October 20, 2018, 08:30:14 AM


Author Topic: American and British English - let's work together!!  (Read 24973 times)

Offline Waygeek

  • Adventurer
  • *
  • Posts: 37
  • Gender: Female
Re: American and British Spelling - let's work together!!
« Reply #40 on: May 04, 2011, 03:15:44 PM »
We could argue and defend our own way of spelling for days on end. But it's not about us, so here's my simple take on it: American English is not the only English in the world, and neither is British English, so it's actually a great thing that the students at your school be exposed to both. I'm South African and the other native teacher at my school is American, so I always explain to students that both spelling forms are correct.

I also do the same when it comes to pronunciation. I'm not going to change my accent coz I'd despise the phoniness in me, so I just make the students aware of the different ways they might hear things being said.

At the end of the day, the students benefit from it :) The spelling or pronunciation they choose to use is up to them.

Offline eemneedah

  • Adventurer
  • *
  • Posts: 65
Re: American and British Spelling - let's work together!!
« Reply #41 on: May 04, 2011, 03:19:48 PM »
We could argue and defend our own way of spelling for days on end. But it's not about us, so here's my simple take on it: American English is not the only English in the world, and neither is British English, so it's actually a great thing that the students at your school be exposed to both. I'm South African and the other native teacher at my school is American, so I always explain to students that both spelling forms are correct.

I also do the same when it comes to pronunciation. I'm not going to change my accent coz I'd despise the phoniness in me, so I just make the students aware of the different ways they might hear things being said.

At the end of the day, the students benefit from it :) The spelling or pronunciation they choose to use is up to them.

Well said - accurate and diplomatic. Let's work together.

Offline fee

  • Adventurer
  • *
  • Posts: 38
  • Gender: Female
Re: American and British Spelling - let's work together!!
« Reply #42 on: May 04, 2011, 03:36:53 PM »
I (I'm British btw) teach American English in my classroom at public school. Last year when I worked in a hagwon, with advanced classes I touched upon some British and American differences. I've never gone hugely into depth in it though. I agree that we shouldn't correct british english and say spellings like colour are wrong (and same for teh Brits with american english) but I think it's more important to cover vocabulary and spoken english than spend time teaching 2 ways to do one thing. Perhaps if you have high level students then it's interesting for them to do. But I would never take the time to teach my students different spellings for one word every time these words come up. I remember being told when I was looking for a job and then when I went on training for that job, it is my responsibility to teach American English. There are plenty of places where I could go teach British English. Korea aint one of them.

Offline negacoca

  • Veteran
  • **
  • Posts: 120
  • Gender: Female
Re: American and British Spelling - let's work together!!
« Reply #43 on: May 04, 2011, 06:57:45 PM »
Here is a helpful link to some common differences:
http://www.englishclub.com/writing/spelling_american-english.htm

I'm an American. 

I recognized roughly 3/4s of the British spellings on the list as being correct.

If I was shown only the American spellings, asked if those words were spelled differently in England, and asked about the British spellings, I could have answered with certainty for about 1/4 of the words.

Anyone else?

Offline heyitslep

  • Super Waygook
  • ***
  • Posts: 253
  • Gender: Male
Re: American and British Spelling - let's work together!!
« Reply #44 on: May 04, 2011, 07:16:48 PM »
Let's just go full retard and teach them Middle English, yeah?

Offline singletrackmind

  • Veteran
  • **
  • Posts: 192
  • Gender: Male
Re: American and British Spelling - let's work together!!
« Reply #45 on: May 04, 2011, 07:21:04 PM »
With the whole "two thousand and eleven" thing, that's actually wrong. I'm pretty positive about this. It's mathmatical language, you don't put an "and" in numbers.

You may be positive but you are the one who is wrong, I don't think anybody including British, Americans, Canadians, South Africans etc....say 'one hundred one' do they?? It's 'one hundred and one' or 'Seven hundred and sixty four' not 'seven hundred sixty four'

Cheers
Nope, its one hundred one.  That's how I was taught and that's how I'll teach it.  Also, I read an article by some English professor about saying the year.  According to him, two thousand eleven is incorrect.  It should be spoken as twenty eleven.  It's not really a big deal to me, though.

