August 16, 2018, 11:27:29 PM


Author Topic: Schools to hire more native English speakers  (Read 3020 times)

Offline some waygug-in

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Re: Schools to hire more native English speakers
« Reply #40 on: March 08, 2018, 06:46:11 AM »
http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/nation/2018/03/356_245251.html

Video lessons cheaper than NETs?  Whodathunkit?

Online Piggydee

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Re: Schools to hire more native English speakers
« Reply #41 on: March 08, 2018, 07:24:51 AM »
About 2 years ago my kids did an afterschool online program, that relegated my job to hall monitor; basically.  In the mornings I taught class as usually but for my after-school classes I had to monitor that mess.  Let me tell you, it doesn't work.  I had to spend the greater part of last year re-introducing the alphabet to my then second graders because they apparently didn't soak it up from the online classes they had for afterschool during their first grade year.   Those classes don't work! 

Online eggieguffer

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Re: Schools to hire more native English speakers
« Reply #42 on: March 08, 2018, 08:42:25 AM »
http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/nation/2018/03/356_245251.html

Video lessons cheaper than NETs?  Whodathunkit?

People from the Philippines are not native speakers. It's a second language like it is for Indians. I've tested people from both countries at IELTS and their scores can vary from 5.5 up to 9. Sure they majored in education and English but then again so did a lot of Korean PS teachers. Not saying there aren't some very good teachers from there who might be better than NETs. Just saying the nationality is not a guarantee of native speaker speech.
« Last Edit: March 08, 2018, 08:45:11 AM by eggieguffer »

Online Savant

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Re: Schools to hire more native English speakers
« Reply #43 on: March 08, 2018, 08:50:55 AM »
Bring back the robots! They were the future, I heard?

Offline sojuadventurer

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Re: Schools to hire more native English speakers
« Reply #44 on: March 08, 2018, 09:29:33 AM »
That seems to be the going trend here, honestly.... If you already have EPIK experience (meaning that you're higher on the pay scale and they'd have to pay you more than a newbie), they don't want you. They want the 22 year old with no experience who is fresh out of university and will accept low pay. They don't care how your experience makes you a more suitable teacher in the classroom. They don't care if you have a passion for the job. It all comes down to numbers. I had a similar situation to yours about a year ago. I just decided to venture out on my own and look for direct hire jobs. I managed to land a much better job directly through an education office that offers the same benefits as public school, but that actually wants someone with experience and passion for the job. Best decision I ever made.
Might I know which MOE/POE that was? I am curious as most of them have been taken over by EPIK with the exception of CNOE and GOE as far as I know. Even JLP was taken over by EPIK recently

Even in places where EPIK seemingly reigns supreme, if you're willing to do the grunt work, there are direct hires out there. At my current place of employment we have five teachers. Three of us are direct hires and two are EPIK teachers. I interviewed for other direct hire jobs before accepting this one.... one was in Geoje and one was in Gyeonngi-do. So they are out there.... but you do have to dig through all the garbage hagwon jobs out there, and they are more competitive maybe than the run-of-the-mill hagwon would be. Be still worth it if you can find them, IMO.

Online Chinguetti

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Re: Schools to hire more native English speakers
« Reply #45 on: March 08, 2018, 09:48:45 AM »
+1 for the direct hires. A lot of public schools either prefer that method, or EPIK wasn't able to provide enough teachers to schools in certain areas for whatever reason (often comes down to a breakdown in communication from the education offices, though). And you've also got schools that aren't willing to wait until the following year to replace a NET who had to suddenly leave in the middle of his/her contract.

As long as you're not adamant about sticking with cities like Busan and Seoul, you can find these jobs. I once met someone who found her job just by messaging around on FB and the like to find out which public schools in her area were looking for NETs.

Offline Dave Stepz

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Re: Schools to hire more native English speakers
« Reply #46 on: March 08, 2018, 10:41:38 AM »
That seems to be the going trend here, honestly.... If you already have EPIK experience (meaning that you're higher on the pay scale and they'd have to pay you more than a newbie), they don't want you. They want the 22 year old with no experience who is fresh out of university and will accept low pay. They don't care how your experience makes you a more suitable teacher in the classroom. They don't care if you have a passion for the job. It all comes down to numbers. I had a similar situation to yours about a year ago. I just decided to venture out on my own and look for direct hire jobs. I managed to land a much better job directly through an education office that offers the same benefits as public school, but that actually wants someone with experience and passion for the job. Best decision I ever made.
Might I know which MOE/POE that was? I am curious as most of them have been taken over by EPIK with the exception of CNOE and GOE as far as I know. Even JLP was taken over by EPIK recently

Even in places where EPIK seemingly reigns supreme, if you're willing to do the grunt work, there are direct hires out there. At my current place of employment we have five teachers. Three of us are direct hires and two are EPIK teachers. I interviewed for other direct hire jobs before accepting this one.... one was in Geoje and one was in Gyeonngi-do. So they are out there.... but you do have to dig through all the garbage hagwon jobs out there, and they are more competitive maybe than the run-of-the-mill hagwon would be. Be still worth it if you can find them, IMO.

I got my high school job as a direct hire by networking.  In 2015, as the cutbacks were being made in all middle schools in my province for education office funded teachers, I finished my middle school EPIK contract three months early to move to high school.  I wanted to stay in my city and knew that the two main high school's native teachers usually only stayed 1-2 years max.  I spoke to my friend at that school about that native teacher and whether she would renew.  She said she wouldn't, so I jumped in before they advertised.  I suppose if you stay a few years, and you're happy in your area, then asking around to previous co-teachers and other teachers can really pay dividends.

Offline tadpole511

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Re: Schools to hire more native English speakers
« Reply #47 on: March 08, 2018, 11:53:54 AM »
+1 for the direct hires. A lot of public schools either prefer that method, or EPIK wasn't able to provide enough teachers to schools in certain areas for whatever reason (often comes down to a breakdown in communication from the education offices, though). And you've also got schools that aren't willing to wait until the following year to replace a NET who had to suddenly leave in the middle of his/her contract.

As long as you're not adamant about sticking with cities like Busan and Seoul, you can find these jobs. I once met someone who found her job just by messaging around on FB and the like to find out which public schools in her area were looking for NETs.

Direct hire has been amazing so far for me. My EPIK school was a complete shitshow and I couldn't wait to get out of the place. I didn't like how we had no real idea where we'd be placed (beyond whichever Office of Education) until the end of orientation. It felt a bit disingenuous on EPIK's end--like they wanted us to have invested enough time and money into the process that we wouldn't quit when we found out we were placed in Podunk, Gangwon-do. Which I'm almost certain is the case, and I'm sure that if they did let us know where we were placed beforehand, there would be a much higher drop out rate. However, they tell you that you aren't placed until orientation, and that's not entirely true (can't speak for other OEs, but mine had the list of teachers out in mid-January). And the placements are entirely random, and it can lead to a lot of friction between KETs and NETs.

My second job, I did direct hire, and, so far, I've been happy. I wasn't opposed to hagwons since location was super important this time around (married, and SO's job wouldn't allow for a move, so I needed a job in SO's Seoul suburb), but I found three direct hire public schools in a 15 minute subway ride, and eventually accepted one of them. It was a lot more work. Just like with jobs back in the US, you have to do the legwork to find jobs like this. Craigslist and the usual job boards help to a certain point, but if you know where you want to be, just contact the schools/coteachers/current NETs in the area and ask around.