January 17, 2018, 05:10:58 AM

Author Topic: autistic student in 3rd grade  (Read 1647 times)

Offline lydiagst

  • Newgookin
  • Posts: 4
  • Gender: Female
autistic student in 3rd grade
« on: September 17, 2011, 08:03:17 PM »
On the first day of teaching English to a 3rd grade class in Korea, the teacher informed me that one of the students is autistic. Since then I have been thinking about what I can do for this student. Obviously, the school thinks the best thing for this student is to keep him integrated with other students. I just feel that I should work a little harder and come up with maybe different assignments for him... I am not sure how to go about doing this or even if it is the right thing to do. Has anyone had any experience working with autistic students anywhere? Any suggestions?

Thanks

Offline jrich0410

  • Adventurer
  • *
  • Posts: 65
Re: autistic student in 3rd grade
« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2011, 02:56:35 PM »
I also have an autistic student, except in 5th grade. My student is very autistic to the point where I really can't teach him at all and he disrupts the class all the time. In my case, I try to ignore him and I also try to keep the other students from harassing him. If your student is less severe, you can try to help him a little bit after class when the other children leave. If you really want to take extra time to help, maybe you can work with him after lunch if you have the time to work with him one on one.

Offline eveliens

  • Super Waygook
  • ***
  • Posts: 352
  • Gender: Female
Re: autistic student in 3rd grade
« Reply #2 on: September 19, 2011, 10:55:20 AM »
I have an autistic child in my 4th grade class. My situation is a bit different because his "specialty" is language, he's high functioning, and he's near-fluent in the English he knows (which is a lot; apparently he learned it all from TV??). The biggest problem I have is that he gets very frustrated with his low level classmates and... SCREAMS like a banshee, yikes. Or slams things, or flips me off, or eats paper, or throws erasers on the heater... he's not shy about letting everyone know his displeasure . It doesn't help that his classmates haze him either.

I would really see if you could set aside some time with your student one-on-one. At the very least you'll build rapport and head off some potential tantrums. It doesn't have to be long, just 5-10 minutes or so. Once I started doing that with mine, he mellowed out a bit and tried harder to hold his temper for me. No more screams :)

And try to be very patient. Even more so than you normally would.

Offline up_do

  • Adventurer
  • *
  • Posts: 48
Re: autistic student in 3rd grade
« Reply #3 on: September 19, 2011, 11:19:59 AM »
Hey,

I have two autistic boys in my 4th grade. I have some letters of the alphabet colouring sheets that I give them each class. They just colour/trace letters and seem genuinely happy to be doing something. They usually do about 2 sheets each class and I put their nicest completed one on the whiteboard with other notable work completed by both my 4th and 6th graders. http://www.first-school.ws/theme/alphabetp1.htm These are the colouring sheets I give them. :)

Hope this helps,
Cheers,
Erika

Offline rookiewaygook

  • Veteran
  • **
  • Posts: 235
  • Gender: Female
Re: autistic student in 3rd grade
« Reply #4 on: September 19, 2011, 12:00:51 PM »
I have no idea how to teach autistic children, but when I realized there was an autistic student in my class, I googled somewhere that they learn differently - and that learning methods varies and depends on the person.

So basically, I repeat myself, but differently (pictures, fill in blanks, get them to repeat after me, different sizes and colors in words to make points, actual items, videos, plays) and hope that one of the methods gets to him. I finally had a breakthrough in the second semester (took the summer to think things through).

I think most of my students think the repetition is overkill, but, oh well.

He's pretty confident in his answers, and actually participates actively. The only problem I'm facing now is that the other students are giving him a hard time when he speaks (he speaks quite peculiar) and they make him curse in English - and then laugh at him :(
« Last Edit: September 20, 2011, 02:34:48 PM by rookiewaygook »

Offline Loudine

  • Veteran
  • **
  • Posts: 85
  • Gender: Female
Re: autistic student in 3rd grade
« Reply #5 on: September 20, 2011, 11:04:21 AM »
It's true that autistic children learn differently from other children without learning challenges.  There are many aspects to autism, and people with this challenge differ with regard to how their type of autism manifests.  Generally, they like routine, and for things to be the same.  They don't usually like to be touched, and they don't understand social behaviours very well.  They also don't get sarcasm, innuendo or anything that is implied indirectly.  Much of this won't be relevant when you're dealing with EFL students anyway, but that just as some background.  Find out what their proficiency level is, and give them work aimed at that level, but around the same theme as what the rest of the class is doing, if you can.  Find out what their strengths are and work with that, finding things to reward them for.  You will probably need to speak to their home-room teacher or your CT's to find this out.  And finally, yes, be extra patient.