Offline toddt

  • Adventurer
  • *
  • Posts: 59
  • Gender: Male
Re: American and British Spelling - let's work together!!
« Reply #46 on: May 04, 2011, 10:30:55 PM »
I couldn't agree more about working together. And you make a good point about the students visiting public school teachers during the day and learning one way to speak certain sentences or write certain words, and then visiting hagwon teachers after school and learning a second. I think we should present our preferred ways, but let it be up to the students to decide with version they prefer. I suppose we can thank Benjamin Franklin for this discrepancy.

The numbers thing is a bit different. It is incorrect to add "and" when saying "2011." Just like 745,893 is, when written, seven hundred forty-three thousand, eight hundred ninety-three.

And the date, in my opinion is Wednesday, May 4th, 2011. I think students need to practise saying the days of the week, so to omit them and say only 4th of May, 2011 is insufficient for their learning. 

Offline WorkingTitle3484

  • Expert Waygook
  • ****
  • Posts: 645
  • Gender: Male
Re: American and British Spelling - let's work together!!
« Reply #47 on: May 04, 2011, 10:57:10 PM »
I'm American, and I don't think it'll be hard to allow both spellings (US and non-US English) in my classes.  In my 3 years, I've never had any students come up to me questioning the proper spelling of a 'disputed' word.

However, if they do, I'll gladly tell them there are more ways to spell a certain word, unless of course if it's a grossly nicrorect splelgni.  I hear the message of the OP's intent, and I believe he's looking for or suggesting a mind-meeting consensus amongst Native (or is it Guest now?) English Teachers.
You get what you give :)

Offline ironopolis

  • Expert Waygook
  • ****
  • Posts: 638
Re: American and British Spelling - let's work together!!
« Reply #48 on: May 04, 2011, 11:05:44 PM »
Whenever the kids see something spelled differently (color/colour) or a word used differently (football/soccer), I take ten seconds to say, "Oh, in America, they say that" or "Oh, in England, they spell it that way" and move on. 



That's pretty close to my approach - let them be aware of the differing acceptable versions but move on quickly and not make an unnecessary big deal about it.

If anything, one thing I'd like to try and change a little in Koreans when they're learning English is the, what I think ridiculous and totally exaggerated perception that American English and British English are like two completely different languages and people who know one will be completely lost when faced with the other. With elementary kids I think this is perhaps best achieved by not making too big a deal of differences. With teachers and other adults I often point out that US and UK leaders don't have interpreters when they meet and that I, from Britain, have never ever had any trouble communicating with any of the dozens of Americans I've had as friends or acquaintances over the years, at least no more than I might have with someone with a different dialect in my own country or than they might have with someone with a different Korean dialect - i.e. none at all and when you encounter the odd word you say differently it's either immediately apparent or you figure it out between yourselves very quickly.
« Last Edit: May 04, 2011, 11:08:39 PM by ironopolis »

Offline atmosphere

  • Veteran
  • **
  • Posts: 82
  • Gender: Male
Re: American and British Spelling - let's work together!!
« Reply #49 on: May 05, 2011, 10:31:23 AM »
I'm English and use American spellings. There's enough confusion in my classroom as it is.

Offline asah

  • Waygookin
  • *
  • Posts: 10
  • Gender: Female
Re: American and British Spelling - let's work together!!
« Reply #50 on: May 09, 2011, 02:44:30 PM »
Korean public schools use American English in their curriculum, so I think it makes the most sense to teach in American English if you're in that setting. Especially if you want to consider their exam scores. And in my experience, ESL learners have expressed an easier time understanding American English because of the pop culture influence from movies and music. I'm not saying that one is right or wrong or better, but I think you have to think about what is most relevant for your students. Then if various forms of English come up in spelling or pronunciation, just explain. Not a big deal.


Ochodnid

  • Guest
Re: American and British Spelling - let's work together!!
« Reply #51 on: May 09, 2011, 02:54:57 PM »
I am American, but I can safely say I know roughly 80% of the differences between US-UK English. I learned a lot of them living in Europe, since most of them learn British English. I show my students the differences sometimes between the two types, but most do not care to know the difference.

90% of my students like American English. They like the way it sounds or the way it is spelled. 5% like the British English and the remaining 5% don't care. I took a pole the first two weeks of class to get an idea on what they knew and learned. I had a handout on a few of the different spelling and we watch a short video on comparing US-UK English.

