.  :huh: Cue my mum chatting to her for ages from my imparted Korean knowledge  :laugh: 

Online sligo

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Re: Is not paying pension legal?
« Reply #27 on: December 27, 2017, 11:09:33 AM »
Assuming that this is true, then what are the 45,000 Koreans living in the UK doing? They're not all running nail parlours.
Korean companies place their staff in offices in England, as well as hiring local staff.  Lots of companies do this.  I have a friend who works for a diamond mining machinery company in Germany, he was previously in the US.  Can you imagine with the size of Samsung and LG how many Korean management staff they'd have in the UK?  Specialised jobs also includes chefs.....  There are way more Koreans in England than there are Brits in Korea.  Stats are way more useful here than, 'I've never seen a Korean working in England', bollocks.
Yeah, sorry, I meant the question to be snidely rhetorical in response to internationalteacher's (ridiculously incorrect) observation.
 But yeah, your comment rings true: multinational companies like Samsung employ thousands of Koreans in their international offices, and Koreans have pretty large expat communities all over the world (I lived next to one in Vancouver: neat to see a tiny bit of Korea (noraebangs, pc rooms and all) plopped down in the middle of Vancouver). Stands to reason that there are going to be a lot of Koreans working in the wealthier, more desireable countries (of which the UK still counts as one of, despite Brexit looming on the horizon :wink:)

 :-* Yep, I know that you know that.  I don't like to reply directly to socks.   :laugh:  Last week, in my mum's tiny village (600 people) in the Peak District, she mentioned that she met someone in the butchers who was talking about fried pork and kimchi.  Curious, asked her if she was Korean, she said she was.  :huh: Cue my mum chatting to her for ages from my imparted Korean knowledge  :laugh:

That's all well and good, but as Internationalmoron didn't see it, it didn't happen!

Offline solveit

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Re: Is not paying pension legal?
« Reply #28 on: December 27, 2017, 11:33:40 AM »
.



Eh... to get a work permit you don't have to be married to someone from the UK or a student. Think of all the hundreds of doctors and nurses working in the UK from countries outside the EU. And there are plenty of Koreans working in the UK - Samsung and LG both have UK headquarters with considerable numbers of Korean employees, just as an example.

No there are no/not many Drs from outside of the EU/UK working in the UK. Most Drs working in the UK are either British or British born. Nurses are different. The UK had/has a shortage of nurses so the UK allowed phillipinos to work as nurses years ago. Samsung and LG would have to fill their positions first with a UK qualified person before they could get a Korean to perform the task. So even though these are Korean companies, they still have to abide by employment law and immigration law first before they can hire a Korean. Therefore, my original posts stands. To be able to get a job in the UK if you are from outside the EU (and once brexit starts even within the EU), then you have to either have a specialised job that no British person can do/be found or you need to have the "RIGHT" to remain and work in the UK which is usually on a spouse visa or student visa. :laugh:

I don't know what you class as "not many", but approx 1/5 of doctors currently employed by the UK are from outside the UK/EU.

Online JNM

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Re: Is not paying pension legal?
« Reply #29 on: December 27, 2017, 08:34:22 PM »
This is taken from Wiki: Large numbers of Koreans began to settle in the UK in the 1980s, mostly near London; the highest concentration can be found in the town of New Malden, where estimates of the Korean population range from 8,000 to as high as 20,000 people.[1][14][15] Factors which may have attracted them to New Malden include cheap housing, the previous presence of a Japanese community in the area, and the "bandwagon effect" of a few prominent Korean businesses in the area early on.[1] In the 1990s, the area came to prominence as a hub for the Korean community; the high concentration of Koreans there meant that adult immigrants, especially women, tend not to speak much English, even after years of residence in the United Kingdom.[16] During the 2002 FIFA World Cup, Koreans from all over the country flocked to the town to gather with their co-ethnics and show support for the Korea Republic national football team.[17][18]

Other areas with a Korean presence include Golders Green, where Korean and Japanese immigrants have been visibly replacing the older, diminishing Jewish community.[19]

Of the total of 392 North Korean-born residents recorded by the 2011 census, 251 lived in Greater London, 47 in North-West England and 30 in Yorkshire and the Humber.[3]



As I have never been to any of these places, it is no surprise that I have never seen a Korean in the UK. Of course I have bumped into Koreans in London, eg when getting my E2 visa and just because I said that I hadn't ever come across a korean in the UK, didn't mean that there aren't any Koreans in the UK. Apparently there are 45000 registered Koreans in the UK. This does not mean they are all working for Samsung or LG or even Kia. It does not mean they are all working at all. Also the population of the UK is 60million which makes 45000 negligible.

