December 11, 2018, 09:01:59 PM


Author Topic: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli  (Read 8253 times)

Online zola

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Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« on: October 21, 2016, 01:46:36 PM »
http://m.koreatimes.co.kr/phone/news/view.jsp?req_newsidx=216513


If anything goes wrong in Korea, the “ppalli ppalli” culture is to blame.

The logic behind it is that Koreans tend to do whatever it takes to get the job done ppalli ppalli, or on the double.

When the Sewol ferry sank, this mentality or, more exactly, an extension of it in the form of cutting corners, took the blame. The big ferry took on more freight than allowed and failed to secure it properly inside the cargo bay. The result was comparable to items in an overhead locker being shifted during a turbulent flight. A top-heavy modification reduced the ship’s ability to bounce back after listing to one side and sank it. Two-hundred-ninety-five people, mostly students on a school trip, were killed with nine listed missing.

The same goes with the problem of Samsung Electronics’ Galaxy Note 7, whose production and sale have been terminated for good after some devices were reported exploding. The media and experts blame Samsung for making too much haste in launching the latest jumbo smartphone ahead of its rival Apple. The result is that they say Samsung remains clueless about the cause of the explosions

The fingers of blame are being wagged by both Koreans and foreigners. But it is not incorrect to say it was foreigners, from their third-party perspective, who first identified this weak point standing in the way of Korea’s last push to becoming a fully developed country.

Their rationale: Koreans have turned their country from the world’s most impoverished nation into one of its leading economies in a short period of time. As a result, their ability to pay attention to detail and consider safety first, traits common within developed nations, were lost in the transition.

They would tell Korea to get rid of it or remain a second-rate nation. Now, it is a one-size-fits-all diagnosis for anything going amiss with things Korean.

So often Koreans find themselves on the receiving end of this lesson and have come to take this analysis as a matter of fact.

Now is the time to vet this whether it is bad for us, before the life of the nation is being seriously threatened.

Was the cause of the Sewol sinking ppalli ppalli as often believed? First of all, this type of tragedy does take place all over the world. Two years prior to the Sewol disaster, an Italian cruise ship, Costa Concordia, ran aground and capsized with 4,299 on board. Eleven people died and 24 were listed as missing. However silly it may sound, the cause was its homage-paying custom of approaching an island on its route. On the night of the accident, it came too close and its hull got a gash 70 meters long. The captain beat the passengers and crew off the ship and escaped as the Sewol skipper did. In other words, ppalli ppalli alone can’t explain it. 

What about the Note 7 fiasco?

Did Samsung cut corners?  They didn’t. If they did, they could not have reached where they are: the world’s top tech firm.

Any leading firm is under pressure to get its products out ahead of its rivals. Then, the ill-fated smartphone was also lauded as a pacemaker with its variety of new functions including waterproofing and rapid recharging. Such an innovative product always carries with it unseen risks. The Note 7 was hit by the perfect storm of an eagerness to start a new generation and beat Apple, but a mechanical gremlin got the best of it. That is called risk-taking, a pivotal part in any innovative firm.



 

Samsung decided on an all-out recall as soon as the fires were reported. Would Apple take the same bold move for consumer safety? Samsung took the ppalli ppalli attitude. If it were the cause of its current troubles, then, it would be equal to attributing the demise of Nokia and Blackberry to ppalli ppalli culture.

From Korea’s perspective, it’s important to exonerate ppalli ppalli.

First, it is part of the nation’s DNA so telling Koreans to lose it is the same as telling them to stop being Korean. It is deep in the national character like patience is for the British, craftiness for the Japanese, American pragmatism, North Korean single-mindedness, Swiss sense of neutrality, etc.

We had President Lee Myung-bak, who took pragmatism as a new national character. It didn’t work.

We need more of it, not less of it.

This culture has taken us so far and we should let it take us further.

The reason why we are stuck on the slippery slope is that we are trying to imitate others’ strong points and emulate their success formulae.

Ppalli ppalli is part of our success formula. Even for our age of rapid change, it will be in a greater need. After all, we don’t have all day.

In the event that our culture proves problematic as claimed by others, we can always hire them to fix them. Meanwhile, it’s time for us to get going and get ahead with it as far as we can go.


Kpip! - Martin 2018

Offline Pecan

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2016, 02:06:48 PM »
Not mcch into name calling, but that editor has a long history of displaying his ignorance for all to see.

YoungMin

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2016, 02:13:47 PM »
What's the word for being in a hurry but driving like 5mph but still being in a hurry to cut in front of you at a junction and then driving at like 30mph in the left hand lane but then blaring the horn at you when you undertake them in the right hand lane cos it's a 60mph zone and then they start driving at like 200mph behind your bumper but they're just going to lotte mart to spend 2 hours buying the same 12 grocery items they always buy?

donovan

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2016, 02:24:18 PM »
What's the word for being in a hurry but driving like 5mph but still being in a hurry to cut in front of you at a junction and then driving at like 30mph in the left hand lane but then blaring the horn at you when you undertake them in the right hand lane cos it's a 60mph zone and then they start driving at like 200mph behind your bumper but they're just going to lotte mart to spend 2 hours buying the same 12 grocery items they always buy?

the very definition of bballi bballi

Online zola

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #4 on: October 21, 2016, 02:31:32 PM »
Not only is pali pali not a problem according to this idiot, Koreans need to increase it. Get in even more of a hurry.
I also liked his pittle dig at Japanese "craftiness".


