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Author Topic: F2-7 Visa: A Question (and a Resource)  (Read 3666 times)

Offline rizwan.qamar

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Re: F2-7 Visa: A Question (and a Resource)
« Reply #20 on: May 03, 2018, 03:53:15 PM »
@PaulineMacLeod: No, they asked for some additional documents which I provided last week, however, I have not received any result yet.

Offline PaulineMacLeod

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Re: F2-7 Visa: A Question (and a Resource)
« Reply #21 on: May 03, 2018, 04:09:46 PM »
Dear rizwan,

It would seem that your application is still alive, then. At least they gave you the courtesy of asking you for more documents instead of just rejecting you---

Offline alexkorea

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Re: F2-7 Visa: A Question (and a Resource)
« Reply #22 on: May 17, 2018, 03:38:04 PM »

Offline PaulineMacLeod

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Re: F2-7 Visa: A Question (and a Resource)
« Reply #23 on: May 18, 2018, 12:33:56 AM »
Anyone with a spreadsheet, a calculator, or the toggle buttons of a "Visa Expert dot CO dot KR" website can punch in a bunch of numbers and calculate how many points (s)he might have. The immigration update of July 20, 2015 relating to this visa allows this to happen.

Unfortunately, the whole business of calculating is not really helpful at all. Immigration decides what documents to accept or reject in the determination of an F2-7 candidacy. You could go to the "Visa Expert dot CO dot KR" website and punch in all the toggle buttons you like, but this website won't tell you if you actually will receive the points at the immigration office (and ultimately at the upper immigration officers who ultimately make the final decision).

I guess this suggested website would only help you if you were willing to actually show the documents to this website's management (probably for a fee? I didn't read the website closely, so I apologise in advance for assuming wrongly) and have them facilitate the procedure for you.

Online cheolsu

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Re: F2-7 Visa: A Question (and a Resource)
« Reply #24 on: September 04, 2018, 12:16:39 PM »
I'm bumping this up to report on my recent experience applying for the F2. I had the following documents:

- Application form with photo attached, as you get a new ARC
- Copies of original degrees (BA and MA)
- TOPIK result certificate
- 고용계약서 (Employee Contract)
- 재직증명서 (proof of employment)
- 원천징수영수증 / 갑종근로 소득에 대한 소득세 원천 징수 확인서 (proof of income and tax), from my employer
- Housing contract

My points division:
25 points for age
30 points for education
20 points for language ability (TOPIK level 6)
5+ points for income and tax paid

The immigration officer took out a sheet to calculate the points in front of me and circled the value for each one. The visa costs 100,000 won, plus 30,000 won, and the processing time is 3-4 weeks. The officer confirmed on the spot, though, that I will be receiving the F2.
« Last Edit: September 04, 2018, 12:18:21 PM by cheolsu »

Online TexasChicken

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Re: F2-7 Visa: A Question (and a Resource)
« Reply #25 on: September 04, 2018, 12:29:08 PM »
Congratulations Cheolsu welcome to the F visa club may your private lessons be legal and glorious!

Online robin_teacher

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Re: F2-7 Visa: A Question (and a Resource)
« Reply #26 on: September 04, 2018, 03:12:15 PM »

The immigration officer took out a sheet to calculate the points in front of me and circled the value for each one. The visa costs 100,000 won, plus 30,000 won, and the processing time is 3-4 weeks. The officer confirmed on the spot, though, that I will be receiving the F2.

Congratulations!  ;D And thanks for providing the list of documents. I plan on going for it next year and it's very helpful to hear from others who have completed the process.

Online cheolsu

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Re: F2-7 Visa: A Question (and a Resource)
« Reply #27 on: September 04, 2018, 03:37:00 PM »
Thanks, guys. I think my experience was easier because the points involved, such as income or TOPIK, were very black-and-white by their nature and because they were sourced in Korea.

People relying on things like overseas work experience or needing income or taxes to be counted in a certain way or over a certain time period will have more issues. I don't think that immigration is very forgiving in giving this visa out.

Online gotngoidea

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Re: F2-7 Visa: A Question (and a Resource)
« Reply #28 on: September 05, 2018, 12:02:25 PM »
I'm bumping this up to report on my recent experience applying for the F2. I had the following documents:

- Application form with photo attached, as you get a new ARC
- Copies of original degrees (BA and MA)
- TOPIK result certificate
- 고용계약서 (Employee Contract)
- 재직증명서 (proof of employment)
- 원천징수영수증 / 갑종근로 소득에 대한 소득세 원천 징수 확인서 (proof of income and tax), from my employer
- Housing contract


I just recently renewed my E-2 visa (last week). Would I have to get my contract and proof of employment again from my employer and submit it along with these documents?

