August 19, 2017, 08:14:15 PM


Author Topic: countries/languages/world music guessing game  (Read 5587 times)

Offline maximmm

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countries/languages/world music guessing game
« on: May 12, 2016, 02:25:55 AM »
https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B__OH0eUDwWHUExkXzZlOVd5MFk

200 mb

My quest to have students learn about different countries and about the world at large continues - hence I'm using another world map  -

All of the instructions are on the first slide.

The intro is a bit long - perhaps too long - so skip it if you like ;)

This game is interesting because you can play this game not just with students but also your friends - you might learn quite a bit about how much they know about the world at large, as well as how good they are at telling languages apart. 

Enjoy

PS.  Still working on the space exploration game - my epic follow up to the x-men bomb game. 
« Last Edit: May 12, 2016, 05:22:29 PM by maximmm »
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Offline Whatgook

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Re: countries/languages/world music guessing game
« Reply #1 on: May 12, 2016, 12:48:22 PM »
Dude you've become quite the artist. i used your x-men game with my grade 6's and I shall be using this with them too!

Cheers!

Offline maximmm

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Re: countries/languages/world music guessing game
« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2016, 01:27:42 PM »
Dude you've become quite the artist. i used your x-men game with my grade 6's and I shall be using this with them too!

Cheers!

Thanks - I'm going to make one more improvement to this game today (where the videos will all be bigger and more centered -and it will be possible to play all 3 videos per slide without going back to the main map) - will post an update later

Cheers
« Last Edit: May 12, 2016, 02:37:24 PM by maximmm »
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Offline maximmm

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Re: countries/languages/world music guessing game
« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2016, 05:19:23 PM »
The game has been fixed (it wasn't broken per se but...)

Font size for answers has been increased.
There was one song that played in two slides - that has been fixed and a Korean song was added (there were only 2 before - now there are 3 as is the case for most other countries - except for Greenland - I'm using 2 songs from Greenland and 4 from Canada).

Videos have now been centered and enlarged - and you can now play all 3 videos without having to go back to the main map.

Here is the updated version - https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B__OH0eUDwWHUExkXzZlOVd5MFk

You'll be amazed just how little students know about the world -
I've played an early variation of this game 2 days ago.  I asked my students if they have ever seen a foreign movie or listened to foreign music - most of them said no.  Now, I know that's not true, since most of them do know one or two American singers and they have certainly seen enough American films, but I'd venture to say that most of them have never heard Hindi, Russian, French, etc songs.  In other words, foreign language to them truly is foreign and in many cases they don't even know what people in other countries look like. 

It's worse than that - in one case, two of my students upon seeing/listening to the 2ne1 song guessed that they were Chinese singing in Chinese.

Cheers.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2016, 06:13:49 PM by maximmm »
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Offline Samteachercheongdo

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Re: countries/languages/world music guessing game
« Reply #4 on: May 16, 2016, 01:35:29 PM »
What are the answers?

Offline maximmm

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Re: countries/languages/world music guessing game
« Reply #5 on: May 16, 2016, 02:19:27 PM »
What are the answers?

after the song finishes playing, under one of the icons an 'answer' box should pop up - if you click on it, the answer will be revealed. 
« Last Edit: May 16, 2016, 05:00:50 PM by maximmm »
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Offline Whatgook

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Re: countries/languages/world music guessing game
« Reply #6 on: May 31, 2016, 11:17:02 AM »
Hi Maximm,

This looks great, i loved your x-men game. however, it doesn't work for me. I'm on the map, and I click a country, no problem. However, then there's no links in the icons. Whenever I click them, it just goes to the nxt country. Any ideas?

Thanks

Offline maximmm

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Re: countries/languages/world music guessing game
« Reply #7 on: May 31, 2016, 11:36:40 AM »
Hi Maximm,

This looks great, i loved your x-men game. however, it doesn't work for me. I'm on the map, and I click a country, no problem. However, then there's no links in the icons. Whenever I click them, it just goes to the nxt country. Any ideas?

Thanks


I've just downloaded the game again to see if there are any errors - everything still works fine.

Perhaps try it via one of the free microsoft PPT viewers?  At least then you can rule out a problem with the PPT software on your end. 

I should note that I had a few problems with my PPT on several school computers - if they don't have certain codecs installed, audio/video might not work. 
Still, hyperlinks worked on all computers, so the problem you are experiencing is somewhat unusual. 

