October 17, 2018, 08:03:21 PM


Author Topic: Jung-gu (Seoul) to provide native English teachers for all schools in district  (Read 1565 times)

Offline hangook77

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Jung-gu to provide native English teachers for all schools in district.  (Elementary and Middle School, possibly High School.)


http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/nation/2018/03/356_245721.html?utm_source=dable

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17 new jobs? 10 new jobs? Unless teachers have to travel to multiple schools...but either way a good start. Hopefully other districts will follow suit.

Online Cyanea

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Jung-gu District in central Seoul will spend 830 million won (about $780,000) this year

830 million for what, 12 schools max?

Lets break that down. They'll be paying each new teacher 1.8 then pocketing the rest for soju money.
Catch my drift?

Offline hamid62

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17 new jobs? 10 new jobs? Unless teachers have to travel to multiple schools...but either way a good start. Hopefully other districts will follow suit.
Most likely they will have multiple schools (which means they'll get an extra 100,000+ per month).

I wouldn't mind doing this if middle and high school positions opened up and we could apply to SMOE directly instead of through EPIK.

Offline hangook77

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Jung-gu District in central Seoul will spend 830 million won (about $780,000) this year

830 million for what, 12 schools max?

Lets break that down. They'll be paying each new teacher 1.8 then pocketing the rest for soju money.

1.8?  They cut your salary in Seoul?  Shouldn't they pay more up there than down here in the south?  I'm upper 2.0's not including the rent allowance.  (Almost 3 million.)  I am a level 1+.  So, 4 or 5 years later salary I guess.  Anyhow, I get 400,000 rent subsidy.  In Seoul rents are more, so those should be double at least for rent subsidies. 

Online shostager

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Rent subsidy is 500,000 in through EPIK in Seoul, although I heard you get more in Gangnam (they have their own hiring procedures).

They also pay less because Seoul is in more demand. Somewhat like the situation in Japan vs. other countries, I imagine.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2018, 01:40:37 PM by shostager »

Offline hangook77

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But is it really only 1.8?  I think first year here is 2.1 but they only hire experienced or tesol so you start at 2.2.  Level 1 plus is 2.7 plus money for multiple schools. In a gun or country it's another 100 k won on top of that and then you get 400,000 for rent if you get your own place. 

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Yes. 1.8.
http://www.korvia.com/korvia-smoe/smoe-salary-levels/
And...
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Renewal Allowance is no longer available.

Offline grey

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I could have earned 1.8 my first year but got a silly tefl that bumped it to 2.0.
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Online oglop

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only prepared to pay 1.8

what was that news article a while ago about korean teachers complaining about the quality of native teachers?

can't have it both ways

Offline hamid62

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But is it really only 1.8?  I think first year here is 2.1 but they only hire experienced or tesol so you start at 2.2.  Level 1 plus is 2.7 plus money for multiple schools. In a gun or country it's another 100 k won on top of that and then you get 400,000 for rent if you get your own place.
Officially it is 1.8 million but as EPIK now requires a TEFL (or valid teaching license) nobody actually earns that much anymore for their first year. On top of that, if you've spent 2-3 years with one school in particular (even if it's in another country) prior to applying, you get booted up to Level 1 automatically with most MOEs and every POE (Level B with SMOE). And just as you mentioned, you get an additional 100k if you teach in the countryside, and an additional 100,000 if you teach at more than one school.

If the govt is seriously considering taking native teachers out of their own countries bringing them to the most expensive city in the country just to pay them only 1.8 a month, they're going to be highly disappointed when those teachers quit (assuming they agree to those wages in the first place).

Offline MayorHaggar

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Anyone willing to get paid 1.8m for full-time teaching is a chump. 2.1 or 2.2 is fine but 1.8 is just stupid.

At some point Korean bureaucrats will do the math and just decide to hire Filipinos and Chinese teachers to teach English for slave wages. Most countries allow this and Korean politicians have already talked about doing it. Koreans HATE spending money but they love the idea of English education.

Offline hangook77

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Anyone willing to get paid 1.8m for full-time teaching is a chump. 2.1 or 2.2 is fine but 1.8 is just stupid.

At some point Korean bureaucrats will do the math and just decide to hire Filipinos and Chinese teachers to teach English for slave wages. Most countries allow this and Korean politicians have already talked about doing it. Koreans HATE spending money but they love the idea of English education.

Even 2.1 or 2.2 is low.  I see a lot of hakwon ads that can get up to 2.4 2.5 or 2.6ish?  Some are lower than this of course.  But 1.8 and complaining we are too expensive?  Aren't Korean teachers who have been teaching for several years getting paid more than this and there are more of them?  Are they out to lunch? 

Offline hamid62

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Koreans are less likely to complain about salary and benefits than foreigners are because of the culture and the way the economy is. A lot of people are overqualified (on paper anyway) for the jobs they have and because they’re less likely to skip town their contracts are longer as well as their vacations—not sure if those vacations are paid full time or at all, but it’s probably the latter. Most Koreans also choose to live their families until they’re married so that’s less money to consider giving them compared to us (free accommodation or housing allowance.) And because they’re citizens, no need to sponsor a visa or possibly pay for a $1000+ plane ticket. This is probably what’s going on from the government’s point of view.

But like we’ve already pointed out, they’re probably not going to get anyone to leave their home country to come and work for a measly 1.8 million in Seoul because it’s the most expensive city, the cost of living along with working qualification requirements have been rising since 10+ years ago but the salaries have not. There’s no real incentive to come over and take a job with such low pay unless someone really wants to be in Seoul and not save any money.