Kpip! - Martin 2018

Offline grey

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #5 on: October 21, 2016, 03:29:56 PM »
If the Japanese are crafty, I'd like Koreans to be crafty.
Ko fills half his luggage with instant noodles for his international business travels, a lesson he learned after assuming on his first trip that three packages would suffice for six days. “Man, was I wrong. Since then, I always make sure I pack enough.”
-AP

Offline gogators!

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #6 on: October 21, 2016, 04:49:28 PM »
The leaps of logic that the writer takes makes one wonder if he was a high jumper back in the day.

Maybe he wrote it bbali bbali.

Offline lazerbullet

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #7 on: October 21, 2016, 05:35:39 PM »
The leaps of logic that the writer takes makes one wonder if he was a high jumper back in the day.

Maybe he wrote it bbali bbali.

Top post.

Online confusedsafferinkorea

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #8 on: October 21, 2016, 05:59:22 PM »
This person has got the gall to call himself an editor. Racist and illogical are adjectives that spring to mind when I read this article.
Everything is not as it seems.

No one owes you anything.... get over it.

NEVER think a failure is the end of the world, it is the beginning of a new opportunity.

There is no known medical cure for stupidity!

Offline Pecan

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #9 on: October 21, 2016, 06:34:03 PM »
This person has got the gall to call himself an editor. Racist and illogical are adjectives that spring to mind when I read this article.
You sound like Ralph Long;) verbatim.

Offline nomadicmadda

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #10 on: October 21, 2016, 06:47:57 PM »
Lol this writer is precious  :laugh:

Online confusedsafferinkorea

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #11 on: October 21, 2016, 09:58:12 PM »
This person has got the gall to call himself an editor. Racist and illogical are adjectives that spring to mind when I read this article.
You sound like Ralph Long;) verbatim.

Dang! my cover is blown.   ;D
Everything is not as it seems.

No one owes you anything.... get over it.

NEVER think a failure is the end of the world, it is the beginning of a new opportunity.

There is no known medical cure for stupidity!

Offline gogators!

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #12 on: October 22, 2016, 08:38:05 AM »
Quote
Experts have long warned that many Internet of Things devices are poorly secured -- often due to the speed at which they are brought to market.

The Switch newsletter

The day's top stories on the world of tech.

"It's important for [Internet of Things] vendors who haven't prioritized security to take this escalating series of attacks as a wake-up call," said Casey Ellis, the founder of crowd-sourcing cybersecurity firm Bugcrowd. "We're entering a period where this is very real, calculable, and painful impact to having insecure products."
Anyone who answers bbali bblai gets a lucky goldstar (LG).

Online Aristocrat

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #13 on: October 22, 2016, 02:50:52 PM »
http://m.koreatimes.co.kr/phone/news/view.jsp?req_newsidx=216513


If anything goes wrong in Korea, the “ppalli ppalli” culture is to blame.

The logic behind it is that Koreans tend to do whatever it takes to get the job done ppalli ppalli, or on the double.

When the Sewol ferry sank, this mentality or, more exactly, an extension of it in the form of cutting corners, took the blame. The big ferry took on more freight than allowed and failed to secure it properly inside the cargo bay. The result was comparable to items in an overhead locker being shifted during a turbulent flight. A top-heavy modification reduced the ship’s ability to bounce back after listing to one side and sank it. Two-hundred-ninety-five people, mostly students on a school trip, were killed with nine listed missing.

The same goes with the problem of Samsung Electronics’ Galaxy Note 7, whose production and sale have been terminated for good after some devices were reported exploding. The media and experts blame Samsung for making too much haste in launching the latest jumbo smartphone ahead of its rival Apple. The result is that they say Samsung remains clueless about the cause of the explosions

The fingers of blame are being wagged by both Koreans and foreigners. But it is not incorrect to say it was foreigners, from their third-party perspective, who first identified this weak point standing in the way of Korea’s last push to becoming a fully developed country.

Their rationale: Koreans have turned their country from the world’s most impoverished nation into one of its leading economies in a short period of time. As a result, their ability to pay attention to detail and consider safety first, traits common within developed nations, were lost in the transition.

They would tell Korea to get rid of it or remain a second-rate nation. Now, it is a one-size-fits-all diagnosis for anything going amiss with things Korean.

So often Koreans find themselves on the receiving end of this lesson and have come to take this analysis as a matter of fact.

Now is the time to vet this whether it is bad for us, before the life of the nation is being seriously threatened.