I try to avoid much British English, unless asked. As stated above,
Quote
I'm English and use American spellings. There's enough confusion in my classroom as it is.

I think 95% of my students' heads would explode explaining the differences in verb conjugation. I can hear them now, "Teacher! Learned and Learnt are the same! NO!"

Offline Brirish

  • Veteran
  • **
  • Posts: 90
  • Gender: Male
Re: American and British Spelling - let's work together!!
« Reply #52 on: May 11, 2011, 01:37:18 PM »
The numbers thing is a bit different. It is incorrect to add "and" when saying "2011." Just like 745,893 is, when written, seven hundred forty-three thousand, eight hundred ninety-three.


Yes, in America.

In other parts of the English-speaking world, however, the rule is different. In other parts of the world, you do add an "and." You learnt it one way, and it was and is correct, but only in that "version" of English. That does not mean it is automatically correct for speakers of different forms of native English. That's exactly what this thread is about. There are various ways of writing, speaking and using English that can all be correct - they are just different "forms" of the language. If we can't recognise this among ourselves, how can we hope to impart this balanced, educated and reasonable view to our students?

Offline Bean

  • Waygookin
  • *
  • Posts: 10
  • Gender: Female
Re: American and British Spelling - let's work together!!
« Reply #53 on: May 11, 2011, 03:02:24 PM »
I am an American. I believe you should make an effort to teach the English that the country has adopted. This is the English they are most likely to find in their texts, in their exams, etc. Korea has adopted American English and so that is what I teach. I do however, stop to explain the different names for items in British English. Spelling - I wouldn't even start down that path. They already have enough on their plates...and really - someone using British English would absolutely understand the American spelling.

I taught in Prague for a year before coming here and in Prague, they prefer British English, so that it what I taught. It is really about your "client".

My friends who came here with me from Prague are British and they are teaching American English here. They got a kick out of my struggles with learning British English in Prague and I am enjoying their having to figure out all the American lingo here.


Ochodnid

  • Guest
Re: American and British Spelling - let's work together!!
« Reply #54 on: May 11, 2011, 03:12:32 PM »
Quote
I believe you should make an effort to teach the English that the country has adopted.

I agree with you here. I am American, but I had to drop a lot of American-English tendencies while living in Germany. They tend to prefer British-English, but it is changing in some areas. It was hard for me at times. I cannot speak with a fluent British accent and I've tried so hard lol. I can switch between a my regional American accent, a more standard American accent, and a North-German accent. But I cannot do a British accent outside of doing single words. Examples - Water, bottle, aluminum, etc.

I was choosing between Austria and South Korea. It came down to two things, money and accent. In Austria, I would make less money and have to teach British-English. In Korea, I can teach American English. I really wish I was in Austria at times though. I speak their language  :'(

Offline stevospec1

  • Waygookin
  • *
  • Posts: 12
  • Gender: Male
Re: American and British Spelling - let's work together!!
« Reply #55 on: May 11, 2011, 03:34:43 PM »
I didnt read all of the posts but if this was already stated then my apologizes. But there are so many variations in English.The only way you can say whether that variant is right or wrong is by what the target audience is expecting.

Offline flasyb

  • Hero of Waygookistan
  • *****
  • Posts: 1901
  • Gender: Male
Re: American and British Spelling - let's work together!!
« Reply #56 on: May 11, 2011, 03:39:48 PM »
Quote
Quote
I believe you should make an effort to teach the English that the country has adopted.

I agree with you here. I am American, but I had to drop a lot of American-English tendencies while living in Germany. They tend to prefer British-English, but it is changing in some areas. It was hard for me at times. I cannot speak with a fluent British accent and I've tried so hard lol. I can switch between a my regional American accent, a more standard American accent, and a North-German accent. But I cannot do a British accent outside of doing single words. Examples - Water, bottle, aluminum, etc.

