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Author Topic: Shops for Men in Korea  (Read 4029 times)

Offline fdny

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Re: Shops for Men in Korea
« Reply #20 on: February 13, 2017, 04:26:52 PM »
I guess a big problem is that these things do exist, but it is hard to find
them if you aren't fluent in Korean.

Offline gogators!

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Re: Shops for Men in Korea
« Reply #21 on: February 13, 2017, 05:52:42 PM »
Do they have classes where you can make your own small bookshelves and TV stands, that sort of thing?

If not, where can you buy the wood/lumber? Online only?

She built a little stand thing for our classroom kettle and coffee fixings, and she said she build a little table thing for her house. Also a bunch of elephant shaped cell phone holders for Xmas gifts for people.

So, I'm sure there are classes where you could do mini bookshelves or TV stands like you wanted - I'm just not the right guy to ask where or how to find them.

And yeah - probably online only for the wood, unless you're out in the country and you can find a wood store type thing.

Thanks, I guess the little things are better than nothing if they don't have anything for bigger projects, since I don't really see myself ordering wood from online. Such disappoint.
I've seen stores that sell wood between Bundang and Kwangju (Kyonggi) and with a little help from google or naver maps you may be able to find one nearer to you.

DIY is catching on a bit regarding interior decorating. I saw stuff you can put together in the new Hyundai Outlet in Dongdaemun and there are Benjamin Moore stores in Korea. I guess it really is "The World of Paint."

Online Chinguetti

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Re: Shops for Men in Korea
« Reply #22 on: February 15, 2017, 07:48:47 AM »
Thanks, you guys, I'll look around town to see what I can find, and, if that fails, I'll look into the DIY online.

Online JNM

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Re: Shops for Men in Korea
« Reply #23 on: February 21, 2017, 08:34:20 PM »
I was thinking about Canadian Tire today.

Tools.
Autoparts.
Sporting equipment.
Firearms and ammo.
Clothing.
Kitchen tools.

If they had a meat counter, Canadian men would never need to go to any other stores, ever.

Offline bmym80

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Re: Shops for Men in Korea
« Reply #24 on: February 22, 2017, 02:46:37 PM »
I was thinking about Canadian Tire today.

Tools.
Autoparts.
Sporting equipment.
Firearms and ammo.
Clothing.
Kitchen tools.

If they had a meat counter, Canadian men would never need to go to any other stores, ever.
Still need to get maple syrup. Maybe they could use some of the ammo and and get the syrup from the source.

Online JNM

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Re: Shops for Men in Korea
« Reply #25 on: February 22, 2017, 03:01:22 PM »
I was thinking about Canadian Tire today.

Tools.
Autoparts.
Sporting equipment.
Firearms and ammo.
Clothing.
Kitchen tools.

If they had a meat counter, Canadian men would never need to go to any other stores, ever.
Still need to get maple syrup. Maybe they could use some of the ammo and and get the syrup from the source.

Never got that at a store in Canada.  Always at the shack or a roadside stand.

Offline Lurch

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Re: Shops for Men in Korea
« Reply #26 on: February 23, 2017, 08:37:15 AM »
Every Korean 도구 store I've ever found has been a disorganized, dark, dingy and dusty hole in the wall that sells largely cheap crap from China and maybe a smattering of overpriced power tools. And they're always very specific in what they sell. Only plumbing supplies. Only woodworking. Only nuts and bolts! (I kid you not. And they didn't even have the size I needed!)

A Canadian Tire-style hardware store could make a killing here.

Online Mr.DeMartino

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Re: Shops for Men in Korea
« Reply #27 on: February 23, 2017, 09:35:07 AM »
Also, clubs and classes are really popular here - they provide a venue for people to do something when space in the home is limited.

The approach here is often one of "clubs and classes".

Nobody builds a boat in their garage, or re-does their own flooring, or changes their own motor oil.

It boils down to a cultural difference. In the west, independence and self-sufficiency *of individuals* is valued.  Here, not as much.

First, Korea's extensive urbanization, population density, lack of arable land, and land prices might have something to do with this.

How stupid are people? They all went to college but lack the critical thinking to understand how a country the size of Indiana with 50 million people and 60% mountains might make it difficult to own a 4 bedroom house with a garage, backyard, and swimming pool.

Second the way you frame your conclusions is so narrowminded. While they may not value those things as much, they might also value things like frugality or certain kinds of efficiency more. DIY for oil changes is basically a hobby when you consider costs, time, and disposal. Unless you know someone with a decent set of tools and a decent jack that you can borrow, it would take damn near a lifetime to recoup the savings.While I enjoy an afternoon listening to a ballgame and working on my car as much as the next person, having the guy at Speedmate do the brakes and oil at a much cheaper rate than back homewhile I shop at emart or watch a movie has its own appeal.

Online JNM

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Re: Shops for Men in Korea
« Reply #28 on: February 23, 2017, 09:50:03 AM »
Also, clubs and classes are really popular here - they provide a venue for people to do something when space in the home is limited.