I should say,

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Offline meghmur

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Re: countries/languages/world music guessing game
« Reply #8 on: June 20, 2016, 03:31:08 PM »
Im having trouble since the video doesnt go away after i play it so i cant see the answers or click the other videos... am i hitting something wrong? or is there an easy fix? Im on korean ppt of course, otherwise id probably be able to play around with it

Offline maximmm

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Re: countries/languages/world music guessing game
« Reply #9 on: June 20, 2016, 06:58:24 PM »
Im having trouble since the video doesnt go away after i play it so i cant see the answers or click the other videos... am i hitting something wrong? or is there an easy fix? Im on korean ppt of course, otherwise id probably be able to play around with it

Try opening it via PPT viewer (download it from the microsoft site) and let me know if the problem persists.

Otherwise, just follow the instructions on the first slide, it should work (I've just downloaded the file and checked to make sure nothing has been changed). 
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Offline toojue

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Re: countries/languages/world music guessing game
« Reply #10 on: June 27, 2016, 07:44:00 PM »
My students loved your game!  They would like to know the artists/name of song.  If possible, do you have a general list?

Thanks much for all your hard work and talent!

Offline maximmm

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Re: countries/languages/world music guessing game
« Reply #11 on: June 27, 2016, 08:27:10 PM »
That could be a bit of a problem.  After I downloaded them from youtube, I changed the file names to 'China/Korea/etc). 
I still have the full songs on my PC (I'm not sure if the unused portions were deleted by PPT upon compression).  I can recall around 30-40 percent of the singers/songs - and I probably can find others again as well.  Let me know which country singers/songs interest you in particular and I'll get back to you.

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Offline pandaclaus88

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Re: countries/languages/world music guessing game
« Reply #12 on: April 18, 2017, 03:20:30 PM »
so good~

Offline damocha

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Re: countries/languages/world music guessing game
« Reply #13 on: April 19, 2017, 11:38:57 AM »
I tried to download the updated version but it says there is a network error. Any ideas what's going on?

Offline maximmm

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Re: countries/languages/world music guessing game
« Reply #14 on: April 21, 2017, 02:07:55 PM »
I tried to download the updated version but it says there is a network error. Any ideas what's going on?

The link in the first post leads to the updated version.

Cheers.
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Offline actualstarfish

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Re: countries/languages/world music guessing game
« Reply #15 on: April 21, 2017, 02:42:38 PM »
I tried to download the updated version but it says there is a network error. Any ideas what's going on?

Just tried it and it worked for me. Thanks for the great idea maximmm! I'm coming up on the last few months of my time at my schools and am growing tired of trying to convince my Japanese co-teachers to use communicative activities in class that they then proceed to ruin by translating or removing anything remotely fun/challenging. I'm gonna try to convince them to allow some "cultural" lessons such as these instead. If they won't allow me to teach English effectively, then at the very least I want my students to gain an interest in the wider world and enjoy themselves while doing so dammit.

Offline maximmm

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Re: countries/languages/world music guessing game
« Reply #16 on: April 21, 2017, 03:20:23 PM »
I tried to download the updated version but it says there is a network error. Any ideas what's going on?

Just tried it and it worked for me. Thanks for the great idea maximmm! I'm coming up on the last few months of my time at my schools and am growing tired of trying to convince my Japanese co-teachers to use communicative activities in class that they then proceed to ruin by translating or removing anything remotely fun/challenging. I'm gonna try to convince them to allow some "cultural" lessons such as these instead. If they won't allow me to teach English effectively, then at the very least I want my students to gain an interest in the wider world and enjoy themselves while doing so dammit.

No problem.  I'm struggling with my new co-teacher this year as well, so I hear you.
Having said that, I played this game again a few weeks ago, and it worked out great.  I played it twice, actually - with the same class.  It was no less fun during the second time (a week later), and I was pleased to see that students actually remembered what some of the countries were famous for, as well as the country/language for some of the repeated songs (they really struggled during the first playthrough). 