Additionally, if they have each co-teacher teach at multiple schools, chances are each class will have up to 2 hours of English class with a native teacher a week which really isn’t enough exposure for studying a language. It’ll be the same story all over again—placing the blame on the native teacher without considering that the teacher is being poorly utilized.

Offline CJ

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Koreans are less likely to complain about salary and benefits than foreigners are because of the culture and the way the economy is. A lot of people are overqualified (on paper anyway) for the jobs they have and because they’re less likely to skip town their contracts are longer as well as their vacations—not sure if those vacations are paid full time or at all, but it’s probably the latter. Most Koreans also choose to live their families until they’re married so that’s less money to consider giving them compared to us (free accommodation or housing allowance.) And because they’re citizens, no need to sponsor a visa or possibly pay for a $1000+ plane ticket. This is probably what’s going on from the government’s point of view.

But like we’ve already pointed out, they’re probably not going to get anyone to leave their home country to come and work for a measly 1.8 million in Seoul because it’s the most expensive city, the cost of living along with working qualification requirements have been rising since 10+ years ago but the salaries have not. There’s no real incentive to come over and take a job with such low pay unless someone really wants to be in Seoul and not save any money.

Additionally, if they have each co-teacher teach at multiple schools, chances are each class will have up to 2 hours of English class with a native teacher a week which really isn’t enough exposure for studying a language. It’ll be the same story all over again—placing the blame on the native teacher without considering that the teacher is being poorly utilized.

From Korvia:

Our #1 priority is you. We believe that by hiring qualified and dedicated teachers we can improve the overall quality of the Korean education as a whole. In order to select the best teachers, we like to hire straight out of university blonde women to add to the diversity of Korea. To make the program as cost effective as possible, we try to hire teachers on the bottom of the pay scale. 1.8m a month is more than enough incentive to uproot yourself from home and to travel many hours on a plane to a country that not only has four seasons, but has spicy cabbage as its national dish. No teaching qualifications are required other than having enthusiasm for having your co-teacher disappear for the duration of your class while students with beginner English level look at themselves adoringly in mirrors, talk in Korean and wrestle on the floor. We pride ourselves in making sure that all teachers are told things at the last minute, and then blame them for not knowing anything. If this sounds like its for you, please send your resume to the following address: there'soneborneveryminute@gmail.com

Offline hangook77

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Koreans are less likely to complain about salary and benefits than foreigners are because of the culture and the way the economy is. A lot of people are overqualified (on paper anyway) for the jobs they have and because they’re less likely to skip town their contracts are longer as well as their vacations—not sure if those vacations are paid full time or at all, but it’s probably the latter. Most Koreans also choose to live their families until they’re married so that’s less money to consider giving them compared to us (free accommodation or housing allowance.) And because they’re citizens, no need to sponsor a visa or possibly pay for a $1000+ plane ticket. This is probably what’s going on from the government’s point of view.

But like we’ve already pointed out, they’re probably not going to get anyone to leave their home country to come and work for a measly 1.8 million in Seoul because it’s the most expensive city, the cost of living along with working qualification requirements have been rising since 10+ years ago but the salaries have not. There’s no real incentive to come over and take a job with such low pay unless someone really wants to be in Seoul and not save any money.

Additionally, if they have each co-teacher teach at multiple schools, chances are each class will have up to 2 hours of English class with a native teacher a week which really isn’t enough exposure for studying a language. It’ll be the same story all over again—placing the blame on the native teacher without considering that the teacher is being poorly utilized.

From Korvia:

Our #1 priority is you. We believe that by hiring qualified and dedicated teachers we can improve the overall quality of the Korean education as a whole. In order to select the best teachers, we like to hire straight out of university blonde women to add to the diversity of Korea. To make the program as cost effective as possible, we try to hire teachers on the bottom of the pay scale. 1.8m a month is more than enough incentive to uproot yourself from home and to travel many hours on a plane to a country that not only has four seasons, but has spicy cabbage as its national dish. No teaching qualifications are required other than having enthusiasm for having your co-teacher disappear for the duration of your class while students with beginner English level look at themselves adoringly in mirrors, talk in Korean and wrestle on the floor. We pride ourselves in making sure that all teachers are told things at the last minute, and then blame them for not knowing anything. If this sounds like its for you, please send your resume to the following address: there'soneborneveryminute@gmail.com

That's good. 

As for the rest of it, a Korean teacher working 10 years is around 2.7, starts first year at 1.8.  Goes up 100 K a month each year?  So, 15 years, 3.2 million and 20 years 3.7?  Up and up and up.  Also, they can get promotions and other pay raises, etc.  Granted it took me 5 years or so to get up to this level when factoring in multiple schools allowance, renewal allowance slip out per month, some small overtime, rent allowance, etc.  But another 5 years of the same or similar wage and inflation taking the toll on that.  So, good and bad.  But 1.8 and no renewal allowance and prob a really run down apartment for Seoul?  Sounds like BS to me unless they give you extra perks like extra days off and go home earlies.  I was under the old pay scale 1.9 in the country.  It was low, but I got lots of extra unofficial days off, lots of being sent home early in the afternoon, no desk warming, and the cost of living 10 years back much cheaper.  I live in a bigger regional city now and the 4 30 thing is more enforced.  But I also get paid much more.  So, meh! 

Offline hangook77

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1.8 a month in Seoul and no renewal allowance?  Also no exit allowance then too?  If so, that's Japan style.  Might as well go to Japan and be poor.  I guess you could do one of those crappy online TESOLs to get a small bump?  Anyways, sounds like it's better to go hakwon in Seoul?