February 16, 2019, 03:53:36 PM


Author Topic: How can I be a fun teacher?  (Read 3778 times)

Offline gurudanny98

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Re: How can I be a fun teacher?
« Reply #20 on: December 21, 2017, 06:50:56 PM »
I worked at a place 2 years ago, replacing a teacher who let the students play in class, go through the books quickly and never really buckled down to study. I was a taste of bad medicine to these kids.  Even though I was fun and easy-going, I made them study and focus on the lesson. It was also a bad hogwon because I didn't have support from the Korean staff who saw the students as little won signs  They didn't like me because of that. The teacher that the OP probably replaced probably spoiled the kids as well.

Offline imtwina

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Re: How can I be a fun teacher?
« Reply #21 on: December 22, 2017, 10:00:02 AM »
I don't know how to build rapport

For non after school classes I usually do

-Greetings
-Sometimes a warm up game if I can think up one or find one that fits
-The book
-Ending game

I recommend always doing a warm up. Every month you can introduce a new song...even for 5 and 6 graders.  Some good ones are "Today is Monday" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i-7V__eJHuo&list=PLOuDQ8I5zQ9cIlZ-rxTaghGCD2xopMjxH&index=12 or "The Months Song" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XaOMTy3uQEo&list=PLOuDQ8I5zQ9cIlZ-rxTaghGCD2xopMjxH&index=10  Or a song with a hand clapping exercise "A sailor went to sea, sea, sea." Or What's the Word PPT games. Your warm up doesn't have to be related to the lesson.  It's just to get them in to English mode. 
To build "rapport" just try to get to know the kids.  Talk to them in the hallway or at lunch. Definitely try to learn some of their names. Ask them how to say things in Korean.  Don't be afraid to be silly in class. Give the kids opportunities to prove what they have learned already and praise them when they do.
Also, talk to your co-teacher about lessons. You may not need to teach everything in the book.  Just focus on one or two elements.  And, you don't have to play a game every lesson.  Try role-playing or dramatizing dialogs. Or have the kids draw something related to the lesson but personalized. Or do a crossword or word search. If you are looking for more games try Games and Activities on esltreasure.com or Games that Don't Need Technology http://www.waygook.org/index.php/topic,4535.msg25125.html#msg25125
For afterschool programs, don't over-think it by trying to plan something new and brilliant - use the resources here to get you inspired. http://www.waygook.org/index.php?board=22.0 If you need a "game" to use in a pinch, try Spoons with playing cards.  3-6 graders all like it and you can play it for 15 - 25 minutes. Instead of eliminating players, have the loser of each round spell out the word S-P-O-O-N-S


Offline tryingtogettokorea

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Re: How can I be a fun teacher?
« Reply #22 on: December 22, 2017, 12:07:46 PM »
I don't know how to build rapport

For non after school classes I usually do

-Greetings
-Sometimes a warm up game if I can think up one or find one that fits
-The book
-Ending game

