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Author Topic: Teaching in Canada vs Teaching in Korea  (Read 3115 times)

Offline Foreverparadise

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Re: Teaching in Canada vs Teaching in Korea
« Reply #20 on: August 23, 2018, 01:41:04 AM »
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hey, Foreverparadise, I have a question for you, as someone who is also a member of OCT and have been teaching aborad as a minority.  *not as long as you! kudos.

how hard was the transition back to Canada, especially now that you are teaching in a reservation school? was it your last choice in terms of job opportunities? is your eventual goal to teach in Ontario?
I handled the transition the best as I did. The difference is that the job I do here in Canada is more demanding and the kids on this reserve are a lot more difficult to deal with because a number of them have special needs and a number of them are from very toxic home environments and bring these behaviors into the school. I am teaching one subject here as I did in Korea so my teaching duties is rotary, but the difference is I am teaching Music here and not EFL. When I was unemployed for 9 months my first choice was to get into a school board in Southern Ontario. Perhaps not the ones in the Greater Toronto Area but the school boards like Ottawa-Carleton, Upper Canada, Simcoe, Limestone, and Kawartha Lakes. I even applied for jobs at the job fair in Toronto, but I got two interviews with the Near North DSB and Keewatin-Patricia DSB in Northern Ontario. Neither of them did not hire me. But I was offered two contracts, one in China and one for the reservation. I considered going to Shenzhen, China but I wound up choosing to work for the First Nations reserve school board. But even if I had a choice between teaching for a Southern Ontario school board, and teaching here in Northern Ontario, I would have chosen to stay in Southern Ontario, even if it was a First Nations reserve in Southern Ontario.

I want to come back and teach in Canada at some point, but it doesn't have to be Ontario - so im looking at different parts of Canada like BC, but how was the market when you came back?
If you are an OCT teacher, your first priority is to start out here in Ontario. You can consider BC but you won't do well financially if you chose to work in the lower mainland although the job market in BC is very good. Ontario on the other hand is saturated but you can still get opportunities as an occasional teacher. But in Ontario there is a regulation 274 that requires all teachers in Ontario public school boards to start out as supply teachers if they are new teachers who've either just graduated or have worked for x number of years outside of Ontario and then return to Ontario. Lucky for me I did not go through that process being hired to teach for a First Nations school board.

do you miss korea? i'm teaching in Japan now, and I do want to teach in korea for at least a year, and I wonder how your experiences have been!
I worked in Japan for a year and I left because the pay way not good and Japan is too expensive although Japan is a beautiful country. If you want to teach in Korea, you will have to return to your home country first because in Japan, they do not have any notary publics to notarize your degree, plus you need to do a police check from Canada because Japanese won't do that for you. As for my experiences, I adjusted much better in Korea than I did in Japan because Korea is relatively cheaper, and the money I made was better given the fact that they provided me with housing, I had to pay utility bills which are way cheaper than Japan. Plus I can read Korean so getting around was easier for me. I also had a Korean driver's license so that helped very much because I was able to drive in Korea in fact, buying a used car in Korea was also way cheaper for me than Japan so I did a lot better in Korea than I did in Japan.

Online Sharks9

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Re: Teaching in Canada vs Teaching in Korea
« Reply #21 on: September 03, 2018, 12:31:53 PM »
I've only been in Korea 2 weeks, but one really nice advantage about Korea I've noticed is the huge amount of prep time. Back in Canada I had around 4 hours of prep total per week, with one day a week having 0 prep time and just teaching straight from 9-3:30. It made most of my nights and weekends filled with lesson prep instead of being able to relax at home. Looking at my schedule here, it should be a lot easier for me to get all my prep done at school and actually be able to relax and explore Korea on evenings and weekends!

Online oglop

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Re: Teaching in Canada vs Teaching in Korea
« Reply #22 on: September 03, 2018, 12:45:54 PM »
I've only been in Korea 2 weeks, but one really nice advantage about Korea I've noticed is the huge amount of prep time. Back in Canada I had around 4 hours of prep total per week, with one day a week having 0 prep time and just teaching straight from 9-3:30. It made most of my nights and weekends filled with lesson prep instead of being able to relax at home. Looking at my schedule here, it should be a lot easier for me to get all my prep done at school and actually be able to relax and explore Korea on evenings and weekends!
Yep. I have friends in England and the amount of time they spend outside of work doing marking, prepping, etc is insane. I'd like to see some Korean teachers try it out for a week and see how they get on

Not sure why anyone would want to be a teacher in England to be honest

Offline Foreverparadise

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Re: Teaching in Canada vs Teaching in Korea
« Reply #23 on: September 04, 2018, 09:05:59 PM »
I've only been in Korea 2 weeks, but one really nice advantage about Korea I've noticed is the huge amount of prep time. Back in Canada I had around 4 hours of prep total per week, with one day a week having 0 prep time and just teaching straight from 9-3:30. It made most of my nights and weekends filled with lesson prep instead of being able to relax at home. Looking at my schedule here, it should be a lot easier for me to get all my prep done at school and actually be able to relax and explore Korea on evenings and weekends!

