June 20, 2018, 12:18:12 AM

Author Topic: Unnecessary Korean jobs  (Read 1418 times)

Online Cyanea

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Unnecessary Korean jobs
« on: May 08, 2018, 09:32:31 AM »
Why is a man with a baton directing me when to cross the pedestrian crossing? The traffic lights are working fine and I can see the signal well enough.

Its almost as unwarranted as the guy in white gloves directing people to drive up the multi-storey car park.

Does the taxpayer actually foot the bil for all these make-work jobs?

« Last Edit: May 08, 2018, 09:36:11 AM by Cyanea »
Catch my drift?

Online zola

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Re: Unnecessary Korean jobs
« Reply #1 on: May 08, 2018, 09:49:31 AM »
You mean outside schools? I think those guys are kind of necessary. But yes Korea, not unlike Japan is a nation of Jobsworths. Ever been into Hi-mart on a weekday. There are like 15 staff standing around doing nothing. That would be too many even for the busiest days.
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Online Aristocrat

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Re: Unnecessary Korean jobs
« Reply #2 on: May 08, 2018, 10:15:40 AM »
Why is a man with a baton directing me when to cross the pedestrian crossing? The traffic lights are working fine and I can see the signal well enough.

Its almost as unwarranted as the guy in white gloves directing people to drive up the multi-storey car park.

Does the taxpayer actually foot the bil for all these make-work jobs?

Some of these guys take pride in their work and others simply couldn't care less. One guy, at the four way stop, helps kids cross the road. I could see a kid getting knocked over every other day without this guy.

However, at my school there's a guy who just lazily waves the thing around, doesn't do a damn thing, lets parents park in the disabled zone, almost causes accidents etc.

Basically, it's mainly to give the elderly something to do and a sense of purpose.

Online oglop

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Re: Unnecessary Korean jobs
« Reply #3 on: May 08, 2018, 10:46:58 AM »
Why is a man with a baton directing me when to cross the pedestrian crossing? The traffic lights are working fine and I can see the signal well enough.

Its almost as unwarranted as the guy in white gloves directing people to drive up the multi-storey car park.

Does the taxpayer actually foot the bil for all these make-work jobs?
yeah weird, isn't it. the 'greeter' at emart is another.

everyone ignores those baton guys anyway. having said that, i never see policeman deal with drivers who break the law right in front of them, so...

Online JNM

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Re: Unnecessary Korean jobs
« Reply #4 on: May 08, 2018, 10:50:56 AM »
A Korean-American friend of mine told me that some of the “traffic directors” are cabbies working off fines.

Offline Mr.DeMartino

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Re: Unnecessary Korean jobs
« Reply #5 on: May 08, 2018, 11:17:59 AM »
A Korean-American friend of mine told me that some of the “traffic directors” are cabbies working off fines.

That's indeed some of it, which I think is actually a pretty good idea when it comes to rehabilitation/alternative punishment for lower-income individuals and is rather progressive.

As for the Hi-Mart greeters, no they aren't subsidized by the government. There is a difference between how corporations and companies are regarded here vs. back home. There is a much stronger belief that corporations are part of the social contract. They have an obligation towards welfare and society and that is why they are also granted tremendous power. That is why these companies hire these "pointless" workers.

There is also a significant difference in regard to age and work (although not THAT big). Presently, we view old age as retirement and in many cases this has led to little more than shoving people into senior centers and waiting for them to die while sitting around watching TV. The relative ableness and activity of the elderly in Korea is a good thing and this is also shown in people working. Time and time again it has been demonstrated that a sense of purpose and regular work has tremendous health benefits, both mental and physical, for the elderly. It is also important for their sense of self-respect that they can still produce and contribute.

So maybe you think it's "dumb" and "pointless", but I disagree. I think it's one of the things they really have gotten right here. Now, there are plenty of exceptions and flaws within this, but the overall philosophy is good. 

Online JNM

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Re: Unnecessary Korean jobs
« Reply #6 on: May 08, 2018, 11:43:15 AM »
A Korean-American friend of mine told me that some of the “traffic directors” are cabbies working off fines.

That's indeed some of it, which I think is actually a pretty good idea when it comes to rehabilitation/alternative punishment for lower-income individuals and is rather progressive.
...

There have been a few cases in the US news about poor people being unable to pay minor fines (traffic tickets, etc) and being put in jail for contempt of court. This leads to loss of jobs, kids put into the foster system, and all that comes with that.

