May 24, 2018, 04:35:12 AM

Author Topic: Teaching for First Nations  (Read 7477 times)

Online Foreverparadise

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Re: Teaching for First Nations
« Reply #80 on: May 02, 2018, 12:55:09 AM »
I am winding down to 7 and a half weeks until the school year comes to an end.
As I said, I will be returning here for the 2018-2019 schoolyear, but will it be
my last year to teach here on this reserve? If it is then I will have to apply to
teach for other school boards, but my application to these other employers will
have to be done as early as this fall.

But as for now, I just have to worry about what is happening at this time. The
school board sent us the new academic year calendar for 2018-2019. The
school year will start a week earlier than this one and end a week earlier
next year.

As I wait for the schoolyear to finish, I will look forward because the weather is
becoming more enjoyable. The most important thing is thinking about my students,
How will I have an impact on them to influence making a difference in their lives?
How will these students recieve me as I continue teaching them music next year?
Will they become more adjusted to me? I ask these questions because there are
still a few students who are not identified but have issues with uncultured
behaviour.

I can only look to what is ahead, the past days are dead. So I will do my
best to enjoy my work throughout the rest of the school year.

Offline eggieguffer

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Re: Teaching for First Nations
« Reply #81 on: May 02, 2018, 05:28:28 AM »
Quote
I ask these questions because there are
still a few students who are not identified but have issues with uncultured
behaviour.

You should probably know all the names of your students by now, no?

Offline Dave Stepz

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Re: Teaching for First Nations
« Reply #82 on: May 02, 2018, 06:42:11 AM »
Quote
I ask these questions because there are
still a few students who are not identified but have issues with uncultured
behaviour.

You should probably know all the names of your students by now, no?

To me, one of the most important things.  Using the student's name is the first step to getting and showing respect, rather than, 'Hey......you there. Come here'.  Usually, it is the noisier/smarter students that you get to know first. 

Online JNM

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Re: Teaching for First Nations
« Reply #83 on: May 02, 2018, 06:51:14 AM »
Quote
I ask these questions because there are
still a few students who are not identified but have issues with uncultured
behaviour.

You should probably know all the names of your students by now, no?
I think he is using "not identified" as a clinical term for "not having any identified mental health issues".

Offline eggieguffer

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Re: Teaching for First Nations
« Reply #84 on: May 02, 2018, 08:57:27 AM »
Quote
there are
still a few students who are not identified but have issues with uncultured
behaviour.

So is this the latest euphemism for naughty?

Online Foreverparadise

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Re: Teaching for First Nations
« Reply #85 on: May 03, 2018, 07:10:42 AM »
Quote
there are
still a few students who are not identified but have issues with uncultured
behaviour.

So is this the latest euphemism for naughty?

I guess so.

Online JNM

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Re: Teaching for First Nations
« Reply #86 on: May 03, 2018, 07:11:39 AM »
Quote
there are
still a few students who are not identified but have issues with uncultured
behaviour.

So is this the latest euphemism for naughty?

I guess so.

Can't say "savage" anymore, I guess.

Offline Dave Stepz

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Re: Teaching for First Nations
« Reply #87 on: May 03, 2018, 07:24:39 AM »
Quote
there are
still a few students who are not identified but have issues with uncultured
behaviour.

So is this the latest euphemism for naughty?

I guess so.

Can't say "savage" anymore, I guess.

*ahem*

Kids with 'unknown behavioural boundaries'!

Offline slycordinator

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Re: Teaching for First Nations
« Reply #88 on: May 04, 2018, 07:34:23 AM »
Quote
I ask these questions because there are
still a few students who are not identified but have issues with uncultured
behaviour.

You should probably know all the names of your students by now, no?
I think he is using "not identified" as a clinical term for "not having any identified mental health issues".
I think he actually means that they have one which has not been diagnosed/identified.

Like, in Korea there are plenty of special needs kids who don't get the help they need because the parents don't want to admit that their kid has something going on.

Online JNM

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Re: Teaching for First Nations
« Reply #89 on: May 04, 2018, 07:37:11 AM »
Quote
I ask these questions because there are
still a few students who are not identified but have issues with uncultured
behaviour.

