June 19, 2018, 05:27:11 AM

Author Topic: Schools to hire more native English speakers  (Read 2805 times)

Online Cyanea

  • Super Waygook
  • ***
  • Posts: 486
  • Gender: Male
Re: Schools to hire more native English speakers
« Reply #20 on: February 22, 2018, 05:07:51 PM »
I heard that Korean's working for big companies are told to move on as to give the young folks a job.

So they re-frame their unethical discrimination as a moral act? How Korean.
« Last Edit: February 22, 2018, 05:28:18 PM by Cyanea »
Catch my drift?

Offline some waygug-in

  • Super Waygook
  • ***
  • Posts: 359
  • Gender: Male
Re: Schools to hire more native English speakers
« Reply #21 on: February 22, 2018, 11:22:54 PM »

If the public school boards are going to hire more NET's in South Korea, I would love to
return to Korea. But you see, last year when I applied to go back into the EPIK program
for last August, they gave me a hard time to get a chance to get back in to a point that I
gave up on EPIK and decided to look for open doors. Two doors were open for me, one to
teaching EFL in China and the other for teaching for a First Nations reserve school board
here in Canada. I chose to stay in Canada. I still miss my EFL teaching life in South Korea.

That seems to be the going trend here, honestly.... If you already have EPIK experience (meaning that you're higher on the pay scale and they'd have to pay you more than a newbie), they don't want you. They want the 22 year old with no experience who is fresh out of university and will accept low pay. They don't care how your experience makes you a more suitable teacher in the classroom. They don't care if you have a passion for the job. It all comes down to numbers. I had a similar situation to yours about a year ago. I just decided to venture out on my own and look for direct hire jobs. I managed to land a much better job directly through an education office that offers the same benefits as public school, but that actually wants someone with experience and passion for the job. Best decision I ever made.

Bingo!

The last year I was there, I was told I had to accept entry level salary or not get a job.

The fun just never ends.   :wink:
« Last Edit: February 22, 2018, 11:33:12 PM by some waygug-in »

Offline Foreverparadise

  • Hero of Waygookistan
  • *****
  • Posts: 1414
  • Gender: Male
Re: Schools to hire more native English speakers
« Reply #22 on: February 23, 2018, 12:37:03 AM »

If the public school boards are going to hire more NET's in South Korea, I would love to
return to Korea. But you see, last year when I applied to go back into the EPIK program
for last August, they gave me a hard time to get a chance to get back in to a point that I
gave up on EPIK and decided to look for open doors. Two doors were open for me, one to
teaching EFL in China and the other for teaching for a First Nations reserve school board
here in Canada. I chose to stay in Canada. I still miss my EFL teaching life in South Korea.

That seems to be the going trend here, honestly.... If you already have EPIK experience (meaning that you're higher on the pay scale and they'd have to pay you more than a newbie), they don't want you. They want the 22 year old with no experience who is fresh out of university and will accept low pay. They don't care how your experience makes you a more suitable teacher in the classroom. They don't care if you have a passion for the job. It all comes down to numbers. I had a similar situation to yours about a year ago. I just decided to venture out on my own and look for direct hire jobs. I managed to land a much better job directly through an education office that offers the same benefits as public school, but that actually wants someone with experience and passion for the job. Best decision I ever made.

Bingo!

The last year I was there, I was told I had to accept entry level salary or not get a job.

The fun just never ends.   :wink:

I may never return to Korea to teach, but if I do return, with the experience I have I am willing to
take a lower salary as long as they provide me with housing. If they place me in an urban
area even better for them so they won't have to pay me an extra 100,000 a month for
rural allowance.

Online Cyanea

  • Super Waygook
  • ***
  • Posts: 486
  • Gender: Male
Re: Schools to hire more native English speakers
« Reply #23 on: February 23, 2018, 01:17:01 AM »

The last year I was there, I was told I had to accept entry level salary or not get a job.

The fun just never ends.   :wink:

I may never return to Korea to teach, but if I do return, with the experience I have I am willing to
take a lower salary as long as they provide me with housing. If they place me in an urban
area even better for them so they won't have to pay me an extra 100,000 a month for
rural allowance.