I chuckle, though, when it is clear that the “Best Driver” vest is just cruel sarcasm.
« Last Edit: May 08, 2018, 11:55:02 AM by JNM »

Online oglop

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Re: Unnecessary Korean jobs
« Reply #7 on: May 08, 2018, 11:43:50 AM »
i'd imagine most old people work because they don't receive enough pension money to live on, rather than a 'sense of purpose'.

my mother in law works at a fried chicken restaurant, and father in law as an overnight security guard. both are an retirement age. neither works because they like it, but rather they need the money

Offline Mr C

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Re: Unnecessary Korean jobs
« Reply #8 on: May 08, 2018, 12:05:33 PM »
Why is a man with a baton directing me when to cross the pedestrian crossing? The traffic lights are working fine and I can see the signal well enough.

Its almost as unwarranted as the guy in white gloves directing people to drive up the multi-storey car park.

Does the taxpayer actually foot the bil for all these make-work jobs?
yeah weird, isn't it. the 'greeter' at emart is another.

Greeters have a big impact on decreasing what those in the trade call "shrinkage", which means loss due to shoplifting.

Offline Mr C

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Re: Unnecessary Korean jobs
« Reply #9 on: May 08, 2018, 12:21:51 PM »
A Korean-American friend of mine told me that some of the “traffic directors” are cabbies working off fines.

That's indeed some of it, which I think is actually a pretty good idea when it comes to rehabilitation/alternative punishment for lower-income individuals and is rather progressive.
...

There have been a few cases in the US news about poor people being unable to pay minor fines (traffic tickets, etc) and being put in jail for contempt of court. This leads to loss of jobs, kids put into the foster system, and all that comes with that.
"A few cases."  Well, maybe in the news, but this happens to thousands and thousands of people each year, no one quite knows how many.  Not necessarily jailed for contempt, but unable to pay the storage fee on tthe towed car, for example.

Online thunderlips

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Re: Unnecessary Korean jobs
« Reply #10 on: May 08, 2018, 02:26:24 PM »
A Korean-American friend of mine told me that some of the “traffic directors” are cabbies working off fines.

That's indeed some of it, which I think is actually a pretty good idea when it comes to rehabilitation/alternative punishment for lower-income individuals and is rather progressive.

As for the Hi-Mart greeters, no they aren't subsidized by the government. There is a difference between how corporations and companies are regarded here vs. back home. There is a much stronger belief that corporations are part of the social contract. They have an obligation towards welfare and society and that is why they are also granted tremendous power. That is why these companies hire these "pointless" workers.

There is also a significant difference in regard to age and work (although not THAT big). Presently, we view old age as retirement and in many cases this has led to little more than shoving people into senior centers and waiting for them to die while sitting around watching TV. The relative ableness and activity of the elderly in Korea is a good thing and this is also shown in people working. Time and time again it has been demonstrated that a sense of purpose and regular work has tremendous health benefits, both mental and physical, for the elderly. It is also important for their sense of self-respect that they can still produce and contribute.

So maybe you think it's "dumb" and "pointless", but I disagree. I think it's one of the things they really have gotten right here. Now, there are plenty of exceptions and flaws within this, but the overall philosophy is good.

Wow enlightening. I never realized the benevolence of the cardboard recycling conglomerate here.  Much better than any type of social security scam system.

Shining!!!

Online Savant

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Re: Unnecessary Korean jobs
« Reply #11 on: May 08, 2018, 02:58:00 PM »
A Korean-American friend of mine told me that some of the “traffic directors” are cabbies working off fines.

That's indeed some of it, which I think is actually a pretty good idea when it comes to rehabilitation/alternative punishment for lower-income individuals and is rather progressive.

As for the Hi-Mart greeters, no they aren't subsidized by the government. There is a difference between how corporations and companies are regarded here vs. back home. There is a much stronger belief that corporations are part of the social contract. They have an obligation towards welfare and society and that is why they are also granted tremendous power. That is why these companies hire these "pointless" workers.

There is also a significant difference in regard to age and work (although not THAT big). Presently, we view old age as retirement and in many cases this has led to little more than shoving people into senior centers and waiting for them to die while sitting around watching TV. The relative ableness and activity of the elderly in Korea is a good thing and this is also shown in people working. Time and time again it has been demonstrated that a sense of purpose and regular work has tremendous health benefits, both mental and physical, for the elderly. It is also important for their sense of self-respect that they can still produce and contribute.

So maybe you think it's "dumb" and "pointless", but I disagree. I think it's one of the things they really have gotten right here. Now, there are plenty of exceptions and flaws within this, but the overall philosophy is good.

Wow enlightening. I never realized the benevolence of the cardboard recycling conglomerate here.  Much better than any type of social security scam system.

Shining!!!

Those old Koreans pushing their cardboard carts on busy roads slowing down traffic are just doubling up as road safety monitors.

Offline Mr.DeMartino

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Re: Unnecessary Korean jobs
« Reply #12 on: May 08, 2018, 03:11:37 PM »
A Korean-American friend of mine told me that some of the “traffic directors” are cabbies working off fines.