You should probably know all the names of your students by now, no?
I think he is using "not identified" as a clinical term for "not having any identified mental health issues".
I think he actually means that they have one which has not been diagnosed/identified.

Like, in Korea there are plenty of special needs kids who don't get the help they need because the parents don't want to admit that their kid has something going on.

That is what I said.

Offline eggieguffer

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Re: Teaching for First Nations
« Reply #90 on: May 04, 2018, 07:40:37 AM »
Quote
I ask these questions because there are
still a few students who are not identified but have issues with uncultured
behaviour.

You should probably know all the names of your students by now, no?
I think he is using "not identified" as a clinical term for "not having any identified mental health issues".
I think he actually means that they have one which has not been diagnosed/identified.

Like, in Korea there are plenty of special needs kids who don't get the help they need because the parents don't want to admit that their kid has something going on.

That is what I said.

How does he know they have a mental health condition if it hasn't been identified? Is he a trained educational psychologist?

Online JNM

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Re: Teaching for First Nations
« Reply #91 on: May 04, 2018, 09:00:39 AM »
Quote
I ask these questions because there are
still a few students who are not identified but have issues with uncultured
behaviour.

You should probably know all the names of your students by now, no?
I think he is using "not identified" as a clinical term for "not having any identified mental health issues".
I think he actually means that they have one which has not been diagnosed/identified.

Like, in Korea there are plenty of special needs kids who don't get the help they need because the parents don't want to admit that their kid has something going on.

That is what I said.

How does he know they have a mental health condition if it hasn't been identified? Is he a trained educational psychologist?

FFS, read what he wrote: Not identified, but have behavioral issues.

Surely a teacher can say that without a PhukinDoctorate in brain surgery!

Offline slycordinator

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Re: Teaching for First Nations
« Reply #92 on: May 04, 2018, 09:43:34 AM »
How does he know they have a mental health condition if it hasn't been identified? Is he a trained educational psychologist?
Do you have to be a psychologist/psychiatrist to figure out that someone has a mental health issue? I've got little training and have seen people I've known have some sort of mental health condition.

I think he is using "not identified" as a clinical term for "not having any identified mental health issues".
I think he actually means that they have one which has not been diagnosed/identified.

Like, in Korea there are plenty of special needs kids who don't get the help they need because the parents don't want to admit that their kid has something going on.

That is what I said.
I only clarified it because "not having any identified mental health issues" can mean both "not having any mental health issues" and "having one/some that are currently not identified."

Offline eggieguffer

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Re: Teaching for First Nations
« Reply #93 on: May 04, 2018, 09:50:31 AM »
Quote
I ask these questions because there are
still a few students who are not identified but have issues with uncultured
behaviour.

You should probably know all the names of your students by now, no?
I think he is using "not identified" as a clinical term for "not having any identified mental health issues".
I think he actually means that they have one which has not been diagnosed/identified.

Like, in Korea there are plenty of special needs kids who don't get the help they need because the parents don't want to admit that their kid has something going on.

That is what I said.

How does he know they have a mental health condition if it hasn't been identified? Is he a trained educational psychologist?

FFS, read what he wrote: Not identified, but have behavioral issues.

Surely a teacher can say that without a PhukinDoctorate in brain surgery!

I was responding to Slycoordinator, apologies for wire crossing
« Last Edit: May 04, 2018, 09:53:39 AM by eggieguffer »

Offline slycordinator

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Re: Teaching for First Nations
« Reply #94 on: May 04, 2018, 11:54:51 AM »
By the way, I was simply stating that saying "He's not identified" can mean that he has an unidentified issue. I wasn't saying that the teacher knows the details like a psychologist. But it definitely happens where teachers spot issues that need to be followed up with one.

Offline eggieguffer

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Re: Teaching for First Nations
« Reply #95 on: May 04, 2018, 12:00:21 PM »
By the way, I was simply stating that saying "He's not identified" can mean that he has an unidentified issue. I wasn't saying that the teacher knows the details like a psychologist. But it definitely happens where teachers spot issues that need to be followed up with one.

I think the confusion arises from the differences between an identified issue and simply bad behaviour. If there is a difference nowadays. I admit I don't know much about child psychology but from what I've seen in documentaries, when a kid plays up there is always a technical sounding reason given. Is this the same as an identified issue? 