The approach here is often one of "clubs and classes".

Nobody builds a boat in their garage, or re-does their own flooring, or changes their own motor oil.

It boils down to a cultural difference. In the west, independence and self-sufficiency *of individuals* is valued.  Here, not as much.

First, Korea's extensive urbanization, population density, lack of arable land, and land prices might have something to do with this.

How stupid are people? They all went to college but lack the critical thinking to understand how a country the size of Indiana with 50 million people and 60% mountains might make it difficult to own a 4 bedroom house with a garage, backyard, and swimming pool.

Second the way you frame your conclusions is so narrowminded. While they may not value those things as much, they might also value things like frugality or certain kinds of efficiency more. DIY for oil changes is basically a hobby when you consider costs, time, and disposal. Unless you know someone with a decent set of tools and a decent jack that you can borrow, it would take damn near a lifetime to recoup the savings.While I enjoy an afternoon listening to a ballgame and working on my car as much as the next person, having the guy at Speedmate do the brakes and oil at a much cheaper rate than back homewhile I shop at emart or watch a movie has its own appeal.

[Ignores troll]






Offline gogators!

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Re: Shops for Men in Korea
« Reply #29 on: February 23, 2017, 10:09:33 AM »
Also, clubs and classes are really popular here - they provide a venue for people to do something when space in the home is limited.

The approach here is often one of "clubs and classes".

Nobody builds a boat in their garage, or re-does their own flooring, or changes their own motor oil.

It boils down to a cultural difference. In the west, independence and self-sufficiency *of individuals* is valued.  Here, not as much.

First, Korea's extensive urbanization, population density, lack of arable land, and land prices might have something to do with this.

How stupid are people? They all went to college but lack the critical thinking to understand how a country the size of Indiana with 50 million people and 60% mountains might make it difficult to own a 4 bedroom house with a garage, backyard, and swimming pool.

Second the way you frame your conclusions is so narrowminded. While they may not value those things as much, they might also value things like frugality or certain kinds of efficiency more. DIY for oil changes is basically a hobby when you consider costs, time, and disposal. Unless you know someone with a decent set of tools and a decent jack that you can borrow, it would take damn near a lifetime to recoup the savings.While I enjoy an afternoon listening to a ballgame and working on my car as much as the next person, having the guy at Speedmate do the brakes and oil at a much cheaper rate than back homewhile I shop at emart or watch a movie has its own appeal.
Now you're knocking hobbies?

Shopping at emart--what a blast! Is that where you buy your straw men?

Offline kobayashi

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Re: Shops for Men in Korea
« Reply #30 on: February 23, 2017, 10:29:27 AM »
there are plenty of shops for men in korea. just look out for signs saying 'business club' or 'room salon'.

Offline fdny

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Re: Shops for Men in Korea
« Reply #31 on: February 23, 2017, 11:15:44 AM »
First, Korea's extensive urbanization, population density, lack of arable land, and land prices might have something to do with this.

How stupid are people? They all went to college but lack the critical thinking to understand how a country the size of Indiana with 50 million people and 60% mountains might make it difficult to own a 4 bedroom house with a garage, backyard, and swimming pool.

I don't think Mr.DeMartino is being a troll.  He is just ignorant. Population density
in Korea is quite high, but not overly so compared to other countries.  The Japanese
have wonderful, efficient, compact houses.  They also have cultures, subcultures
and fringes.  The Koreans are all pretty much the same.

Population Density

23   Korea, South     491.78   
28   Netherlands      406.26   
34   Philippines         358.89   
37   Belgium            342.29   
38   Japan               336.33

I think most westerners are used to the European legacy of over a thousand years
of culture, learning, agricultural surplus, exchange of information.  Whereas Korea
began with about a two hundred year period of cultural and technical isolation which
led to them being pretty much in the stone age when Japan invaded in the early 20th
century.  Then 40 years of brutal domination and cultural erasure finally resulted in
an empty society and culture in 1945.  Then war. Then dictators.  Then a drive for
economic prosperity which left every other consideration as irrelevant.  Modern Koreans
simply have no idea what culture is.  There is no tradition of craftsmanship, hobbies,
leisure activities.

Online Mr.DeMartino

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Re: Shops for Men in Korea
« Reply #32 on: February 23, 2017, 04:02:15 PM »
First, Korea's extensive urbanization, population density, lack of arable land, and land prices might have something to do with this.

How stupid are people? They all went to college but lack the critical thinking to understand how a country the size of Indiana with 50 million people and 60% mountains might make it difficult to own a 4 bedroom house with a garage, backyard, and swimming pool.

I don't think Mr.DeMartino is being a troll.  He is just ignorant. Population density
in Korea is quite high, but not overly so compared to other countries.  The Japanese
have wonderful, efficient, compact houses.  They also have cultures, subcultures
and fringes.  The Koreans are all pretty much the same.

