September 26, 2018, 04:51:58 AM


Author Topic: Do you teach the difference between England and the UK?  (Read 4423 times)

steviegerro

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Re: Do you teach the difference between England and the UK?
« Reply #40 on: March 22, 2017, 03:35:41 PM »
What difference?

I will not bite, I will not bite, I will not bite!  :laugh:

Offline lazerbullet

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Re: Do you teach the difference between England and the UK?
« Reply #41 on: March 22, 2017, 04:56:36 PM »
Northern Irish person here of Irish descent.

This has come up in my classes as I've just started a new school in which they've told everyone I'm from the UK. I've told all my 4th and 5th grade classes that I'm from the UK and then explained that the UK includes Northern Ireland and that England is an individual country. When the flashcards show England next to the union jack and the students answer "I'm from England" I usually correct to the UK and I've also pointed out that I consider myself Irish. (This was all somewhat negated when I had to do the school English morning broadcast and my CT had me talking about food in Britain and I had to lead in by saying I was from the UK and then the related video talked about only English food...). I usually relate the Irish divided situation to the fact Korea is also divided and, with adults, I usually talk about how Japan invaded Korea in the same way England invaded Ireland to try and make it relatable.

With my 3rd grade students I just left it as is because i don't think it is massively important for that age.

Fact is, this is a complicated issue and it is important to teach accurate information but, on the other hand, we are English teachers and not geography or history teachers. My feeling is that I will teach it if I feel it is appropriate to bring up at the time but, honestly, I have had to explain it many times over to adults and students and people still don't quite understand (especially when you bring up the religious aspects of the divide). I tend to focus on accuracy in English language, hope students will be interested and understand the situation and realise they will probably pick up this particular information later in life if they need to. I've spent as long trying to explain the situation to other nationalities with similar results in fairness.

So, tl:dr no harm in bringing it up but it isn't the most important thing in the world.

I think the Japan/Korea thing is a good way of relating it to them. Though @eggie obviously no analogy is perfect. Maybe it's better to compare the home nations that make up the UK to provinces that make up korea? But then does kind of lose the subtlety that they are nations/kingdoms themselves.

Online eggieguffer

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Re: Do you teach the difference between England and the UK?
« Reply #42 on: March 22, 2017, 05:07:06 PM »
Northern Irish person here of Irish descent.

This has come up in my classes as I've just started a new school in which they've told everyone I'm from the UK. I've told all my 4th and 5th grade classes that I'm from the UK and then explained that the UK includes Northern Ireland and that England is an individual country. When the flashcards show England next to the union jack and the students answer "I'm from England" I usually correct to the UK and I've also pointed out that I consider myself Irish. (This was all somewhat negated when I had to do the school English morning broadcast and my CT had me talking about food in Britain and I had to lead in by saying I was from the UK and then the related video talked about only English food...). I usually relate the Irish divided situation to the fact Korea is also divided and, with adults, I usually talk about how Japan invaded Korea in the same way England invaded Ireland to try and make it relatable.

With my 3rd grade students I just left it as is because i don't think it is massively important for that age.

Fact is, this is a complicated issue and it is important to teach accurate information but, on the other hand, we are English teachers and not geography or history teachers. My feeling is that I will teach it if I feel it is appropriate to bring up at the time but, honestly, I have had to explain it many times over to adults and students and people still don't quite understand (especially when you bring up the religious aspects of the divide). I tend to focus on accuracy in English language, hope students will be interested and understand the situation and realise they will probably pick up this particular information later in life if they need to. I've spent as long trying to explain the situation to other nationalities with similar results in fairness.

So, tl:dr no harm in bringing it up but it isn't the most important thing in the world.

I think the Japan/Korea thing is a good way of relating it to them. Though @eggie obviously no analogy is perfect. Maybe it's better to compare the home nations that make up the UK to provinces that make up korea? But then does kind of lose the subtlety that they are nations/kingdoms themselves.

The thing is, in my experience,  what nialjcr says to his students is what they pretty much all assume anyway - that England 'conquered' the whole of Ireland but were forced to give most of it back, except the Northern bit. They generally find it interesting to get the truth.