That's indeed some of it, which I think is actually a pretty good idea when it comes to rehabilitation/alternative punishment for lower-income individuals and is rather progressive.

As for the Hi-Mart greeters, no they aren't subsidized by the government. There is a difference between how corporations and companies are regarded here vs. back home. There is a much stronger belief that corporations are part of the social contract. They have an obligation towards welfare and society and that is why they are also granted tremendous power. That is why these companies hire these "pointless" workers.

There is also a significant difference in regard to age and work (although not THAT big). Presently, we view old age as retirement and in many cases this has led to little more than shoving people into senior centers and waiting for them to die while sitting around watching TV. The relative ableness and activity of the elderly in Korea is a good thing and this is also shown in people working. Time and time again it has been demonstrated that a sense of purpose and regular work has tremendous health benefits, both mental and physical, for the elderly. It is also important for their sense of self-respect that they can still produce and contribute.

So maybe you think it's "dumb" and "pointless", but I disagree. I think it's one of the things they really have gotten right here. Now, there are plenty of exceptions and flaws within this, but the overall philosophy is good.

Wow enlightening. I never realized the benevolence of the cardboard recycling conglomerate here.  Much better than any type of social security scam system.

Shining!!!

That was in reference to the store greeters and other "pointless" employees, not someone selling cardboard. Completely missed the point.

If Lotte or whoever were to can them all, the people would focus on the layoffs of people.

I seriously think some people here just don't get it when it comes to East Asia (or U.S. Great Depression generation) and work ethic.

Offline AWVM_HXE

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Re: Unnecessary Korean jobs
« Reply #13 on: May 08, 2018, 04:15:05 PM »
I don't understand why I can't make copies for class without 350 forms signed in triplicate, a two-day waiting period, and apparently some sort of background check. And then I'm not allowed to touch the be-damned copier!

In China, I wasn't even allowed into the copier room...

Online ESLTurtle

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Re: Unnecessary Korean jobs
« Reply #14 on: May 08, 2018, 04:44:44 PM »
All this going on while I be deskwarming chattin' up my next date.  :afro:

Online Cyanea

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Re: Unnecessary Korean jobs
« Reply #15 on: May 08, 2018, 05:58:35 PM »
That was in reference to the store greeters and other "pointless" employees

If you're going to create jobs for the sake of it why not make them do something useful??

There is picking up the litter in the countryside, for one. The sheer amount of trash blowing around the mountain in my district is off the chart. Or all the plastic along the beaches.

Catch my drift?

Online thunderlips

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Re: Unnecessary Korean jobs
« Reply #16 on: May 09, 2018, 08:00:14 AM »
A Korean-American friend of mine told me that some of the “traffic directors” are cabbies working off fines.

That's indeed some of it, which I think is actually a pretty good idea when it comes to rehabilitation/alternative punishment for lower-income individuals and is rather progressive.

As for the Hi-Mart greeters, no they aren't subsidized by the government. There is a difference between how corporations and companies are regarded here vs. back home. There is a much stronger belief that corporations are part of the social contract. They have an obligation towards welfare and society and that is why they are also granted tremendous power. That is why these companies hire these "pointless" workers.

There is also a significant difference in regard to age and work (although not THAT big). Presently, we view old age as retirement and in many cases this has led to little more than shoving people into senior centers and waiting for them to die while sitting around watching TV. The relative ableness and activity of the elderly in Korea is a good thing and this is also shown in people working. Time and time again it has been demonstrated that a sense of purpose and regular work has tremendous health benefits, both mental and physical, for the elderly. It is also important for their sense of self-respect that they can still produce and contribute.

So maybe you think it's "dumb" and "pointless", but I disagree. I think it's one of the things they really have gotten right here. Now, there are plenty of exceptions and flaws within this, but the overall philosophy is good.

Wow enlightening. I never realized the benevolence of the cardboard recycling conglomerate here.  Much better than any type of social security scam system.

Shining!!!

That was in reference to the store greeters and other "pointless" employees, not someone selling cardboard. Completely missed the point.

If Lotte or whoever were to can them all, the people would focus on the layoffs of people.

I seriously think some people here just don't get it when it comes to East Asia (or U.S. Great Depression generation) and work ethic.

Fair enough. I actually agree, as does science, about the need for the elderly (everyone really) to keep busy, purposeful lives. I do think there is a problem with many employees forced out of jobs, usually in the industrial sector,  due to their age. I do think there needs to be better protections for employees to not be systematically moved to high paying skill jobs into low paying low skill jobs.

Offline MayorHaggar

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Re: Unnecessary Korean jobs
« Reply #17 on: May 09, 2018, 09:59:09 AM »
When living in Korea I was always amazed at how shops and restaurants would be so full of workers standing around doing nothing, or trying to appear busy yet being completely useless. Not all places, some would have a good system, but I always hated going to a new restaurant because they'd always have a bunch of useless staff.


A Korean-American friend of mine told me that some of the “traffic directors” are cabbies working off fines.

That's indeed some of it, which I think is actually a pretty good idea when it comes to rehabilitation/alternative punishment for lower-income individuals and is rather progressive.

As for the Hi-Mart greeters, no they aren't subsidized by the government. There is a difference between how corporations and companies are regarded here vs. back home. There is a much stronger belief that corporations are part of the social contract. They have an obligation towards welfare and society and that is why they are also granted tremendous power. That is why these companies hire these "pointless" workers.

There is also a significant difference in regard to age and work (although not THAT big). Presently, we view old age as retirement and in many cases this has led to little more than shoving people into senior centers and waiting for them to die while sitting around watching TV. The relative ableness and activity of the elderly in Korea is a good thing and this is also shown in people working. Time and time again it has been demonstrated that a sense of purpose and regular work has tremendous health benefits, both mental and physical, for the elderly. It is also important for their sense of self-respect that they can still produce and contribute.

So maybe you think it's "dumb" and "pointless", but I disagree. I think it's one of the things they really have gotten right here. Now, there are plenty of exceptions and flaws within this, but the overall philosophy is good.

Wow enlightening. I never realized the benevolence of the cardboard recycling conglomerate here.  Much better than any type of social security scam system.

Shining!!!

That was in reference to the store greeters and other "pointless" employees, not someone selling cardboard. Completely missed the point.

If Lotte or whoever were to can them all, the people would focus on the layoffs of people.

I seriously think some people here just don't get it when it comes to East Asia (or U.S. Great Depression generation) and work ethic.

The work ethic where Koreans sleep all day at their desk, "work" long hours and have painfully low productivity statistics?

And what part of "the corporations take care of their workers" jives with the fact that almost all Korean employers fire their employees around the time they turn 45?

I realize you're just posting bullshit as usual but anyone who parrots lies about "the amazing Korean work ethic" or "Korean employers take care of their staff" really needs to lay off the kool-aid.

Offline Mr.DeMartino

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Re: Unnecessary Korean jobs
« Reply #18 on: May 09, 2018, 10:36:25 AM »
If you're going to create jobs for the sake of it why not make them do something useful??

There is picking up the litter in the countryside, for one. The sheer amount of trash blowing around the mountain in my district is off the chart. Or all the plastic along the beaches.
The government does hire some old people to pick up trash around the streets, in case you haven't noticed. But we're talking primarily about corporations here. In this case, they're used as store greeters, product demonstrators, and other tasks.

The work ethic where Koreans sleep all day at their desk, "work" long hours and have painfully low productivity statistics?

And what part of "the corporations take care of their workers" jives with the fact that almost all Korean employers fire their employees around the time they turn 45?

I realize you're just posting bullshit as usual but anyone who parrots lies about "the amazing Korean work ethic" or "Korean employers take care of their staff" really needs to lay off the kool-aid.
There's office loafers who are just passing along papers. There's also A LOT of people working really long hours and I do mean working.

I didn't say that corporations take care of their workers. I said that there is a social contract between the public and corporations that is different than how we view our corporations. The corporation is seen as having greater responsibility towards society (hence why it is conferred greater influence and power). Corporations hire these people as gestures towards that responsibility.

Note that I didn't say that this was altruistic in any way, I simply said it was done in that context. In fact, I would say, and I think you would agree, that hiring such people is often a cynical tactic and is relatively low cost to the public support they gain. However, that doesn't mean the idea is wholly without merit. In a capitalist society where we do grant significant power and status to our corporations, they in turn should have increasing responsibility to exercise their corporate influence towards the people who grant them power.

Offline AvecPommesFrites

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Re: Unnecessary Korean jobs
« Reply #19 on: May 09, 2018, 10:47:57 AM »
Haha. Gotta love DeMartino. He can turn a spin on anything into a pro Korea stance.  :laugh:

Here's your 0 hours contract that comes with no guarantee of work and without all the benefits of a fixed hours contract. You will be paid minimum wage.  Please be ready to work whenever I request or you will be let go and replaced by another 47 year old woman who is desperate to fill the lack of income void in her family's finances since being fired by the bank for being too old. Remember to badger the customers until they purchase a 700% marked up box set of tooth paste or spam.

I'd like to add the traffic wardens in my city who roam the streets doing anything other than policing traffic.


« Last Edit: May 09, 2018, 10:50:28 AM by AvecPommesFrites »
waygook.org user #nugunugu... OMG avec's picked up a steelchair! God almighty it's a steelchair to the skull. Good god. BANG. ANOTHER shot to the Cranium!