I was choosing between Austria and South Korea. It came down to two things, money and accent. In Austria, I would make less money and have to teach British-English. In Korea, I can teach American English. I really wish I was in Austria at times though. I speak their language 

I like the idea of people being able to "do" other accents. I mean, don't get me wrong, some people are great with accents. Being English, I know that my attempts to sound American would be laughable and having quite a lot of American friends, I know for a fact that their English accents are awful. Just awful. Don't worry about your accent. Speak slower and clearer and that will help regardless of the accent you have. I agree with the "teach the English that the country you're in has adopted" idea though. Makes sense.
In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.

We are not "guests" in Korea. Korea didn't invite us over for Pimms in the garden. We are paid employees.

Offline epburton84

  • Explorer
  • *
  • Posts: 8
  • Gender: Male
Re: American and British Spelling - let's work together!!
« Reply #57 on: May 11, 2011, 03:54:29 PM »
With the whole "two thousand and eleven" thing, that's actually wrong. I'm pretty positive about this. It's mathmatical language, you don't put an "and" in numbers.

In Britain, and many other countries, we say two thousand and eleven. It's not wrong, it's just different from what you are used to. Same in numbers/counting. You would say 'one hundred one', and I would say 'one hundred and one'. Again, we are both right. Usually when we want to signify a decimal in maths (notice we say 'maths', not 'math'?), we would say 'point'. If we were to use fractions, we would say 'and'. So, perhaps confusingly, we would say 'one hundred and one point seven five', or 'one hundred and one and three quarters'. I know that you would say it differently, but that is not to say that all other ways are incorrect.

As far as using different spellings, pronunciations, and vocabulary in the classroom in concerned, I appreciate the opinion that it's generally easier to stick to American English, as this is the form of English with which our students are likely to be most familiar. However, I've been told that part of our reason for being here is to bring part of our cultures to the Korean classroom. If the Korean government, or SMOE or EPIK or whoever expected us to teach American English exclusively, irrespective of our nationalities, then why didn't they employ only North American teachers?

As a Brit who has read and studied a fair amount of American literature and (obviously) watched a lot of American films and dramas, I'm pretty clued-up on the differences between American and British English. I teach my students the words I use at home, but whenever there is an obvious discrepancy between spellings or pronunciations, or even terminology, I will explain that Americans say that, and I say this.

My students know I'm from Britain. Most of them will choose to ignore my 'alternative' spellings and terminology and stick to what they know/prefer. However, some of the more able students may start to build an understanding of the differences between various English-speaking cultures. We are here to teach the language that is native to us. We should be mindful that students may have been taught certain words or spellings, and briefly explain discrepancies when they arise, but that shouldn't mean we attempt to teach a language that is not our own.

Ochodnid

  • Guest
Re: American and British Spelling - let's work together!!
« Reply #58 on: May 11, 2011, 04:00:59 PM »
Quote
I like the idea of people being able to "do" other accents. I mean, don't get me wrong, some people are great with accents. Being English, I know that my attempts to sound American would be laughable and having quite a lot of American friends, I know for a fact that their English accents are awful. Just awful. Don't worry about your accent. Speak slower and clearer and that will help regardless of the accent you have. I agree with the "teach the English that the country you're in has adopted" idea though. Makes sense.

I studied phonetics, so it makes it a lot easier. I have been speaking German since I was little and I have German relatives. I perfected my German accent in Germany. You just need to learn where they pronounce things in their mouths. I can speak in my German accent for hours. I confuse westerners here in Korea doing it. I will meet them and use my accent for a while and switch. I use to use it in Germany to avoid speaking too much English with Americans. For my "standard" use accent, I cut out a lot of ways we pronounce things from my region.

My regional accent has changed a lot over the years. I have family from Canada and they always tried to mimic out accents. They said I was the only one they could understand easily out of my family in the US. They also mentioned it became easier to understand over the years. I have been trying to remove some of the things that make me harder to understand.

Offline southcareer

  • Veteran
  • **
  • Posts: 105
  • Gender: Male
Re: American and British Spelling - let's work together!!
« Reply #59 on: May 13, 2011, 08:28:26 AM »
With the whole "two thousand and eleven" thing, that's actually wrong. I'm pretty positive about this. It's mathmatical language, you don't put an "and" in numbers.

By saying "it's mathematical language" you feign to appeal to a rule that doesn't exist.  You simply mean, "I don't do it/ I am not used to hearing it".  Many people do put an 'and' in numbers.  What are you talking about?