Dead on!
I rarely ever took my work home when I was in Korea. I had so much time to relax
and get certain things done during my spare time and explore Korea on weekends.

Here in Canada, I have to spend time at home preparing for classes for each following day.
A lot of the prep time I had at work last year is gone now that I have to do classroom
support.

Offline Foreverparadise

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Re: Teaching in Canada vs Teaching in Korea
« Reply #24 on: December 07, 2018, 12:18:04 AM »
After teaching in Canada for one year, another difference I have noticed between teaching in Canada and
teaching in Korea is health and safety. When I was in Korea I was not required for any of this, but here in
Canada I had to do certification for health and safety, along with First Aid. And just yesterday I completed
an online training in concussions. I don't know about how it is for the local teachers in Korea, but for us
teachers in Canada we got o do these health and safety trainings to ensure a lot of safety in our schools.
Because from what I have noticed, safety standards in our schools in Canada is of higher standard than
South Korea. Twice in Korea have I seen students slam into glass doors and break them, one of them
wond up bleeding from his head.

And speaking of safety, in Korea when kids are on their recess breaks, they run around in and outside the school
building. Here in Canada, that is illegal. Plus we don't allow students to be left unattended in classrooms in
Canada unlike South Korea.

Online tylerthegloob

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Re: Teaching in Canada vs Teaching in Korea
« Reply #25 on: December 07, 2018, 07:26:30 AM »
And speaking of safety, in Korea when kids are on their recess breaks, they run around in and outside the school
building. Here in Canada, that is illegal.

Today, I learned that in Canada it is illegal for kids to run around during their break at school.

Offline Foreverparadise

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Re: Teaching in Canada vs Teaching in Korea
« Reply #26 on: December 07, 2018, 10:12:30 PM »
And speaking of safety, in Korea when kids are on their recess breaks, they run around in and outside the school
building. Here in Canada, that is illegal.

Today, I learned that in Canada it is illegal for kids to run around during their break at school.

To be more specific, it is illegal in Canada for kids to run around inside the school building during
recess, and to be in the classrooms unsupervised.

Online Mr.DeMartino

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Re: Teaching in Canada vs Teaching in Korea
« Reply #27 on: December 08, 2018, 10:08:19 AM »

And speaking of safety, in Korea when kids are on their recess breaks, they run around in and outside the school
building. Here in Canada, that is illegal. Plus we don't allow students to be left unattended in classrooms in
Canada unlike South Korea.

You do realize that's a bad thing Canada is doing and a good thing Korea is doing, right? Research into child development has shown that this recent development of constant supervision and mortal terror over the slightest bump has had a catastophic effect on children's mental health.

Children need free, unsupervised time to play games, interact, get into fights, and get injured. It makes them stronger and helps them grow.

The WORST thing you can do for them is have them under constant supervision.

Online oglop

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Re: Teaching in Canada vs Teaching in Korea
« Reply #28 on: December 08, 2018, 12:37:13 PM »
Yeah I agree

I did a lesson about this ted talk recently actually. Was pretty interesting.

"5 dangerous things you should let your kids do"

https://ed.ted.com/featured/MlRn8Y1O#review
« Last Edit: December 09, 2018, 12:39:00 PM by oglop »

Offline Foreverparadise

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Re: Teaching in Canada vs Teaching in Korea
« Reply #29 on: December 10, 2018, 10:58:55 PM »

And speaking of safety, in Korea when kids are on their recess breaks, they run around in and outside the school
building. Here in Canada, that is illegal. Plus we don't allow students to be left unattended in classrooms in
Canada unlike South Korea.

You do realize that's a bad thing Canada is doing and a good thing Korea is doing, right? Research into child development has shown that this recent development of constant supervision and mortal terror over the slightest bump has had a catastophic effect on children's mental health.

Children need free, unsupervised time to play games, interact, get into fights, and get injured. It makes them stronger and helps them grow.

The WORST thing you can do for them is have them under constant supervision.

OK so let me give you an example.
I used to teach EFL at a local middle school in rural Korea. In that school the doors to
the different rooms are built with glass. During breaks in between classes the kids would run
around inside the building, but during winter they stayed inside. There was 3 incidents in which
I heard glass breaking because students would run into the glass from playing. Out of
3 incidents, one of them was bleeding from his head and had to be signed out of school
for the rest of the day to get treatment. Thank God he did not bust an artery, because if
that happened, it would have been worse. This is why in Canada teachers have to get
certification for First Aid traning and training for concussions. You will also notice that in
Korea a lot of schools have steps built out of granite. These stepts have very sharp corners
that if any of these kids slip, their injuries would be very bad because the corners of these
steps in most Korean schools do not have rubber guards on them. That is a safety hazard.