I recommend always doing a warm up. Every month you can introduce a new song...even for 5 and 6 graders.  Some good ones are "Today is Monday" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i-7V__eJHuo&list=PLOuDQ8I5zQ9cIlZ-rxTaghGCD2xopMjxH&index=12 or "The Months Song" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XaOMTy3uQEo&list=PLOuDQ8I5zQ9cIlZ-rxTaghGCD2xopMjxH&index=10  Or a song with a hand clapping exercise "A sailor went to sea, sea, sea." Or What's the Word PPT games. Your warm up doesn't have to be related to the lesson.  It's just to get them in to English mode. 
To build "rapport" just try to get to know the kids.  Talk to them in the hallway or at lunch. Definitely try to learn some of their names. Ask them how to say things in Korean.  Don't be afraid to be silly in class. Give the kids opportunities to prove what they have learned already and praise them when they do.
Also, talk to your co-teacher about lessons. You may not need to teach everything in the book.  Just focus on one or two elements.  And, you don't have to play a game every lesson.  Try role-playing or dramatizing dialogs. Or have the kids draw something related to the lesson but personalized. Or do a crossword or word search. If you are looking for more games try Games and Activities on esltreasure.com or Games that Don't Need Technology http://www.waygook.org/index.php/topic,4535.msg25125.html#msg25125
For afterschool programs, don't over-think it by trying to plan something new and brilliant - use the resources here to get you inspired. http://www.waygook.org/index.php?board=22.0 If you need a "game" to use in a pinch, try Spoons with playing cards.  3-6 graders all like it and you can play it for 15 - 25 minutes. Instead of eliminating players, have the loser of each round spell out the word S-P-O-O-N-S
All the 3-6th graders, I know their names. Kindergarten I know most. 1st and 2nd I know one or two. I do try to talk to them though there's not much time out of class since I'm prepping, and at lunch I can't sit with them.
I do ask them how to say things in Korean a lot though lol, but I am afraid to be silly. I'm highly embarrassed but I'll try to be more silly... i dont really know how...

Oh I actually don't play a game every class... if I cant find a proper game I use worksheets instead... maybe i shouldve mentioned that

I will definitely use song warm ups

ive tried none english related warm ups as well which they enjoyed and then they went back to hating the lesson after the game or they just wanted to keep playing the game

It's mostly my 4th grade class i struggle with... theyre rude and hate everything. i used to do warm up songs with them and they hated it... unless it's kpop... and then if its kpop they just wanna listen to it the entire 80 minutes of class time

Ive also tried to have 4th grade draw related things to the lesson - they love drawing - however they like just drawing one anime character.... they dont want to draw something relatable

What in the book do you usually skip? 1 period isn't much in the book. so idk what id skip besides what i already skip which is the games they have in there. the book lesson is already short...

I also don't have a co teacher... i teach alone. there's no english teacher here. just home room teachers. i dont think they know the answer of what to teach since theyve never taught english... before me there was a net here for like 4-5 years

Thank you so much for all the links and help btw!!!
« Last Edit: December 22, 2017, 12:09:43 PM by tryingtogettokorea »

Offline travelinpantsgirl

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Re: How can I be a fun teacher?
« Reply #23 on: January 02, 2018, 07:45:46 AM »
Don't take your job or yourself too seriously. Before anyone jumps on me saying that I am saying slack off or don't do your job, that is not what I am saying. I am saying, particularly at the elementary level, especially in public, a greater part of the job is cultural not English. English is just a secondary by-product. Definitely teach them but, but do it in a way that is just more of a play environment. I second a rapport though. I am only successful because I establish a rapport with my students every time. I teach high school. Sometimes they say or do shocking stuff to be funny, to test me. As long they don't break my basic rules of respect (and they know what those rules are), I don't try to police them.
I don't like kpop and I don't pretend to. I don't like soccer. My rapport is based on my love for them and teaching and they know it. That's all I can say. Find something you love about them and/or the job and use that to fuel your rapport with them.

people keep saying rapport... i can't even build rapport with people my age... much less children who cant understand me
I am not at all trying to be rude, but perhaps you are in the wrong field? Although, I am a massive introvert, in the classroom I transform into extraverted introvert. Teaching is a very social profession. If you have difficulty building rapport with English speaking adults, no matter the advice you are given here you are not going to connect with your students. If you really love teaching your students it will show and a natural rapport will happen but if you don't they will also know that and will do very little for you. Children are like dogs, their scent skills are higher than adults. They can tell/feel emotions emanating from others. If they feel you don't enjoy being their teacher, they will not enjoy being your students and will very likely not cooperate.
If, still, you want to make it work anyway, I recommend buy some pedagogical books on connecting with students. There are loads out there on Amazon.
Ignoranţa este adesea o boală fatal şi cretin nu poate fi vindecata.