Offline lydiagst

  • Newgookin
  • Posts: 4
  • Gender: Female
Re: autistic student in 3rd grade
« Reply #6 on: September 20, 2011, 06:59:11 PM »
Thanks for all the advice!  My student is pretty high functioning. He does have a very disruptive habit of getting out of his seat -(in the middle isle) and going up to his homeroom teacher ( my co-teacher) to say something very brief to her, also he usually touches her, puts his hand on her's or they do a have hug, which I thought was odd for someone with autism, but, once again he is pretty high functioning. So, essentially what I want to focus on is keeping him in his seat. He seems a bit bored with the material so I may try some of the activities you all have suggested!! Thanks again! :)

Offline JasonB

  • Waygookin
  • *
  • Posts: 12
  • Gender: Male
Re: autistic student in 3rd grade
« Reply #7 on: September 20, 2011, 09:24:34 PM »
Just a random throw in here... but the book, "The curious incident of the dog in the night time" is... firstly a really good book and I think gives a lot of insight into the mind of an autistic kid (mosy notably the "highly fluent TV watching banshee", especially in where the frustration comes from and also how they process the world in such a different way).

Although this might not be the most direct way of dealing with the problem, I think it offers more of a dimension to how you might see the problem and read a good book along the way. I have one (and I think maybe two). The one has quite a large problem with language on the whole, including hangul (I think that's right). I think the problem with her stems more from that no one knows how to teach her differently to the conventional way. I think auditory is her difficulty so I'm going to give a shot at that tracing letters idea and then once the ball is rolling see where it travels and take it from there.

Offline oversee

  • Newgookin
  • Posts: 4
Re: autistic student in 3rd grade
« Reply #8 on: September 21, 2011, 04:40:16 PM »
When these children are very disruptive, it is unfair to the other students to keep them in the class, but I know that the current thinking is to integrate as much as possible. One thing to understand is that every autistic child is different, so you will need different methods depending on what works with the child. You have to realize that things that work with regular kids won't necessarily work with autistic kids.
My son is on the autistic spectrum but he is so high functioning that we didn't get a diagnosis until he was almost 18. The most frustrating thing to us was that even though we explained thoroughly his condition to all the teachers, some of them never understood. For example, my son would never make eye contact and one teacher decided that meant he was disrespectful.
If your student likes touch, it is likely that he has Asperger's because most autistic kids are disturbed by being touched and by the feel of certain things. My son won't wear glasses because he can't stand having something on his face. Buying him clothes was a challenge because they had to feel right. He hated any kind of attention. The worst thing a teacher could do was single him out - it didn't matter if it was for punishment or praise. My son was also very stubborn, so the more you tried to force him to do something, the less likely he was to do it. He exhibited passive-aggressive behavior.
I guess the most important thing to remember is that they aren't doing these behaviors to annoy you. Your student probably has a need to leave his seat and if you force him to stay in his seat, he could become more disruptive than what he is doing now. You might set specific times he can leave his seat, or tasks he has to complete before he can leave his seat. And why not move his seat to the front so he isn't disturbing the other students when he gets up?

Offline grey

  • Hero of Waygookistan
  • *****
  • Posts: 1381
  • Gender: Male
  • Cya West Japan aka Baby China
Re: autistic student in 3rd grade
« Reply #9 on: January 13, 2018, 12:32:50 PM »
When these children are very disruptive, it is unfair to the other students to keep them in the class, but I know that the current thinking is to integrate as much as possible. One thing to understand is that every autistic child is different, so you will need different methods depending on what works with the child. You have to realize that things that work with regular kids won't necessarily work with autistic kids.
My son is on the autistic spectrum but he is so high functioning that we didn't get a diagnosis until he was almost 18. The most frustrating thing to us was that even though we explained thoroughly his condition to all the teachers, some of them never understood. For example, my son would never make eye contact and one teacher decided that meant he was disrespectful.
If your student likes touch, it is likely that he has Asperger's because most autistic kids are disturbed by being touched and by the feel of certain things. My son won't wear glasses because he can't stand having something on his face. Buying him clothes was a challenge because they had to feel right. He hated any kind of attention. The worst thing a teacher could do was single him out - it didn't matter if it was for punishment or praise. My son was also very stubborn, so the more you tried to force him to do something, the less likely he was to do it. He exhibited passive-aggressive behavior.
I guess the most important thing to remember is that they aren't doing these behaviors to annoy you. Your student probably has a need to leave his seat and if you force him to stay in his seat, he could become more disruptive than what he is doing now. You might set specific times he can leave his seat, or tasks he has to complete before he can leave his seat. And why not move his seat to the front so he isn't disturbing the other students when he gets up?

I've been reading a bit about autism and a lot of it didn't seem like it was much like a friend of mine. This seems a lot like him. It could also be confirmation bias. I wish I knew more about autism than I know now when I was teaching.
Ko fills half his luggage with instant noodles for his international business travels, a lesson he learned after assuming on his first trip that three packages would suffice for six days. “Man, was I wrong. Since then, I always make sure I pack enough.”
-AP