For the amount of visa hurdles and EPIK paperwork, China or Vietnam has got to be a more enticing prospect now surely.
Catch my drift?

Offline CJ

  • Super Waygook
  • ***
  • Posts: 465
Re: Schools to hire more native English speakers
« Reply #24 on: February 23, 2018, 07:45:49 AM »

The last year I was there, I was told I had to accept entry level salary or not get a job.

The fun just never ends.   :wink:

I may never return to Korea to teach, but if I do return, with the experience I have I am willing to
take a lower salary as long as they provide me with housing. If they place me in an urban
area even better for them so they won't have to pay me an extra 100,000 a month for
rural allowance.


For the amount of visa hurdles and EPIK paperwork, China or Vietnam has got to be a more enticing prospect now surely.

I'd look into the visa requirements of those two countries more carefully if I were you. The rules in Vietnam are fluid shall we say.

Offline andy80

  • Adventurer
  • *
  • Posts: 26
  • Gender: Male
Re: Schools to hire more native English speakers
« Reply #25 on: February 23, 2018, 08:37:00 AM »
I think we have to just think of English teaching in Korea as a temporary job (unless you are married to a Korean then you would have a better visa and no employer would need to sponsor you). Full time permanent employees of a Korean school get a nice pension and it is hard for a principal to fire them. So for the Koreans this is a career, for us this is a temp job and possibly a fun adventure in a foreign land. 

Offline Kayos

  • Expert Waygook
  • ****
  • Posts: 671
  • Gender: Male
Re: Schools to hire more native English speakers
« Reply #26 on: February 23, 2018, 08:51:25 AM »

If the public school boards are going to hire more NET's in South Korea, I would love to
return to Korea. But you see, last year when I applied to go back into the EPIK program
for last August, they gave me a hard time to get a chance to get back in to a point that I
gave up on EPIK and decided to look for open doors. Two doors were open for me, one to
teaching EFL in China and the other for teaching for a First Nations reserve school board
here in Canada. I chose to stay in Canada. I still miss my EFL teaching life in South Korea.

That seems to be the going trend here, honestly.... If you already have EPIK experience (meaning that you're higher on the pay scale and they'd have to pay you more than a newbie), they don't want you. They want the 22 year old with no experience who is fresh out of university and will accept low pay. They don't care how your experience makes you a more suitable teacher in the classroom. They don't care if you have a passion for the job. It all comes down to numbers. I had a similar situation to yours about a year ago. I just decided to venture out on my own and look for direct hire jobs. I managed to land a much better job directly through an education office that offers the same benefits as public school, but that actually wants someone with experience and passion for the job. Best decision I ever made.

Bingo!

The last year I was there, I was told I had to accept entry level salary or not get a job.

The fun just never ends.   :wink:

I may never return to Korea to teach, but if I do return, with the experience I have I am willing to
take a lower salary as long as they provide me with housing. If they place me in an urban
area even better for them so they won't have to pay me an extra 100,000 a month for
rural allowance.

Rural allowance is 200,000 a month; unless it varies by province. but both I've lived in have been 200,000

Offline MayorHaggar

  • The Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 3352
Re: Schools to hire more native English speakers
« Reply #27 on: February 23, 2018, 03:07:35 PM »
http://m.koreatimes.co.kr/phone/news/view.jsp?req_newsidx=244647

Koreans getting ready to revive the TaLK program after cutting it to the bone in the last few years.

Online Life Improvement

  • The Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 2744
Re: Schools to hire more native English speakers
« Reply #28 on: February 23, 2018, 03:20:55 PM »
Means less jobs for uni grads.

Quote
The applicants should hold citizenship of the United States, Canada, Britain, Australia and New Zealand or other English-speaking nations and have completed at least two years of a four-year college course.

For ethnic Koreans, living in these countries for at least eight years, being educated from primary and secondary to high school is required.


Ethnic Koreans age 18 will come.

Others age 20 will come. 

Online gogators!

  • The Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 2735
  • Gender: Male
Re: Schools to hire more native English speakers
« Reply #29 on: February 23, 2018, 04:33:53 PM »
Means less jobs for uni grads.

Quote
The applicants should hold citizenship of the United States, Canada, Britain, Australia and New Zealand or other English-speaking nations and have completed at least two years of a four-year college course.

For ethnic Koreans, living in these countries for at least eight years, being educated from primary and secondary to high school is required.


Ethnic Koreans age 18 will come.

Others age 20 will come.
Maybe some who want to take a break year will come. I can, though, imagine the trouble 18-year-olds away from home, many for the first time, could get into in Korea.

Maybe they'll require them to do a home-stay.

Offline hangook77

  • Super Waygook
  • ***
  • Posts: 494
  • Gender: Male
Re: Schools to hire more native English speakers
« Reply #30 on: February 23, 2018, 08:43:49 PM »
Times are looking up if the demand for us rises in public schools.  Hakwons seem to be raising salaries too.  So more teachers and more demand especially in the provinces would mean the first raise in years eventually?  Hard to say.  But good to hope for.

Online Cyanea

  • Super Waygook
  • ***
  • Posts: 486
  • Gender: Male
Re: Schools to hire more native English speakers
« Reply #31 on: February 23, 2018, 09:50:08 PM »
http://m.koreatimes.co.kr/phone/news/view.jsp?req_newsidx=244647

Koreans getting ready to revive the TaLK program after cutting it to the bone in the last few years.


This boom and bust cycle is a natural result of the Korean way of thinking.


A. The parents demand more English education.

B. Govt funds more English programs.

C.  Schools and education boards recruit only very young, inexperienced and unqualified teachers and weed out any competent or qualified ones.

D. Schools mismanage the FT's and the funds, then blame failures of the system on unqualified foreign teachers.

E. One-sided media documentaries help to publicize said failures. English programs get closed down. Back to A.
« Last Edit: February 23, 2018, 11:01:19 PM by Cyanea »
Catch my drift?

Offline dippedinblush

  • Veteran
  • **
  • Posts: 76
  • Gender: Female
Re: Schools to hire more native English speakers
« Reply #32 on: February 23, 2018, 11:19:27 PM »
+1

Online gogators!

  • The Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 2735
  • Gender: Male
Re: Schools to hire more native English speakers
« Reply #33 on: February 24, 2018, 07:27:39 AM »
http://m.koreatimes.co.kr/phone/news/view.jsp?req_newsidx=244647

Koreans getting ready to revive the TaLK program after cutting it to the bone in the last few years.


This boom and bust cycle is a natural result of the Korean way of thinking.


A. The parents demand more English education.

B. Govt funds more English programs.

C.  Schools and education boards recruit only very young, inexperienced and unqualified teachers and weed out any competent or qualified ones.

D. Schools mismanage the FT's and the funds, then blame failures of the system on unqualified foreign teachers.

E. One-sided media documentaries help to publicize said failures. English programs get closed down. Back to A.
Also the management style wherein the new chief whatever has to change policies, whether good or bad, just to put his/her stamp on things.

Offline MayorHaggar

  • The Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 3352
Re: Schools to hire more native English speakers
« Reply #34 on: February 24, 2018, 08:59:00 AM »
Means less jobs for uni grads.

Quote
The applicants should hold citizenship of the United States, Canada, Britain, Australia and New Zealand or other English-speaking nations and have completed at least two years of a four-year college course.

For ethnic Koreans, living in these countries for at least eight years, being educated from primary and secondary to high school is required.


Ethnic Koreans age 18 will come.

Others age 20 will come.

TaLK used to be big in Chungbuk and from what I saw it didn't compete with EPIK jobs at all. Teachers would come for 6 months to a year and were placed at very small rural schools (like 5-10 kids). They had a part-time schedule but also got paid part-time salaries and were expected to do a lot of Korean "cultural events" in their spare time. A lot of them did it because their college back home had a relationship with TaLK and would send students to do the program and get college credit for it.

It's kind of weird that they're letting Koreans right out of high school teach, but whatever. Korea gonna Korea.

In some ways I'd say TaLK is a better idea than EPIK. It's putting English teachers in tiny neglected rural schools, it's not wasting money hand over fist, it's promoting cultural exchange, and nobody mistakes it for a career the way a lot of EPIK teachers do with their joke teaching jobs.
« Last Edit: February 24, 2018, 09:01:17 AM by MayorHaggar »

Online Cyanea

  • Super Waygook
  • ***
  • Posts: 486
  • Gender: Male
Re: Schools to hire more native English speakers
« Reply #35 on: February 24, 2018, 01:51:42 PM »
http://m.koreatimes.co.kr/phone/news/view.jsp?req_newsidx=244647

Koreans getting ready to revive the TaLK program after cutting it to the bone in the last few years.


This boom and bust cycle is a natural result of the Korean way of thinking.


A. The parents demand more English education.

B. Govt funds more English programs.

C.  Schools and education boards recruit only very young, inexperienced and unqualified teachers and weed out any competent or qualified ones.

D. Schools mismanage the FT's and the funds, then blame failures of the system on unqualified foreign teachers.

E. One-sided media documentaries help to publicize said failures. English programs get closed down. Back to A.
Also the management style wherein the new chief whatever has to change policies, whether good or bad, just to put his/her stamp on things.

true.

Koreans think change is the same as progress.

Thus most workplaces are a transitory revolving door.
« Last Edit: February 24, 2018, 01:53:53 PM by Cyanea »
Catch my drift?

Offline MayorHaggar

  • The Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 3352
Re: Schools to hire more native English speakers
« Reply #36 on: February 24, 2018, 11:24:57 PM »
Change and LOUD NOISES.

Offline hamid62

  • Adventurer
  • *
  • Posts: 52
  • Gender: Male
Re: Schools to hire more native English speakers
« Reply #37 on: February 25, 2018, 08:28:37 PM »
That seems to be the going trend here, honestly.... If you already have EPIK experience (meaning that you're higher on the pay scale and they'd have to pay you more than a newbie), they don't want you. They want the 22 year old with no experience who is fresh out of university and will accept low pay. They don't care how your experience makes you a more suitable teacher in the classroom. They don't care if you have a passion for the job. It all comes down to numbers. I had a similar situation to yours about a year ago. I just decided to venture out on my own and look for direct hire jobs. I managed to land a much better job directly through an education office that offers the same benefits as public school, but that actually wants someone with experience and passion for the job. Best decision I ever made.
Might I know which MOE/POE that was? I am curious as most of them have been taken over by EPIK with the exception of CNOE and GOE as far as I know. Even JLP was taken over by EPIK recently

Offline Foreverparadise

  • Hero of Waygookistan
  • *****
  • Posts: 1414
  • Gender: Male
Re: Schools to hire more native English speakers
« Reply #38 on: March 07, 2018, 10:42:23 PM »

The last year I was there, I was told I had to accept entry level salary or not get a job.

The fun just never ends.   :wink:

I may never return to Korea to teach, but if I do return, with the experience I have I am willing to
take a lower salary as long as they provide me with housing. If they place me in an urban
area even better for them so they won't have to pay me an extra 100,000 a month for
rural allowance.


For the amount of visa hurdles and EPIK paperwork, China or Vietnam has got to be a more enticing prospect now surely.

That is true. But China seems more enticing than Vietnam. I was offered a contract for China
but instead I heeded the call to stay home in Canada. But with regards to EFL, how about Thailand?

Offline CJ

  • Super Waygook
  • ***
  • Posts: 465
Re: Schools to hire more native English speakers
« Reply #39 on: March 08, 2018, 05:54:50 AM »

The last year I was there, I was told I had to accept entry level salary or not get a job.

The fun just never ends.   :wink:

I may never return to Korea to teach, but if I do return, with the experience I have I am willing to
take a lower salary as long as they provide me with housing. If they place me in an urban
area even better for them so they won't have to pay me an extra 100,000 a month for
rural allowance.


For the amount of visa hurdles and EPIK paperwork, China or Vietnam has got to be a more enticing prospect now surely.

That is true. But China seems more enticing than Vietnam. I was offered a contract for China
but instead I heeded the call to stay home in Canada. But with regards to EFL, how about Thailand?

Thailand? 30,000 baht is the norm in the cities which is about 1,000,000 won a month! If you’re frugal and live like a local, you might be able to save the proverbial “f all” !

TEFL is dying in Asia. Every man/ woman / trans has a BA and a CELTA these days and it doesn’t get one very far these days. Korea is one of the best places in Asia to TEFL, especially the PS system. Take it from a vet; Korea is a great place to be if you can hack the culture.