Online fishead

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Re: How can I be a fun teacher?
« Reply #24 on: February 05, 2018, 06:46:27 AM »
 Wear a set of Mickey Mouse ears.
You will instantly be transformed into the fun teacher.

Offline tryingtogettokorea

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Re: How can I be a fun teacher?
« Reply #25 on: March 12, 2018, 11:13:29 AM »
Don't take your job or yourself too seriously. Before anyone jumps on me saying that I am saying slack off or don't do your job, that is not what I am saying. I am saying, particularly at the elementary level, especially in public, a greater part of the job is cultural not English. English is just a secondary by-product. Definitely teach them but, but do it in a way that is just more of a play environment. I second a rapport though. I am only successful because I establish a rapport with my students every time. I teach high school. Sometimes they say or do shocking stuff to be funny, to test me. As long they don't break my basic rules of respect (and they know what those rules are), I don't try to police them.
I don't like kpop and I don't pretend to. I don't like soccer. My rapport is based on my love for them and teaching and they know it. That's all I can say. Find something you love about them and/or the job and use that to fuel your rapport with them.

people keep saying rapport... i can't even build rapport with people my age... much less children who cant understand me
I am not at all trying to be rude, but perhaps you are in the wrong field? Although, I am a massive introvert, in the classroom I transform into extraverted introvert. Teaching is a very social profession. If you have difficulty building rapport with English speaking adults, no matter the advice you are given here you are not going to connect with your students. If you really love teaching your students it will show and a natural rapport will happen but if you don't they will also know that and will do very little for you. Children are like dogs, their scent skills are higher than adults. They can tell/feel emotions emanating from others. If they feel you don't enjoy being their teacher, they will not enjoy being your students and will very likely not cooperate.
If, still, you want to make it work anyway, I recommend buy some pedagogical books on connecting with students. There are loads out there on Amazon.

Yes, you're right.I consider myself an extrovert...I hate being alone and find it to be boring yet being with people causes anxiety smdh.
This is why I decided not to teach anymore even before I wrote this post. The problem is, I have so many months left so I need to make it work for the time being.

Offline Sautee

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Re: How can I be a fun teacher?
« Reply #26 on: April 05, 2018, 11:55:36 AM »
Have you consider that the problem might not be your personality but your teaching method?

I only ask that because this changes the perspective from why I'm personally wrong for teaching to what am I doing that's wrong? I don't mean this as an attack but a necessary shift in perspective.

I know, at least in NYC, first-time teachers usually have an environment of support, that is mentors and observers that give back feedback. They also have spend weeks, if not months, observing and being guided by more experience teachers. Furthermore, they're always get further education and workshops in their field.

For us EFL teachers in Korea, we have none of those. And in a number of cases, this may be first gig teaching. Which includes myself.

--
So instead of asking how I can be a fun teacher. You'll find more useful information by giving us your lesson plan and your class procedures, how your students react and behavior and etc. And then the teachers with more experience and skills can break down what you can do to improve.

But if you just ask "How can I be a fun teacher?" is a useless question that will get answers of questionable worth. Cause the main question you need to ask yourself is, "what am I doing that works?" and "what am I doing that doesn't work?" Fun is nice but skill, knowledge and experience is what we look for in leaders.

And a teacher is a leadership position. No matter how much some teachers want to shirk the title and its associated responsibilities.
« Last Edit: April 05, 2018, 12:02:58 PM by Sautee »

Online fishead

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Re: How can I be a fun teacher?
« Reply #27 on: April 05, 2018, 01:09:13 PM »
Have you consider that the problem might not be your personality but your teaching method?

I only ask that because this changes the perspective from why I'm personally wrong for teaching to what am I doing that's wrong? I don't mean this as an attack but a necessary shift in perspective.

I know, at least in NYC, first-time teachers usually have an environment of support, that is mentors and observers that give back feedback. They also have spend weeks, if not months, observing and being guided by more experience teachers. Furthermore, they're always get further education and workshops in their field.