So for unqualified teacher sligo to make the "M" remark is uncalled for.

Solveit, well there may be a lot of non-EU Drs in the UK but then the UK needs Doctors so has to get them from abroad.

I am afraid that in the UK, a phillipino is a national of the Phillippines (nb also spelt Filipino sometime too.) Perhaps it's not used in the US then.  However, a teacher in my office is married to a Phillipino and he has mentioned this word himself a few times so I am not the only one who uses it. What does Elegy call a national of the Phillippines then I wonder?:laugh:


So to summarise, 45000 is a tiny amount of people in the UK, a small percentage of whom will be working on work permits or married to a Brit. New Malden is where most Koreans hang out and I have never been to NM hence this is why I probably have not come across any Koreans working or living in the UK. :laugh: You STILL need a work permit to come to the UK to work whether or not you work for Samsung or LG.


The intra-company transfer visa is a Tier 2 visa and it means that an overseas organisation such as Samsung or LG can send a Korean national over to work in the UK so long as the position can not be filled by a suitable new recruit in the UK. It must also be a long-term job not short term as this is now closed.  Here is the link to the visa https://www.gov.uk/tier-2-intracompany-transfer-worker-visa


Finally, here is a list of ALL work visas in the UK https://www.gov.uk/browse/visas-immigration/work-visas :laugh:

With the amount of effort you have put into whining about your lost pension funds, you could have been making bank on tutorials and earned all of it back!

Online kyndo

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Re: Is not paying pension legal?
« Reply #30 on: December 27, 2017, 08:55:59 PM »
I am afraid that in the UK, a phillipino is a national of the Phillippines Philippines (nb also spelt Filipino sometime too.) Perhaps it's not used in the US then.  However, a teacher in my office is married to a Phillipino and he has mentioned this word himself a few times so I am not the only one who uses it. What does Elegy call a national of the Phillippines Philippines then I wonder?:laugh:
The word "Filipino" is derived from the name of the Spanish King Felipe II (known as Philip II in the English speaking world). There is no reason for anybody to ever use a double L (ie: the King's name was Felipe, not Fellipe).
The "Ph" is also incorrect. While it's true that the English spelling of Felipe is 'Philip', the Filipino alphabet pre-1987 did not contain the letter 'F', so they substituted it with the letter 'P' so that it was "Pilipino".
(Source)

'Phillipino' is clearly stated to be an internationally recognized misspelling (as can be seen here, as explained by actual Filipinos).


And work permits are a dime a dozen: all us poor saps managed to score one, right?  :laugh:
« Last Edit: December 27, 2017, 09:00:52 PM by kyndo »

Online sligo

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Re: Is not paying pension legal?
« Reply #31 on: December 27, 2017, 11:31:45 PM »


As I have never been to any of these places, it is no surprise that I have never seen a Korean in the UK. Of course I have bumped into Koreans in London, eg when getting my E2 visa and just because I said that I hadn't ever come across a korean in the UK, didn't mean that there aren't any Koreans in the UK.


Like there;s loads of Koreans working in the UK? I have never even met a Korean in the UK let alone worked with one! They don't exist. And they can't work in the UK anyway without a work permit (which means they need to be married to a UK guy or are a student who can work so many hours per week). Secondly, is the Korean government going to pay my flight over to Korea when I am 65 so that I can get my 6 months pension payments back? If not, then that 6months pension payments will go on the flight ticket to get it.  :laugh:

"M" word! (with a 45% warning - as i said, not that clever!)