Population Density

23   Korea, South     491.78   
28   Netherlands      406.26   
34   Philippines         358.89   
37   Belgium            342.29   
38   Japan               336.33

I think most westerners are used to the European legacy of over a thousand years
of culture, learning, agricultural surplus, exchange of information.  Whereas Korea
began with about a two hundred year period of cultural and technical isolation which
led to them being pretty much in the stone age when Japan invaded in the early 20th
century.  Then 40 years of brutal domination and cultural erasure finally resulted in
an empty society and culture in 1945.  Then war. Then dictators.  Then a drive for
economic prosperity which left every other consideration as irrelevant.  Modern Koreans
simply have no idea what culture is.  There is no tradition of craftsmanship, hobbies,
leisure activities.

http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/stats/Agriculture/Arable-land/Hectares

When you factor in population density with arable land, South Korea pretty much comes out on top save for incredibly small countries or island nations save for perhaps Bangladesh.

I don't understand moving to a completely different culture and country and being angry that the locals don't share the same interests. "People in San Francisco are so stupid. No one wants to watch NASCAR and shoot empties with a .45 in their backyard. Why don't they learn how to hunt or turbocharge lawnmowers? And they buy catfish instead of just going to the local crick and noodlin one"
« Last Edit: February 23, 2017, 04:11:00 PM by Mr.DeMartino »

Offline jamienottingham

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Re: Shops for Men in Korea
« Reply #33 on: February 23, 2017, 07:13:21 PM »
Every Korean 도구 store I've ever found has been a disorganized, dark, dingy and dusty hole in the wall that sells largely cheap crap from China and maybe a smattering of overpriced power tools. And they're always very specific in what they sell. Only plumbing supplies. Only woodworking. Only nuts and bolts! (I kid you not. And they didn't even have the size I needed!)

A Canadian Tire-style hardware store could make a killing here.

I went to 3 different hardware stores today, and showing them a metric 8mm bolt, they all looked at it like it was from another planet, or said we only sell nails.

Online JNM

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Re: Shops for Men in Korea
« Reply #34 on: February 23, 2017, 07:29:47 PM »
Every Korean 도구 store I've ever found has been a disorganized, dark, dingy and dusty hole in the wall that sells largely cheap crap from China and maybe a smattering of overpriced power tools. And they're always very specific in what they sell. Only plumbing supplies. Only woodworking. Only nuts and bolts! (I kid you not. And they didn't even have the size I needed!)

A Canadian Tire-style hardware store could make a killing here.

I went to 3 different hardware stores today, and showing them a metric 8mm bolt, they all looked at it like it was from another planet, or said we only sell nails.

Not only that, but even if was is a bolt guy down the road (next to the hinge guy), they wouldn't know (or care).

Offline gogators!

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Re: Shops for Men in Korea
« Reply #35 on: February 25, 2017, 11:51:19 PM »
First, Korea's extensive urbanization, population density, lack of arable land, and land prices might have something to do with this.

How stupid are people? They all went to college but lack the critical thinking to understand how a country the size of Indiana with 50 million people and 60% mountains might make it difficult to own a 4 bedroom house with a garage, backyard, and swimming pool.

I don't think Mr.DeMartino is being a troll.  He is just ignorant. Population density
in Korea is quite high, but not overly so compared to other countries.  The Japanese
have wonderful, efficient, compact houses.  They also have cultures, subcultures
and fringes.  The Koreans are all pretty much the same.

Population Density

23   Korea, South     491.78   
28   Netherlands      406.26   
34   Philippines         358.89   
37   Belgium            342.29   
38   Japan               336.33

I think most westerners are used to the European legacy of over a thousand years
of culture, learning, agricultural surplus, exchange of information.  Whereas Korea
began with about a two hundred year period of cultural and technical isolation which
led to them being pretty much in the stone age when Japan invaded in the early 20th
century.  Then 40 years of brutal domination and cultural erasure finally resulted in
an empty society and culture in 1945.  Then war. Then dictators.  Then a drive for
economic prosperity which left every other consideration as irrelevant.  Modern Koreans
simply have no idea what culture is.  There is no tradition of craftsmanship, hobbies,
leisure activities.

http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/stats/Agriculture/Arable-land/Hectares

When you factor in population density with arable land, South Korea pretty much comes out on top save for incredibly small countries or island nations save for perhaps Bangladesh.

I don't understand moving to a completely different culture and country and being angry that the locals don't share the same interests. "People in San Francisco are so stupid. No one wants to watch NASCAR and shoot empties with a .45 in their backyard. Why don't they learn how to hunt or turbocharge lawnmowers? And they buy catfish instead of just going to the local crick and noodlin one"
"I don't understand." No kidding!

https://www.quora.com/Whats-a-good-hunting-club-or-strategy-to-find-one-in-the-Bay-Area

http://www.nascar.com/en_us/nascar-tracks/sonoma-raceway.html

But, hey, according to you Kenya leads the field in high tech sports training and the captain and crew of the Sewol were completely blameless. And the moon is made of green cheese.