For us EFL teachers in Korea, we have none of those. And in a number of cases, this may be first gig teaching. Which includes myself.

--
So instead of asking how I can be a fun teacher. You'll find more useful information by giving us your lesson plan and your class procedures, how your students react and behavior and etc. And then the teachers with more experience and skills can break down what you can do to improve.

But if you just ask "How can I be a fun teacher?" is a useless question that will get answers of questionable worth. Cause the main question you need to ask yourself is, "what am I doing that works?" and "what am I doing that doesn't work?" Fun is nice but skill, knowledge and experience is what we look for in leaders.

And a teacher is a leadership position. No matter how much some teachers want to shirk the title and its associated responsibilities.

 Lots of times people confuse these things because they are reacting to feedback from Korean English teachers that might not be familar with a lot of the language used when being critical of an ESL teacher. Also lots of the criticism is second hand and translated direct from feedback from students parents. Often the Korean teacher will not be able to pinpoint the exact terms needed to critique the lesson on hand so they rely only on what they know from their limited vocabulary. They will also revert back to lots of stereotypical  KBS English programs with Isiaac Durst because for the most part that has been their only positive image of a NET.

 As a result KET teachers and reluctant to discuss issues related to classroom management with the NET. Although in many cercumstances when the NET has a reputation as being a boring fuddy duddy their are also lots of classroom management issues at play.

Offline Sautee

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Re: How can I be a fun teacher?
« Reply #28 on: April 05, 2018, 01:37:46 PM »
Ok, so here's the 411.

You don't need to be a fun teacher to be a good teacher. Although the two can feed into each other.

I'm sure you've had teachers who you thought had a great personality but when it came down to the actual class you didn't learn very much. And conversely, you had teachers that were strict and dour but you learned a lot.

In the latter, those classes might have even been fun because the teacher knew how to challenge you as a student. If you like playing video games, there's a lot of parallels between video game design and lesson planning.

For instance, tic-tac-toe might be fun for kids but any reasonably intelligent teen will figure out the limitations of winning and losing. Furthermore killing 5 rats to level up might not be bad but having to do that 50-100 times is going to tax even the most patient person.

Why do I mention this? It's because you have to think of it in terms of effort to purpose and effort to outcome.

If the player doesn't have any idea what purpose they're putting their effort towards, or if that effort seems grossly out of balance with the outcome—the player will be frustrated or bored.

Likewise repetition of the trivial or of already learnt material is infantile to anyone. What's 1+1? Good! What's 1+2? Great! What 1+3? Wow! What's 1+4? Awesome! What's 1+5? Cool! and etc.

So what's my point? It's that I want you to start planning with purpose—with always the linguistic purpose in mind.
Sure I can make them listen and repeat the whole audio but if the activity at the end only uses the two sentences, do I spend 5 minutes on listen and repeat or 2 minutes on cue-response drills instead?

Sure I can spend 2 hours making cards for them to play but will a 15 minute powerpoint do the same purpose instead?

Break your lesson planning into:
What you want the students to be able to do.
How to check they're able to do it.
How you will have them practice.
How you will teach them how to do it.
And how you will have them put what they learned to use.

Next, think about execution—classroom management, instruction-giving and actual presentation. What are you doing while actually teaching, are you just reading off the page or are you actually pay attention to what the students are doing? And, during each lesson, always have a notebook either on hand or in your mind where you note things that you can do differently to improve the execution of your next lesson.

There's more to know and consider,  but I think following these principles will help you improve your teaching vastly more than just "oh be more outgoing" or "do more interesting games".

And finally, right now you're a teacher. So putting in the work to understand and practice teaching methodology, especially CELTA or TESOL or TEFL teaching should not be a trite consideration but something you should actively do.

If only so teaching becomes an active experience to get better at it and not a passive one to suffer through.
« Last Edit: April 05, 2018, 09:08:58 PM by Sautee »