June 20, 2018, 10:09:31 AM

Author Topic: Special Needs Advice  (Read 1363 times)

Offline shaneteacher

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Special Needs Advice
« on: April 25, 2012, 01:30:01 PM »
I'm seeking some advice concerning a special needs student in my school. This student is not  in any of my classes but finds his way into my classroom between classes. The boy is 3rd grade middle school. The issue I have with him is that he is rather disruptive and boarding on downright destructive. What he'll do is come into the room and straighten all the chairs...I'm fine with that, of course. However, then he will start throwing around pens or whatnot. He's taken a liking to eating on the microphones, and has a fascination with the ceiling fans (as in climbing up on the tables to plug them in).
    So I've brought this the the attention to my co teachers, and they've told me to say "no," "stop," etc. in both English and Korean. It has no effect. The situation has been brought to the attention of the homeroom teacher, and I think it's the case where the homeroom teacher has no control, as well. The special ed. helper came to my room and told me that I should say "no" and "stop" and etc.
    Today, the boy came in and was climbing all around under my desk and has unplugged most of my equipment. I do my best not to be ticked off out of my mind as it's not really his fault that he doesn't know any better. I am ticked that I have no support with dealing with this. I don't think I should have to hide everything between classes.

     So, does anyone out there in waygookland have any advice on how to deal with this?

Offline kyndo

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Re: Special Needs Advice
« Reply #1 on: April 25, 2012, 02:33:22 PM »
I have a brother with special needs (William's Syndrome) and find that redirecting his attention always works much better than trying to outright deny him something.

For example, when your student next shows up to your class, immediately greet him and give him a task to focus his attention on: have him rearrange the desks, or clean the chalkboards, or put handouts on all the desks etc. Idle hands etc etc.

Also, directly approaching him and focusing all your attention on him will either intimidate him and make it less likely that he will constantly come in and play with all the nifty electronic gizmos, or it will help you establish a connection with him, which will (might) encourage him to take you more seriously.

Also, I'm not sure what level of special needs your student is, but generally, the Sp. Ed. teachers keep a very short rein on them at my school, and if you point out that the student is endangering himself and being disruptive, I'm guessing that his attendant will keep a closer watch over him.

Hope this helps! ;D

Offline shaneteacher

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Re: Special Needs Advice
« Reply #2 on: April 25, 2012, 02:55:27 PM »
Thanks a lot for the info. I've been trying some of these things, but hearing this from you gives me more focus. What I hear from the students in his class is that the only thing he does all day is sleep. With that, I understand where the interaction and activity is very exciting for him.
   In any case, thanks again for the help!

Offline Shreya_pandey

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Re: Special Needs Advice
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2018, 04:32:48 PM »
I'm seeking some advice concerning a special needs student in my school. This student is not  in any of my classes but finds his way into my classroom between classes. The boy is 3rd grade middle school. The issue I have with him is that he is rather disruptive and boarding on downright destructive. What he'll do is come into the room and straighten all the chairs...I'm fine with that, of course. However, then he will start throwing around pens or whatnot. He's taken a liking to eating on the microphones, and has a fascination with the ceiling fans (as in climbing up on the tables to plug them in).
    So I've brought this the the attention to my co teachers, and they've told me to say "no," "stop," etc. in both English and Korean. It has no effect. The situation has been brought to the attention of the homeroom teacher, and I think it's the case where the homeroom teacher has no control, as well. The special ed. helper came to my room and told me that I should say "no" and "stop" and etc.
    Today, the boy came in and was climbing all around under my desk and has unplugged most of my equipment. I do my best not to be ticked off out of my mind as it's not really his fault that he doesn't know any better. I am ticked that I have no support with dealing with this. I don't think I should have to hide everything between classes.

     So, does anyone out there in waygookland have any advice on how to deal with this?

Addressing aggressive behaviors with special needs children and adolescents can be a frustrating and demanding process. The challenge is to address the behavior in a productive manner, rather than reactive.
When children with special needs are exhibiting aggressive behaviors, they may not be receiving adequate support in mastering their environments. violent behavior among young children does not necessarily reflect willfulness; often the child lacks the requisite social skills that schools can help them learn. surely the young children that are not assisted early on will maintain and gain additional deficits as teenagers. In addition, the specific challenges each child is facing should be considered in order to rule out further special needs. For example, undiagnosed mental health concerns cannot be overlooked. When thing that came tomy mind when you said that he has talen a special liking for the ceiling fans, is it that he is suffering from the stimming syndrome? Stimming is repetitive movement to stimulate one of the five senses in a controlled way. Itís heavily associated with autism but, actually, everyone stims to some extent (ex. Biting your nails, clicking a pen, bouncing your leg). Autistic people usually stim in different ways and more often than non-autistic people.  I think best thing that you could do is do a little bit of research and let the parent know. ask them if his behavior is the same at home too
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