Online cheolsu

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Re: F2-7 Visa: A Question (and a Resource)
« Reply #29 on: September 05, 2018, 01:33:20 PM »
Yes, that's correct, assuming you're only claiming points in these areas. You can just photocopy the contract you have. That's what I did.

Offline PaulineMacLeod

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Re: F2-7 Visa: A Question (and a Resource)
« Reply #30 on: September 06, 2018, 11:13:24 PM »
I am so happy for cheolsu! =)

A brief summary of the necessary documents. I've tried to reconcile everyone's experiences here. It'll save the F2-7 crowd from the (possible?) tedium of reading through all the previous posts.

[1] Age: Passport
[2] Education: Apostilled Degree (or a photocopy of the apostilled degree), signed/sealed transcipt (possibly unnecessary)
(****) If your diploma has ANY language not in English or Korean, you must have a translation attached. The translation must come in the form of a letter from your university on university letterhead---but not necessarily signed by the university. I can personally testify to this because my college translated my diploma for me on a letter with university letterhead, but there was no signature (only the printed name of the registrar officer).

[3] Language: KIIP material completion certificate (사회통합프로그램 교육확인서) printable online, KIIP exam passed certificate, TOPIK score report
[4] Income: 근로소득 원친징수영수증 / 근로소득 지 급 명세서 (most recent calendar year): original only (****)
(****) For people who apply in the middle of the year, 갑종근로 소득에 대한 소득세 원천 징수 확인서 (original copies) might seem okay. I would bring both the 근로소득 원친징수영수증 / 근로소득 지 급 명세서 and the 갑종근로 소득에 대한 소득세 원천 징수 확인서.
[5] 재직증명서 (employment verification): original only
[6] 거주지 확인서 (proof of residence): copy okay, perhaps original preferred
[7] 사업자득록증 사본 (employer's business license with number): copy okay
[8] 운영등록증 (operational license): copy okay
[9] Form Number 34---the 통합신청서 (신고서)
[10] Taxes: I am not sure what immigration will count on this one. Cheolsu seems to imply that the 원천징수영수증 / 갑종근로 소득에 대한 소득세 원천 징수 확인서 will suffice, but immigration in December 2017 told me that these documents would not count for tax points. As far as I know, the 납세증명서 document, apparently issued every May, is the only one that immigration will accept. Tax points are only counted according to this document.
[11] Any and all documents signed by CEOs (possibly including tax forms) testifying to work experience RELEVANT TO YOUR MAJOR outside Korea. And what is more: If you attended school during any of these work experiences, immigration will not count those "overlapped days" in your calculations. Not a problem for you if you've worked a job long after you've graduated. But it is a problem if, like me, your jobs and your school attendance overlapped---and immigration will not count those days in the calculations.

As I noted earlier in this thread, and as cheolsu also correctly points out, F2-7 applicants with documents from Korea will have a slightly easier time applying for this visa than applicants with documents from outside Korea---mainly because Korean immigration will try to find a million reasons to dispute the authenticity of your non-Korean document(s).

Online cheolsu

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Re: F2-7 Visa: A Question (and a Resource)
« Reply #31 on: September 07, 2018, 09:06:48 AM »
Thanks, Pauline. I can confirm that I didn't have a 납세증명서 and got points for taxes paid using the 근로소득원천징수 영수증 and 갑근세 원천징수확인서.

In general, the more documents you have the better it is. Having things like your employer's business registration certificate or original work contracts is nice. This will be particularly important if you're trying to use overseas experience. As Pauline noted above, the conversation can get bogged down in trying to prove these documents are legitimate.

Offline PaulineMacLeod

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Re: F2-7 Visa: A Question (and a Resource)
« Reply #32 on: September 09, 2018, 12:43:33 AM »
Yes, that's right, Cheolsu. I was just looking at my spirit duplicates and yes, I included contracts (and business registration certificates) of all my overseas work experience periods. These contracts were signed and dated by me and my boss. Immigration clearly looked at the dates of these contracts of my work outside of Korea, and they calculated the years of my overseas professional experience according to the dates of those contracts.

Perhaps I should rephrase what I said earlier. Yes, immigration will closely study overseas documents for authenticity. But that won't take long because immigration will find something else to talk about. They asked me a zillion questions about what I was submitting from my non-Korea documents. Fortunately for me, I anticipated this because my boss helped me to put labels on my non-Korean documents. These labels said (in Korean) the Korean document considered equivalent to the non-Korean one that I was submitting.