Was the cause of the Sewol sinking ppalli ppalli as often believed? First of all, this type of tragedy does take place all over the world. Two years prior to the Sewol disaster, an Italian cruise ship, Costa Concordia, ran aground and capsized with 4,299 on board. Eleven people died and 24 were listed as missing. However silly it may sound, the cause was its homage-paying custom of approaching an island on its route. On the night of the accident, it came too close and its hull got a gash 70 meters long. The captain beat the passengers and crew off the ship and escaped as the Sewol skipper did. In other words, ppalli ppalli alone can’t explain it. 

What about the Note 7 fiasco?

Did Samsung cut corners?  They didn’t. If they did, they could not have reached where they are: the world’s top tech firm.

Any leading firm is under pressure to get its products out ahead of its rivals. Then, the ill-fated smartphone was also lauded as a pacemaker with its variety of new functions including waterproofing and rapid recharging. Such an innovative product always carries with it unseen risks. The Note 7 was hit by the perfect storm of an eagerness to start a new generation and beat Apple, but a mechanical gremlin got the best of it. That is called risk-taking, a pivotal part in any innovative firm.



 

Samsung decided on an all-out recall as soon as the fires were reported. Would Apple take the same bold move for consumer safety? Samsung took the ppalli ppalli attitude. If it were the cause of its current troubles, then, it would be equal to attributing the demise of Nokia and Blackberry to ppalli ppalli culture.

From Korea’s perspective, it’s important to exonerate ppalli ppalli.

First, it is part of the nation’s DNA so telling Koreans to lose it is the same as telling them to stop being Korean. It is deep in the national character like patience is for the British, craftiness for the Japanese, American pragmatism, North Korean single-mindedness, Swiss sense of neutrality, etc.

We had President Lee Myung-bak, who took pragmatism as a new national character. It didn’t work.

We need more of it, not less of it.

This culture has taken us so far and we should let it take us further.

The reason why we are stuck on the slippery slope is that we are trying to imitate others’ strong points and emulate their success formulae.

Ppalli ppalli is part of our success formula. Even for our age of rapid change, it will be in a greater need. After all, we don’t have all day.

In the event that our culture proves problematic as claimed by others, we can always hire them to fix them. Meanwhile, it’s time for us to get going and get ahead with it as far as we can go.



Online sligo

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #14 on: October 22, 2016, 03:16:14 PM »
This begs the questions:

Who is this article aimed for?

Why is it written in English?

Who are the "We" in the article?  because it isn't anyone who is reading this.

Online oglop

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #15 on: October 22, 2016, 05:26:27 PM »
"Oh Young-jin is The Korea Times’ chief editorial writer. Contact him at foolsdie5@ktimes.com and foolsdie@gmail.com."

err

Offline grey

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #16 on: October 22, 2016, 09:37:52 PM »
Were foolsdie1-4@ktimes.com already taken?

Damn, the KT really does not like fools.
Ko fills half his luggage with instant noodles for his international business travels, a lesson he learned after assuming on his first trip that three packages would suffice for six days. “Man, was I wrong. Since then, I always make sure I pack enough.”
-AP

Offline Somebody

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #17 on: October 22, 2016, 10:06:09 PM »
빨리빨리 has some merit. It promotes not putting things off, which is good. But prioritizing this is important.
There are several examples where Koreans don't 빨리빨리. Deciding something takes hours here. Tangents are frequent. Not to mention when a phone rings, then the meeting is stopped for who knows how long. It's as if Koreans don't really care about time, for time's sake. They will spend countless hours discussing something that could be figured out in minutes. But once something is figured out and finally decided upon, it's 빨리빨리. Maybe because of the wasted time spent in discussion.
« Last Edit: October 22, 2016, 10:24:31 PM by Somebody »

Offline gogators!

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #18 on: October 23, 2016, 08:26:30 AM »
빨리빨리 has some merit. It promotes not putting things off, which is good. But prioritizing this is important.
There are several examples where Koreans don't 빨리빨리. Deciding something takes hours here. Tangents are frequent. Not to mention when a phone rings, then the meeting is stopped for who knows how long. It's as if Koreans don't really care about time, for time's sake. They will spend countless hours discussing something that could be figured out in minutes. But once something is figured out and finally decided upon, it's 빨리빨리. Maybe because of the wasted time spent in discussion.
It actually does the opposite--people wait until the last minute and then do things in a great rush. These days it begins in school with cramming for tests.

Offline nomadicmadda

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #19 on: October 24, 2016, 01:39:17 AM »
빨리빨리 has some merit. It promotes not putting things off, which is good. But prioritizing this is important.
There are several examples where Koreans don't 빨리빨리. Deciding something takes hours here. Tangents are frequent. Not to mention when a phone rings, then the meeting is stopped for who knows how long. It's as if Koreans don't really care about time, for time's sake. They will spend countless hours discussing something that could be figured out in minutes. But once something is figured out and finally decided upon, it's 빨리빨리. Maybe because of the wasted time spent in discussion.

I actually find 빨리빨리 has more to do with the image and appearance of being busy than actual productivity.  It's why corners are cut and why, as you pointed out, when you look at how efficiently time is actually being used...you find it simply isn't :lipsrsealed: