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Author Topic: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli  (Read 7387 times)

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #20 on: October 23, 2016, 08:26:30 AM »
빨리빨리 has some merit. It promotes not putting things off, which is good. But prioritizing this is important.
There are several examples where Koreans don't 빨리빨리. Deciding something takes hours here. Tangents are frequent. Not to mention when a phone rings, then the meeting is stopped for who knows how long. It's as if Koreans don't really care about time, for time's sake. They will spend countless hours discussing something that could be figured out in minutes. But once something is figured out and finally decided upon, it's 빨리빨리. Maybe because of the wasted time spent in discussion.
It actually does the opposite--people wait until the last minute and then do things in a great rush. These days it begins in school with cramming for tests.

Offline nomadicmadda

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #21 on: October 24, 2016, 01:39:17 AM »
빨리빨리 has some merit. It promotes not putting things off, which is good. But prioritizing this is important.
There are several examples where Koreans don't 빨리빨리. Deciding something takes hours here. Tangents are frequent. Not to mention when a phone rings, then the meeting is stopped for who knows how long. It's as if Koreans don't really care about time, for time's sake. They will spend countless hours discussing something that could be figured out in minutes. But once something is figured out and finally decided upon, it's 빨리빨리. Maybe because of the wasted time spent in discussion.

I actually find 빨리빨리 has more to do with the image and appearance of being busy than actual productivity.  It's why corners are cut and why, as you pointed out, when you look at how efficiently time is actually being used...you find it simply isn't :lipsrsealed:

Offline HyooMyron

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #22 on: October 24, 2016, 08:52:33 AM »
This begs the questions:

Who is this article aimed for?

Why is it written in English?

Who are the "We" in the article?  because it isn't anyone who is reading this.

Is it not that obvious that we are gettin trolled? Look at all the other stuff that person has wrote. It's just all a bunch of buzz words to get us riled up. And it works every single time! We just give this guy free views and publicity for trolling us, while he sits back and laughs.

Offline Dave Stepz

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #23 on: October 24, 2016, 09:47:05 AM »
Bbali bbali.....

-pressured into trying for a baby pretty much on your honeymoon.  Leaving no real 'quality married' time after you get married to get used to each other, before the father is expected to earn stacks of cash and work all the time.  Then the kids come and you have no time together because you have to pay for hagwons and extra classes.  Followed by divorce.   

Offline oli125

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #24 on: October 24, 2016, 09:49:35 AM »
Back to those who mentioned about shoddy construction. last year we bought a new build apartment. It was Lotte Castle, which I believe is considered to be one of the better construction companies. It was not the biggest apartment complex- only 623 apartments, which were completed in under 2 years. 623 homes in under 2 years- that's pretty impressive. Anyways, a month before the complex officially "opened" the owners had a day to go and check for any errors in their apartment. Oh my...it was disappointing. To mention just a few issues: cracked grout, windows and doors that didn't open or close, wall paper hanging off, flooring uneven, work surfaces uneven. Now I don't necessarily blame the workers for this as they are probably ordered to work at break- neck speed, after all 623 apartments in under 2 years is pretty impressive. However, I don't understand why a little more time, care and consideration wasn't taken. In the end we sold the apartment before we even moved in.

Online Mr.DeMartino

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #25 on: October 24, 2016, 09:51:53 AM »
With things like guns or bballi bballi, they can be strange in that if a culture didn't have them, in some alternate universe things could be completely different and not necessarily for the better.

Maybe without them, Korea is like the Philippines or something. Maybe without guns, America succumbed to some dumb Red Dawn invasion (not bloody likely, but spitballing here). There's something to be said for having to deal with a potential guerrilla force of 300 million. Maybe if Saudi Arabia didn't chop the hands off of thieves, they'd have a rampant crime problem.   

Offline macteacher

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #26 on: October 24, 2016, 10:10:25 AM »
"First, it is part of the nation’s DNA so telling Koreans to lose it is the same as telling them to stop being Korean."

Haha, this reminds me of when I asked my Korean friend if he hated being told ppali ppalli. He told me "I'm Korean, how could I hate that?" and my response was to remind him just last week that he told me harsh deadlines and being told to rush gives him major anxiety and makes him sweat into a puddle at his desk. He was like "Oh, right. I guess that's true."


But I hate this attitude so much that a country's identity is based on perpetuating the same stereotypes for eternity. It's so prevalent in Korea and it reminds me of idiots back home who don't want the government to take their guns because the right to bear arms is what makes us American!!! Many Korean people will say America needs to change gun culture even if it has been with us for a long time, but they can't see their own need to change.

It's like they don't give an actual f*ck about their fellow country people who are being hurt by toxic cultural mindsets. If you put culture before the actual people, it doesn't really seem like you care about what actually makes a country great (the people living there!!!)


it's buzzwords. during pre-korean war korea, most 1st person accounts of Korea talk about how their encounters with Koreans left an impression of listlessness and peaceful laziness (not in a negative way). this ppalli ppalli "culture" was birthed during the dictatorships here as a way to whip people into laying the groundwork to an economic juggernaut under the disguise of some innate cultural trait. it's a constructed ideology that can be done away like most things in the world. 

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #27 on: October 24, 2016, 10:12:29 AM »
"First, it is part of the nation’s DNA so telling Koreans to lose it is the same as telling them to stop being Korean."

Haha, this reminds me of when I asked my Korean friend if he hated being told ppali ppalli. He told me "I'm Korean, how could I hate that?" and my response was to remind him just last week that he told me harsh deadlines and being told to rush gives him major anxiety and makes him sweat into a puddle at his desk. He was like "Oh, right. I guess that's true."


But I hate this attitude so much that a country's identity is based on perpetuating the same stereotypes for eternity. It's so prevalent in Korea and it reminds me of idiots back home who don't want the government to take their guns because the right to bear arms is what makes us American!!! Many Korean people will say America needs to change gun culture even if it has been with us for a long time, but they can't see their own need to change.

It's like they don't give an actual f*ck about their fellow country people who are being hurt by toxic cultural mindsets. If you put culture before the actual people, it doesn't really seem like you care about what actually makes a country great (the people living there!!!)


it's buzzwords. during pre-korean war korea, most 1st person accounts of Korea talk about how their encounters with Koreans left an impression of listlessness and peaceful laziness (not in a negative way). this ppalli ppalli "culture" was birthed during the dictatorships here as a way to whip people into laying the groundwork to an economic juggernaut under the disguise of some innate cultural trait. it's a constructed ideology that can be done away like most things in the world.

Has its virtues when say, another country wants to invade you and industrial might could be the difference between victory and defeat.

Not that any of that would apply to Korea mind you.

Offline macteacher

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #28 on: October 24, 2016, 10:26:33 AM »
"First, it is part of the nation’s DNA so telling Koreans to lose it is the same as telling them to stop being Korean."

Haha, this reminds me of when I asked my Korean friend if he hated being told ppali ppalli. He told me "I'm Korean, how could I hate that?" and my response was to remind him just last week that he told me harsh deadlines and being told to rush gives him major anxiety and makes him sweat into a puddle at his desk. He was like "Oh, right. I guess that's true."


But I hate this attitude so much that a country's identity is based on perpetuating the same stereotypes for eternity. It's so prevalent in Korea and it reminds me of idiots back home who don't want the government to take their guns because the right to bear arms is what makes us American!!! Many Korean people will say America needs to change gun culture even if it has been with us for a long time, but they can't see their own need to change.

It's like they don't give an actual f*ck about their fellow country people who are being hurt by toxic cultural mindsets. If you put culture before the actual people, it doesn't really seem like you care about what actually makes a country great (the people living there!!!)


it's buzzwords. during pre-korean war korea, most 1st person accounts of Korea talk about how their encounters with Koreans left an impression of listlessness and peaceful laziness (not in a negative way). this ppalli ppalli "culture" was birthed during the dictatorships here as a way to whip people into laying the groundwork to an economic juggernaut under the disguise of some innate cultural trait. it's a constructed ideology that can be done away like most things in the world.

Has its virtues when say, another country wants to invade you and industrial might could be the difference between victory and defeat.

Not that any of that would apply to Korea mind you.

never said it didn't have its virtues. ppalli ppalli isn't some mystic korean thing. when people criticize ppalli ppalli, they're usually using it as a portmanteau for the top down/nepotism/bribing bureaucracy that is pervasive in a lot of the culture here. it's a complicated topic. Korea is going to have look inwards and think about their managerial style as their population shrinks and they move to more service industries.

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #29 on: October 24, 2016, 10:34:46 AM »
When people criticize ppalli ppalli, they're usually using it as a portmanteau for the top down/nepotism/bribing bureaucracy that is pervasive in a lot of the culture here.

??

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #30 on: October 24, 2016, 10:36:02 AM »
When people criticize ppalli ppalli, they're usually using it as a portmanteau for the top down/nepotism/bribing bureaucracy that is pervasive in a lot of the culture here.

??

ahahahaha 바보

Online donovan

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #31 on: October 24, 2016, 10:42:43 AM »
When people criticize ppalli ppalli, they're usually using it as a portmanteau for the top down/nepotism/bribing bureaucracy that is pervasive in a lot of the culture here.

??

ahahahaha 바보

Would there be a word for that, though? What would it be? Euphemism?

Offline macteacher

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #32 on: October 24, 2016, 11:23:51 AM »
"You see it's like a portmanteau—there are two meanings packed up into one word."


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portmanteau

it's used in this way sometimes  :undecided:

Online donovan

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #33 on: October 24, 2016, 11:37:55 AM »
"You see it's like a portmanteau—there are two meanings packed up into one word."


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portmanteau

it's used in this way sometimes  :undecided:

Is that so? I always thought it was more two words packed into one meaning. Can it be called a portmanteau if it doesn't borrow phones from two different words and combine them into one? It seems to me like that "Through the Looking Glass" quote is a little off. Or 빨리 빨리 is a combination of two different words?

Anyway, not sure what the two meanings would be in this case.

Offline macteacher

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #34 on: October 24, 2016, 11:46:54 AM »
"You see it's like a portmanteau—there are two meanings packed up into one word."


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portmanteau

it's used in this way sometimes  :undecided:

Is that so? I always thought it was more two words packed into one meaning. Can it be called a portmanteau if it doesn't borrow phones from two different words and combine them into one? It seems to me like that "Through the Looking Glass" quote is a little off. Or 빨리 빨리 is a combination of two different words?

Anyway, not sure what the two meanings would be in this case.

i mean i don't know what you want me to say. it's often used for things like "brunch" (breakfast lunch) but it's sometimes used more poetically to say something as one word carrying (port) more than one meaning ie ppalli palli being used to talk about the quickness of korea but often it has more to do with top-down management.

but nice epic pwn with that picture

Online donovan

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #35 on: October 24, 2016, 11:59:29 AM »
"You see it's like a portmanteau—there are two meanings packed up into one word."


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portmanteau

it's used in this way sometimes  :undecided:

Is that so? I always thought it was more two words packed into one meaning. Can it be called a portmanteau if it doesn't borrow phones from two different words and combine them into one? It seems to me like that "Through the Looking Glass" quote is a little off. Or 빨리 빨리 is a combination of two different words?

Anyway, not sure what the two meanings would be in this case.

i mean i don't know what you want me to say. it's often used for things like "brunch" (breakfast lunch) but it's sometimes used more poetically to say something as one word carrying (port) more than one meaning ie ppalli palli being used to talk about the quickness of korea but often it has more to do with top-down management.

but nice epic pwn with that picture

I see. I guess I can't really question the wording of Lewis Carroll's definition as he's the one who created the word in the first place! (Thanks, Wikipedia)

Offline gideonvasquez

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #36 on: October 24, 2016, 12:02:44 PM »
"You see it's like a portmanteau—there are two meanings packed up into one word."


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portmanteau

it's used in this way sometimes  :undecided:

Is that so? I always thought it was more two words packed into one meaning. Can it be called a portmanteau if it doesn't borrow phones from two different words and combine them into one? It seems to me like that "Through the Looking Glass" quote is a little off. Or 빨리 빨리 is a combination of two different words?

Anyway, not sure what the two meanings would be in this case.

i mean i don't know what you want me to say. it's often used for things like "brunch" (breakfast lunch) but it's sometimes used more poetically to say something as one word carrying (port) more than one meaning ie ppalli palli being used to talk about the quickness of korea but often it has more to do with top-down management.

but nice epic pwn with that picture
I've never seen that usage before. Do you have an example? I have only heard of a portmanteau carrying the meaning of the two contributing morphemes. Like hungry and angry making hangry. Or Bill and Hillary making Billary.

Online MayorHaggar

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #37 on: October 25, 2016, 03:39:20 PM »
Article summary:

- "We're not bballi-bballi, YOU'RE bballi-bballi!" (Well, specifically Italy, the Korea of Europe) Therefore anything bad that Koreans do is OK because people do bad stuff in other countries.

- "Bballi-bballi is part of Korean culture, so if you ask us to stop killing people in preventable ferry accidents, we will stop being Korean"

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #38 on: October 25, 2016, 08:13:17 PM »
Article summary:

- "We're not bballi-bballi, YOU'RE bballi-bballi!" (Well, specifically Italy, the Korea of Europe) Therefore anything bad that Koreans do is OK because people do bad stuff in other countries.

- "Bballi-bballi is part of Korean culture, so if you ask us to stop killing people in preventable ferry accidents, we will stop being Korean"
More concise: "This is Korea!"

Offline Somebody

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Re: Foreign myths about 'ppalli ppalli
« Reply #39 on: October 26, 2016, 12:47:15 AM »
빨리빨리 has some merit. It promotes not putting things off, which is good. But prioritizing this is important.
There are several examples where Koreans don't 빨리빨리. Deciding something takes hours here. Tangents are frequent. Not to mention when a phone rings, then the meeting is stopped for who knows how long. It's as if Koreans don't really care about time, for time's sake. They will spend countless hours discussing something that could be figured out in minutes. But once something is figured out and finally decided upon, it's 빨리빨리. Maybe because of the wasted time spent in discussion.

I actually find 빨리빨리 has more to do with the image and appearance of being busy than actual productivity.  It's why corners are cut and why, as you pointed out, when you look at how efficiently time is actually being used...you find it simply isn't :lipsrsealed:

That is true in places like companies or schools. But for construction, it's the opposite. These guys put up buildings faster than I've ever seen. I used to be a real estate appraiser in the states, and I am astonished how quickly buildings are put up or existing structures are renovated. The work they have done in the west part of Suwon is incredible. Of course, the work isn't up to American standards. I've seen many apartment paint jobs that American companies would get sued for. But somehow, it doesn't matter to Koreans. Their houses, which are actually condo or apartment units, are not permanent places of residence. They will move a lot. Everything is temporary. So, interior decoraters are not the perfectionists they are in the states.
I haven't seen any structural problems, but walls here let through sound a lot. I don't know how insulation is used here. But even in the states, you have to soundproof by spending money. What my long and boring post is trying to say is that Korean blue collar workers are not staying at work extra hours to look good.