Offline slycordinator

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Re: Teaching for First Nations
« Reply #96 on: May 04, 2018, 12:23:39 PM »
By the way, I was simply stating that saying "He's not identified" can mean that he has an unidentified issue. I wasn't saying that the teacher knows the details like a psychologist. But it definitely happens where teachers spot issues that need to be followed up with one.

I think the confusion arises from the differences between an identified issue and simply bad behaviour. If there is a difference nowadays. I admit I don't know much about child psychology but from what I've seen in documentaries, when a kid plays up there is always a technical sounding reason given. Is this the same as an identified issue?
Let's say you're an elementary teacher who sees the same class all day every day.

There's a kid who is rarely looks people in the eyes, rarely initiates conversation, seems to lack empathy, really hates being touched, etc.

While these might involve some bad behavior, it's not bad behavior. But they're some things a teacher might see and tell the parents about. It's why they have teacher/parent conferences.

Heck, sometimes teachers in that situation know better than the parent about it.

Online Foreverparadise

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Re: Teaching for First Nations
« Reply #97 on: May 16, 2018, 11:58:24 PM »
I am not going to be easy on my worst behaving students. I imposed a detention to
four boys this morning by taking away their morning recess because they have ruined my class
this morning. One of them being the ring leader of that gang of boys in this class
who uses is strong influence to bring down my class. They came in for my detention and
they were still being amorally rude. I called their parents, and I got no answer, but I was
still able to leave a message to one of their parents. I doubt that they will answer back.

One of my students who misehaved in my class on Monday was also give a detention.
he did not show up so he still owes me time for detention next time. I was successful
calling his home and able to speak to his mother about his deplorable behavior in
my class. All she responded with was "Yes, Ok, Ok. Sure, OK." Is that the response
of a useless parent or what?

These boys are all in grade 4 and grade 5. The boys in grade 5 I dealt with
were still not being compliant with me during detention. They are so rude
and uncultured that they might wind up with criminal records in the next
10 years from now. However I don't wish any bad things on them because
it is not their fault why they behave this way. Two of these boys are identified
and one of them (the leader of that gang) is supposed to be identified with
FAS (Fetal Alcohol Syndrome). Because that boy from what I heard has a
mother who is a drunkard. You see it is not their fault why these boys are vicious.
It is the fault of their useless parents. But I cannot tell them up front that
their parents are useless. I did mention to them that they must have bad home
life and it's not their fault, but at the same time I told them that now is the
time for them to know that they must also learn to be responsible for their
own actions. These boys are not being taught these values at home which
is why they have no discipline. You tell them to do something and
they refuse to listen. They continuously keep disrupting my class to a
point that the girls and a few other boys are being annoyed when they
want to learn and participate. Today, they have completely ruined my
class and it made me feel very angry.

While I had them on detention, these boys tell me to go back to Korea
where there will be WW III between Kim Jeong Un and Donald Trump.
Well first of all I am not Korean. Secondly, I told them up front that I
am a Canadian citizen so I am not going anywhere. Then these boys
tell me that I am on the reservation, but I said this reservation is still
in Canada. I even told them that my ancestors didn't come to this land
to invade because my parents came here as immigrants legally. This is
what I have to put up with, in fact I need to be careful that I do not
bow down to their low level.

I just feel rage within me when dealing with these boys. I feel rage
because I am unable to send them to the office, instead what I had
to do was fill out incident reports on what happened. This school is
a school where there are a lot of students with needs, and to fulfill
these needs is a challenge for us staff members. I am not going
to stress out myself too much inspite of the lower back pain that
I had to deal with since last week Saturday.

 I made my decision to
come back to teach next year, but after talking to my mother about
this, she does advise that I should make 2018-2019 my final year
teaching on the reservation. As long as I do well on my teacher
apprasials I should be able to get my foot further in the door for teaching
in a public school board here in Ontario, or perhaps move to British
Columbia. Or I may get another teaching opportunity for another First
Nations community school in Ontario or Quebec. I hate to move
overseas again.

Just 6 more weeks to go and I will have my summer break. But when
I give these boys their final report cards for this year, they will not like it.