And in cause you didn't know, South Korea has the higest rates of accident related deaths
amoung children in the OECD. Yes, I think we should let kids be kids but safety comes first.
Also supervision is important because you will never know what will happen. If we teachers
are going to be employed to have kids in out care Mondays to Fridays 9-3, it is out responsibility
to not only build their minds, but make a safe learning environment for them. I don't want
any child going home with any untreated mass injuries.

Offline KimDuHan

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Re: Teaching in Canada vs Teaching in Korea
« Reply #30 on: Yesterday at 03:37:16 AM »

And speaking of safety, in Korea when kids are on their recess breaks, they run around in and outside the school
building. Here in Canada, that is illegal. Plus we don't allow students to be left unattended in classrooms in
Canada unlike South Korea.

You do realize that's a bad thing Canada is doing and a good thing Korea is doing, right? Research into child development has shown that this recent development of constant supervision and mortal terror over the slightest bump has had a catastophic effect on children's mental health.

Children need free, unsupervised time to play games, interact, get into fights, and get injured. It makes them stronger and helps them grow.

The WORST thing you can do for them is have them under constant supervision.

When I was growing up in Canada there was one teacher who watched the whole student body at recess. Most of the time the teacher wasn't even outside because he/she had to make sure the students in the computer room were not looking at certain things.

Needless to say we were mostly unsupervised and other than some fights and injuries from falling off playground equipment no one left in an ambulance.

Offline Foreverparadise

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Re: Teaching in Canada vs Teaching in Korea
« Reply #31 on: Yesterday at 04:45:12 AM »

And speaking of safety, in Korea when kids are on their recess breaks, they run around in and outside the school
building. Here in Canada, that is illegal. Plus we don't allow students to be left unattended in classrooms in
Canada unlike South Korea.

You do realize that's a bad thing Canada is doing and a good thing Korea is doing, right? Research into child development has shown that this recent development of constant supervision and mortal terror over the slightest bump has had a catastophic effect on children's mental health.

Children need free, unsupervised time to play games, interact, get into fights, and get injured. It makes them stronger and helps them grow.

The WORST thing you can do for them is have them under constant supervision.

When I was growing up in Canada there was one teacher who watched the whole student body at recess. Most of the time the teacher wasn't even outside because he/she had to make sure the students in the computer room were not looking at certain things.

Needless to say we were mostly unsupervised and other than some fights and injuries from falling off playground equipment no one left in an ambulance.

The question is: Do you think Canadians are setting the standards or have set the high standards for
safety in schools, or are we Canadians in this day and age becoming too paranoid?

Online JNM

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Re: Teaching in Canada vs Teaching in Korea
« Reply #32 on: Yesterday at 08:04:57 AM »

And speaking of safety, in Korea when kids are on their recess breaks, they run around in and outside the school
building. Here in Canada, that is illegal. Plus we don't allow students to be left unattended in classrooms in
Canada unlike South Korea.

You do realize that's a bad thing Canada is doing and a good thing Korea is doing, right? Research into child development has shown that this recent development of constant supervision and mortal terror over the slightest bump has had a catastophic effect on children's mental health.

Children need free, unsupervised time to play games, interact, get into fights, and get injured. It makes them stronger and helps them grow.

The WORST thing you can do for them is have them under constant supervision.

When I was growing up in Canada there was one teacher who watched the whole student body at recess. Most of the time the teacher wasn't even outside because he/she had to make sure the students in the computer room were not looking at certain things.

Needless to say we were mostly unsupervised and other than some fights and injuries from falling off playground equipment no one left in an ambulance.

The question is: Do you think Canadians are setting the standards or have set the high standards for
safety in schools, or are we Canadians in this day and age becoming too paranoid?

Before you read this, please sign the attached waiver.  /s

I think that some the American liability mindset has crossed the border.

When somebody gets hurt, they (and family, and the family lawyer) are looking for somebody to blame (i.e. sue).

This has let to a defensive posture among care-givers (daycares, school, hospitals, sports clubs, etc.) because the question is often "did you take all reasonable steps to prevent the injury".

Korea does not have the same liability mindset. They are still in the "stuff happens" mindset, and are starting to get into the "you are accountable for yourself" mindset. 

Online CO2

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Re: Teaching in Canada vs Teaching in Korea
« Reply #33 on: Yesterday at 08:48:59 AM »
I remember getting in trouble becasue the 6 groups in my class all played Go Fish amongst themselves (4 players per group) One group made a rule by themselves that the loser would get punched in the arm.

So, one kid gets punched in the arm and cries. "Kevin, why didn't you stop them?"

They made this by themselves in a language I don't understand. F off.

Same thing with the kids running into glass doors in an earlier comment.

Hey Kid. Don't run around the school. Kids walk home here every day. They trip on the sidewalk, whose fault is that? Ours? The parents? The city?

Or is it that kids make mistakes and get hurt? 
Yes, to dance beneath the diamond sky
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