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Offline actualstarfish

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Re: countries/languages/world music guessing game
« Reply #17 on: April 28, 2017, 01:12:09 PM »
Just wanted to report that this went over extremely well. I was scheduled to have a few team teaching lessons with a Japanese English teacher yesterday and she didn't know what to do for 40 minutes, so I was able to shoehorn this in for three classes. It blew the Japanese teacher's mind. She said she saw students participating who usually sleep in class or don't care about English. I had a similar reaction when I played a Pokemon bomb game last year. Granted, these sort of games are more edutainment than teaching, but last minute games like this are the best I can do when I'm given the rare chance to do something I want to. Japan's reactionary educational environment is very resistant to change. I'm able to slip in games like this because they easily catch the students' attention and don't require a big shift in learner expectations.

Side note: I've taught English in Korea before and am now teaching in Japan. I had thought that English teaching methodology was Korea was outdated and mostly ineffective, but that was before I came to Japan. If English teaching in Korea is in the bronze age, Japan is in the stone age. The Japanese English teachers' ideas of a good English lesson involve silently reading weird English sentences with occasional errors from an English textbook (the textbook having been thrown together haphazardly by Japanese people who don't speak English well), having students listen to poor pronunciation of those sentences, then having students complete worksheets where they translate words from English to Japanese and vice versa. Class over, rinse and repeat. Often the students speak zero words of English in an entire lesson. The lessons themselves are conducted 95% in Japanese. In addition to not speaking the language or doing anything task-based, these students aren't used to playing games or doing group activities at all.

What I'm getting at is that games like this that involve students working in groups and having fun while learning is radical thinking here in Japan. Bomb games, with all their flaws, are still way better than the kind of teaching that happens here. Keep in mind that Japanese classrooms have almost zero technology available (I have to reserve a special AV room to use my computer). It's no wonder that the students develop a disregard for English; their English classes are terrible. I currently teach high school and have students who started learning English in 5th grade elementary who, by the time they come to my class, have a hard time understanding and writing "How are you today?". That means they have been studying English for at least five years before they came to my class. What a waste!

I am fortunate enough to have TEFL experience outside of Korea and Japan so I have a fairly strong grasp of what effective English teaching is as well as some of the current pedagogical trends and wow, sometimes it is disheartening to see what goes on here in the far East.

Got a bit sidetracked there so anyways, thanks again maximmm and I'll be looking for ways to find more time to play this again in the future. Cheers
« Last Edit: April 28, 2017, 01:25:08 PM by actualstarfish »

Offline maximmm

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Re: countries/languages/world music guessing game
« Reply #18 on: April 28, 2017, 01:49:07 PM »


Side note: I've taught English in Korea before and am now teaching in Japan. I had thought that English teaching methodology was Korea was outdated and mostly ineffective, but that was before I came to Japan. If English teaching in Korea is in the bronze age, Japan is in the stone age. The Japanese English teachers' ideas of a good English lesson involve silently reading weird English sentences with occasional errors from an English textbook (the textbook having been thrown together haphazardly by Japanese people who don't speak English well), having students listen to poor pronunciation of those sentences, then having students complete worksheets where they translate words from English to Japanese and vice versa. Class over, rinse and repeat. Often the students speak zero words of English in an entire lesson. The lessons themselves are conducted 95% in Japanese. In addition to not speaking the language or doing anything task-based, these students aren't used to playing games or doing group activities at all.

What I'm getting at is that games like this that involve students working in groups and having fun while learning is radical thinking here in Japan. Bomb games, with all their flaws, are still way better than the kind of teaching that happens here. Keep in mind that Japanese classrooms have almost zero technology available (I have to reserve a special AV room to use my computer). It's no wonder that the students develop a disregard for English; their English classes are terrible. I currently teach high school and have students who started learning English in 5th grade elementary who, by the time they come to my class, have a hard time understanding and writing "How are you today?". That means they have been studying English for at least five years before they came to my class. What a waste!

I am fortunate enough to have TEFL experience outside of Korea and Japan so I have a fairly strong grasp of what effective English teaching is as well as some of the current pedagogical trends and wow, sometimes it is disheartening to see what goes on here in the far East.

Got a bit sidetracked there so anyways, thanks again maximmm and I'll be looking for ways to find more time to play this again in the future. Cheers

Yeah - I heard that in Japan they use NETs as human tape recorders.  Curiously enough, my new co-teacher at my main school (with whom I have argued on many occasions and have now officially given up, since the upper management support her position 100%) has turned me into a human tape recorder as well - meanwhile, she can barely string two English words together.  I'm not sure if this is a new trend - but for now, my other two schools still let me do what I do. 

By the way, because I have pretty small after school classes, each student played on his/her own - no teams.

You know, there is a way to turn bomb games into the whole class activity - where every student participates - all you need to do is do a bit of minor PPT editing.  Remove all negative points/Change/Bomb/etc - only leave positive points - then get all students to write the answer the each question - and get them to add points if they get the right answer.  It would work like Golden Bell - but with a theme (since most bomb games have a theme).  Oh, and students should take turns when selecting the question on the main game slide. 

Otherwise, take a look at my other PPTS - http://www.waygook.org/index.php/topic,102847.0.html

My speed games are particularly good, IMHO - though I'm currently working on making them a bit more all-class inclusive. 

BTW - in the near future, I plan to make another game similar to the world music one (in the sense that it cannot be edited to fit other topics) - it will feature a number of puzzles from professor Layton games (logic/word problems), while the main selection slide will feature body parts (world music featured a map). 

« Last Edit: April 28, 2017, 01:59:15 PM by maximmm »
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Offline actualstarfish

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Re: countries/languages/world music guessing game
« Reply #19 on: May 08, 2017, 04:43:38 PM »

Yeah - I heard that in Japan they use NETs as human tape recorders.  Curiously enough, my new co-teacher at my main school (with whom I have argued on many occasions and have now officially given up, since the upper management support her position 100%) has turned me into a human tape recorder as well - meanwhile, she can barely string two English words together.  I'm not sure if this is a new trend - but for now, my other two schools still let me do what I do. 

By the way, because I have pretty small after school classes, each student played on his/her own - no teams.

You know, there is a way to turn bomb games into the whole class activity - where every student participates - all you need to do is do a bit of minor PPT editing.  Remove all negative points/Change/Bomb/etc - only leave positive points - then get all students to write the answer the each question - and get them to add points if they get the right answer.  It would work like Golden Bell - but with a theme (since most bomb games have a theme).  Oh, and students should take turns when selecting the question on the main game slide. 

Otherwise, take a look at my other PPTS - http://www.waygook.org/index.php/topic,102847.0.html

My speed games are particularly good, IMHO - though I'm currently working on making them a bit more all-class inclusive. 

BTW - in the near future, I plan to make another game similar to the world music one (in the sense that it cannot be edited to fit other topics) - it will feature a number of puzzles from professor Layton games (logic/word problems), while the main selection slide will feature body parts (world music featured a map).

Thanks for the ideas. I may give the whole class bomb game suggestion a try for a smaller, higher level class sometime. My students are generally very low level and some have trouble with writing, which is why having them work in groups is better for the moment since they can help each other with spelling. Otherwise, I could see my students just writing answers in katakana or spelling them out poorly in romaji (Japanese students do this often because many Japanese keyboards use romaji as the input and they aren't taught the difference between that and English). I think it would take too long to walk around and check individual answers every round to make sure they are spelled correctly and aren't lying (which they do just as often as my Korean students did, if not more haha). For example, even though the World Music game listed the countries and languages in English for the students to reference, and I had them written on the board and reviewed them before playing, some students still wrote answers in katakana and the Japanese English teacher would've accepted them if I wasn't there to tell her no. The Japanese English teachers use katakana so often in their own English classes, especially for pronunciation (cringe), that the students tend to think it is acceptable. I'd also prefer a way to get the students speaking more, since they get so few chances to do it otherwise. But that would work in a smaller, writing-focused class for my students.

There is a lot of the tape recorder stuff in Japan. I'd almost be okay with it if the classes were going well enough enough that my skills weren't needed, but wow they are bad. The sad part is that I have some qualifications and experience, and am probably more capable of teaching English than most of the Japanese English teachers are. Yet, I am consistently relegated to being a tape recorder and rarely given any opportunities for serious input. Most foreign teachers in my program are inexperienced and don't know any better, so there are few people like myself who are aware of what is actually going on. All I can do is stand back and smile through gritted teeth at all the poor lessons and incorrect English being taught. It's like I'm standing on front of a slowly burning house with a fire truck and a hose, but am forbidden to use it, and instead told to pose and appear important, and maybe release a spritz or two to make it look like I'm accomplishing something. Incidentally, that metaphor kind of describes the trajectory of Japan as a whole since the bubble period ended. But this is all a discussion for another topic. Apologies for ranting  ;D

 

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