Offline Elegy

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Re: Is not paying pension legal?
« Reply #32 on: December 28, 2017, 07:48:14 AM »
I am afraid that in the UK, a phillipino is a national of the Phillippines (nb also spelt Filipino sometime too.) Perhaps it's not used in the US then.  However, a teacher in my office is married to a Phillipino and he has mentioned this word himself a few times so I am not the only one who uses it. What does Elegy call a national of the Phillippines then I wonder?:laugh:

This is brilliant, and has utterly made my morning.

No educated, worldly, or even moderately literate person uses the word "Phillipino". Filipino, yes, but not "Phillipino".

My word, is London often spelled "Lunden"? Or is Wales "Whales" sometimes, as well? Korea is commonly spelled "Corea", right?  :laugh:

This is fantastic!

Every post he makes is like comedic gold, it must be a brilliant troll account (either way, keep it coming because these posts brighten up a rather dreary winter!)
« Last Edit: December 28, 2017, 07:55:59 AM by Elegy »

Offline solveit

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Re: Is not paying pension legal?
« Reply #33 on: December 29, 2017, 01:02:07 AM »
Wrong! Both words are used interchangeably. In fact, I thought that Filipino was the wrong way to spell it and ph was correct! If you think about it, a Brazilian comes from Brazil, a German from Germany so why not a Philippino from the Phils? Who says it's wrong anyway? So to bed with your "which moderately literate person or worldly wise person...yada yada yada..."  I have seen both forms of the words many times. It is not wrong to use the ph spelling IMO. And your story about your mom in the Lake District was utterly hilarious to read too during my sojourn in Yangmingshan mountain of Taiwan before I go back to polluted China. Just goes to show where all these 45000 Koreans (mostly on student or spouse visas I reckon) travel to. :laugh:

Kyndo explained why a person from the Philippines is called a Filipino (or Filipina if female). Google "what is a person from the Phillipines called" and you'll see in 10 seconds that it can be Filipino or Pilipino, but never ever Philipino.

If I'm not mistaken you lived in, and had/have a girlfriend from, the Phillipines, so you have to know this, which makes me think you're just trolling.

Online kyndo

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Offline solveit

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Re: Is not paying pension legal?
« Reply #35 on: December 30, 2017, 01:27:27 AM »
You have to be trolling. You lived in the Philipines. There's no way you didn't hear anyone use the "p" pronunciation. I've only spent 5 days there and I heard it more than once.

Offline internationalteacher

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Re: Is not paying pension legal?
« Reply #36 on: January 03, 2018, 12:21:18 PM »
You have to be trollingcorrect. You lived in the Philipines Philippines. There's no way you didn't hear anyone use the "p" pronunciation spelling. I've only spent 5 days there and I heard it more than once.
Talk about the pot calling the kettle black...I tell ya. :laugh:

Offline gurudanny98

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Re: Is not paying pension legal?
« Reply #37 on: January 03, 2018, 12:52:15 PM »
maybe it'll be better to get back on topic? Not paying pension or healthcare is ileagal. Don't let your hogwon tell you about  false legal loophole pipedreams to get you to agree to not having it

Offline solveit

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Re: Is not paying pension legal?
« Reply #38 on: January 08, 2018, 12:59:24 AM »
You have to be trollingcorrect. You lived in the Philipines Philippines. There's no way you didn't hear anyone use the "p" pronunciation spelling. I've only spent 5 days there and I heard it more than once.
Talk about the pot calling the kettle black...I tell ya. :laugh:

I made a typo, you just made up nonsense... how can you hear a spelling? Troll.

Offline internationalteacher

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Re: Is not paying pension legal?
« Reply #39 on: January 08, 2018, 09:34:31 PM »
You have to be trollingcorrect. You lived in the Philipines Philippines. There's no way you didn't hear anyone use the "p" pronunciation spelling. I've only spent 5 days there and I heard it more than once.
Talk about the pot calling the kettle black...I tell ya. :laugh:

I made a typo, you just made up nonsense... how can you hear a spelling? Troll.
You can't hear a spelling correct. That's why we were talking about how to SPELL the word Filipino, not how to pronounce it.  We all know how it is pronounced!  Mamaaaaaaaaaaa.....It's dat man again :laugh: :laugh: