November 19, 2017, 02:52:14 PM

Author Topic: Vocabulary for Korean Learners!  (Read 12487 times)

Online eggieguffer

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Re: Vocabulary for Korean Learners!
« Reply #40 on: September 13, 2017, 01:10:05 PM »
Quote
영어로 말하세요 = Speak in English, please

Pretty ironic telling the students to speak in English in Korean. All that classroom language would be better in English. It's straightforward, can be backed up with gestures, is often
repeated and has a clear context. Text book comprehensible input.

Ok. Agreed.

But as we're in a thread about Korean, some might be curious how say things in Korean. In order to beef up their knowledge. Or just for curiosity's sake. Or to understand what a CT might be saying. Or to aid extremely low-level students. Or to be expeditious when time is short. You never know  :smiley:

Sure, as long as they don't do it in class time. Some people on here seem to use the students for Korean lessons.  You'd have to be pretty low level not to understand 'sit down' 'stand up' and 'open your books' with gestures.
« Last Edit: September 13, 2017, 01:12:06 PM by eggieguffer »

Offline DMZabductee

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Re: Vocabulary for Korean Learners!
« Reply #41 on: September 13, 2017, 03:30:02 PM »
Quote
영어로 말하세요 = Speak in English, please

Pretty ironic telling the students to speak in English in Korean. All that classroom language would be better in English. It's straightforward, can be backed up with gestures, is often
repeated and has a clear context. Text book comprehensible input.

Ok. Agreed.

But as we're in a thread about Korean, some might be curious how say things in Korean. In order to beef up their knowledge. Or just for curiosity's sake. Or to understand what a CT might be saying. Or to aid extremely low-level students. Or to be expeditious when time is short. You never know  :smiley:

Sure, as long as they don't do it in class time. Some people on here seem to use the students for Korean lessons.  You'd have to be pretty low level not to understand 'sit down' 'stand up' and 'open your books' with gestures.

For sure. And of course school class time shouldn't be used for 'Korean practice'  by the NET. 100%.

But in all honesty, and with all respect to the full immersion school of thought, I think some instances are better dealt with in (sparing) Korean.

In a perfect world I'd be working with a helpful and motivated CT. But that's not the case. Most of the time I teach alone, usually CT is not present or just not aware of what's going on, so I'm left to play both roles. I do what I need to do to make my plans, the lesson and the class in general run smoothly. If that involves a couple sentences in Korean here and there to quash misbehavior or facilitate an activity, so be it.

I'm very often met with stares of either (willful) ignorance or misunderstanding when I give some command in English that is out of the ordinary. Not the  'sit down', 'stand up' kind of stuff, either. Obviously they know that and just feign ignorance to be obtuse when they say they don't understand. In the cases where they truly don't understand something though, a little Korean is not harmful and actually helps the class run more smoothly. I'm not talking paragraphs of Korean here, just a couple short commands.

Eventually the goal is to do everything in English, of course. We're working on it. But until that day, a little bit of Korean spoken by the NET (as opposed to the Korean CT who would, in theory, be speaking and translating some anyway) is not the end of the world.

And I'm not trying to be argumentative, this is just my perspective. If you have some advice or constructive criticism, I'd be glad to hear it. Really  :smiley:

Online eggieguffer

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Re: Vocabulary for Korean Learners!
« Reply #42 on: September 13, 2017, 03:35:22 PM »
Quote
영어로 말하세요 = Speak in English, please

Pretty ironic telling the students to speak in English in Korean. All that classroom language would be better in English. It's straightforward, can be backed up with gestures, is often
repeated and has a clear context. Text book comprehensible input.

Ok. Agreed.

But as we're in a thread about Korean, some might be curious how say things in Korean. In order to beef up their knowledge. Or just for curiosity's sake. Or to understand what a CT might be saying. Or to aid extremely low-level students. Or to be expeditious when time is short. You never know  :smiley:

Sure, as long as they don't do it in class time. Some people on here seem to use the students for Korean lessons.  You'd have to be pretty low level not to understand 'sit down' 'stand up' and 'open your books' with gestures.

For sure. And of course school class time shouldn't be used for 'Korean practice'  by the NET. 100%.

But in all honesty, and with all respect to the full immersion school of thought, I think some instances are better dealt with in (sparing) Korean.

In a perfect world I'd be working with a helpful and motivated CT. But that's not the case. Most of the time I teach alone, usually CT is not present or just not aware of what's going on, so I'm left to play both roles. I do what I need to do to make my plans, the lesson and the class in general run smoothly. If that involves a couple sentences in Korean here and there to quash misbehavior or facilitate an activity, so be it.

I'm very often met with stares of either (willful) ignorance or misunderstanding when I give some command in English that is out of the ordinary. Not the  'sit down', 'stand up' kind of stuff, either. Obviously they know that and just feign ignorance to be obtuse when they say they don't understand. In the cases where they truly don't understand something though, a little Korean is not harmful and actually helps the class run more smoothly. I'm not talking paragraphs of Korean here, just a couple short commands.

Eventually the goal is to do everything in English, of course. We're working on it. But until that day, a little bit of Korean spoken by the NET (as opposed to the Korean CT who would, in theory, be speaking and translating some anyway) is not the end of the world.

And I'm not trying to be argumentative, this is just my perspective. If you have some advice or constructive criticism, I'd be glad to hear it. Really  :smiley:

Stick with what you're doing it sounds fine. I've never been a full immersion for low levels advocate myself. I get frustrated sometimes though when I try to train Korean teachers to use classroom language in English and ask me why they should bother when their NET doesn't even use it.

Offline internationalteacher

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Re: Vocabulary for Korean Learners!
« Reply #43 on: October 14, 2017, 07:27:32 PM »
if you can't be a NET and speak English in class all the time for low levels, then you don't know how to teach English. You shouldn't be speaking Korean since you don't know if what you are saying is correct. Your co-teacher speaks Korean so get her to explain certain things that will allow students to thereafter understand what the NET teacher is saying.

Online eggieguffer

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Re: Vocabulary for Korean Learners!
« Reply #44 on: October 14, 2017, 09:42:47 PM »
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if you can't be a NET and speak English in class all the time for low levels, then you don't know how to teach English.

I tend to agree with you but as a NET in the public school system you'd be swimming against the tide. As soon as a kid claims they don't understand what you're saying in English the CT will chime in and claim the kids are totally lost/losing motivation etc...and need a translation. The only way the kids will get used to learning English in English is with a well trained NET and no co-teacher.

Offline internationalteacher

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Re: Vocabulary for Korean Learners!
« Reply #45 on: October 14, 2017, 10:54:06 PM »
A good ESL lesson would be pitched so that the students could mostly understand what the teacher is on about. If you try to teach much too difficult stuff then yes you will be swimming against the tide. If you pitch it just right and keep asking comprehension questions and moving the class at a suitable pace then the students should all understand. I agree that a well-trained NET would be the best solution but unfortunately Korea lets almost anyone with any BA degree straight out of college teach! you have to be a NET but you don't have to be well trained at all! This is part of the problem I think. Also lack of motivation stems from having classes too frequently and for too long a time.