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Author Topic: Helping out colleagues  (Read 1776 times)

Offline The Arm

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Helping out colleagues
« on: November 02, 2015, 02:15:17 PM »
Has anyone else noticed that their colleagues are really, really hesitant to help each other out? 

To the point where Korean teachers who are assigned a specific job to do (particular admin work or other general organisational duties) will refuse to do something that isn't their role.

It's crazy and I've seen it a few times.  My CT literally told me that they get mad if they have to do something that 'isn't their job'.

It came up because my main CT won't be here when my renewal papers come through and I asked if another English teacher could help with it (because the head of my department doesn't speak English).  She looked at me like I had two heads.

Anyone else come across this weird phenomenon?

Offline Korea13

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Re: Helping out colleagues
« Reply #1 on: November 02, 2015, 02:26:18 PM »
It's all about greed. The main co-teacher or person that are in charge of the NET usually get some kind of extra $$$ for being the handler of the school NET. That why when another teacher are ask to help, they get all piss off.


Offline johnny russian

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Re: Helping out colleagues
« Reply #2 on: November 02, 2015, 03:05:25 PM »
it's pure laziness and selfishness masquerading as busy-ness.

that, and the tendency for a looot of people in korea to pass off other peoples' work as their own, or without giving due credit, means it's understandable that people are hesitant to help.

not only that but it seems very few favors are reciprocated here too. i've actually kinda stopped doing favors for people at work myself because of the lack of reciprocation.

"oh hey teacher can you please phone this seller on gmarket and help me out, they sent me the wrong size, it'll just be a short conversation to do a return.

Offline ChickenLegsMcGee

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Re: Helping out colleagues
« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2015, 03:10:22 PM »
just behavior that will happen to you the more you live on this blue marble.

Same goes for basically any unionized workplace back home.

I've seen someone get fired for helpingsomeone with a task.
Open your mind.

Offline meepmoopimmarobots

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Re: Helping out colleagues
« Reply #4 on: November 02, 2015, 07:24:16 PM »
I noticed that my colleagues would piss and moan literally every time they were asked to do ANYTHING by ANYONE. Like, my most evil of the evil cowteachers once cried herself into a hyperventilating fit because the department head asked her to complete some paperwork.

Didn't stop them from dumping all their crap on me at 11 PM, of course, then mocking me for being tired.

Offline MayorHaggar

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Re: Helping out colleagues
« Reply #5 on: November 02, 2015, 09:05:46 PM »
From my experience working 2 years at public schools, it felt like Koreans have zero interest in doing anything if it isn't clearly their responsibility. Koreans are obsessed with the hierarchy (each school has a hilarious flowchart showing how everyone is placed on the totem pole) and to a certain extent they are terrified of either doing something without approval from above, and they don't want to be seen as infringing on someone else's authority. But the flip side of that (there's always a flip side here to everything that is different from the West) is that if you need help with something innocuous that isn't their responsibility, they just will not care at all and won't do much to help. It's not like the West where people worry about seeming mean or not and will do a small favor for someone just to be helpful. But ask a Korean 1st grade teacher to interrupt her Maxim slurping to watch over the 3rd graders while you go hunting for some band-aids? Screw that.

The positive flip side is that you will rarely get asked to do stuff that isn't your responsibility, and you can slack off a bit more because you aren't constantly being given additional responsibilities like at a job in the West. In the US you'd be seen as unhelpful and "difficult." In Korea, as long as you play volleyball and go to the occasional hoesik, you're seen as normal even if you aren't constantly volunteering to do stuff you weren't hired to do.
« Last Edit: November 02, 2015, 09:08:34 PM by MayorHaggar »

Online Titanfallen

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Re: Helping out colleagues
« Reply #6 on: November 02, 2015, 09:14:06 PM »
I noticed that my colleagues would piss and moan literally every time they were asked to do ANYTHING by ANYONE. Like, my most evil of the evil cowteachers once cried herself into a hyperventilating fit because the department head asked her to complete some paperwork.

Didn't stop them from dumping all their crap on me at 11 PM, of course, then mocking me for being tired.

Hehe...'Cowteacher' never heard that one before lol. Keeper.
Knowing what it feels like to be in pain, is exactly why we should try to be kind to others.

Offline jjhatcher

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Re: Helping out colleagues
« Reply #7 on: November 03, 2015, 09:48:08 AM »
From my experience working 2 years at public schools, it felt like Koreans have zero interest in doing anything if it isn't clearly their responsibility. Koreans are obsessed with the hierarchy (each school has a hilarious flowchart showing how everyone is placed on the totem pole) and to a certain extent they are terrified of either doing something without approval from above, and they don't want to be seen as infringing on someone else's authority. But the flip side of that (there's always a flip side here to everything that is different from the West) is that if you need help with something innocuous that isn't their responsibility, they just will not care at all and won't do much to help. It's not like the West where people worry about seeming mean or not and will do a small favor for someone just to be helpful. But ask a Korean 1st grade teacher to interrupt her Maxim slurping to watch over the 3rd graders while you go hunting for some band-aids? Screw that.

The positive flip side is that you will rarely get asked to do stuff that isn't your responsibility, and you can slack off a bit more because you aren't constantly being given additional responsibilities like at a job in the West. In the US you'd be seen as unhelpful and "difficult." In Korea, as long as you play volleyball and go to the occasional hoesik, you're seen as normal even if you aren't constantly volunteering to do stuff you weren't hired to do.

Like that time during summer vacation (the season is important here) that i was asked to help the groundskepper mask the entire cafeteria for 2 days while he repainted it.
Oh, I was dressed for it too, in my collared shirt.