November 22, 2017, 11:55:53 AM

Author Topic: How do You Beat Humidity in Korea????  (Read 3219 times)

Offline traversing

  • Veteran
  • **
  • Posts: 102
Re: How do You Beat Humidity in Korea????
« Reply #20 on: July 17, 2017, 02:05:44 PM »
It's not as big of a deal as you're making it out to be, I promise you.

This. They are given money specifically for NET's and making living easier. My school recently had money so they asked me what I needed. I had trouble thinking and could only think of curtains, so they bought a water filter/dispenser, and an electric kettle as well as the curtains.

I was a bit stressed about how much curtains would cost, so I just asked for some that would cover the rest of the windows that the old ones didn't. But they refused and insisted on buying complete new ones. The teacher in charge of me said "it's okay because if you  don't stay the next teacher will use them." I love my curtains, my room actually gets dark at night now. I made a much bigger deal out of it than it was.

I get that other schools have different attitudes, but if they offer to get you something without you asking for it, that means they have been given money for it. If they hassle you about it, then they are just being silly and you should just say how nice it is and thank them. Anything more than that just let it roll off your back.

Online Mr.DeMartino

  • The Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 3650
  • Gender: Male
Re: How do You Beat Humidity in Korea????
« Reply #21 on: July 17, 2017, 02:27:53 PM »
Quote
4. My house has no decent Aircon- and although my coteacher has offered to get me a small unit, I turned them down because the only time I used aircon in Korea is during Rainy season. For the rest of the time I am fine with just a fan.

Other OP issues:

Do you have problems cooking your food? I've been eating all my meals out so it's no problem, however my apartment has no stove. My school offered to give me one, but it felt awkward as I'd only use it a few times a week at most. Do you have any ideas? Maybe heating my food with a magnifying glass? Turning my veranda into a grill/smoker combo? Is is safe to start a campfire on my floor if I remove the plastic covering? It's getting expensive and inconvenient to always eat out or order delivery and then having a pile of pizza boxes.

Also, the water at my place doesn't work. Apparently the previous teacher turned it off before he left. I've just been making do by buying big bottles from GS25 and washing my hair in the sink at school, which is also where I use the toilet. My coteacher said he could call the place for me and get them to turn the water on, but I felt weird about it, not to mention I wouldn't use the water that often. But now that it's summer it's starting to get a bit rough. How do you guys do it? Do you build a rainwater collector with a charcoal filter? Have you dug a well? Is there anything to this dowsing rod stuff?

Please help! This is so overwhelming.

EDIT- OP if you felt uncomfortable about your school buying you cooking utensils and need a pot to boil stuff in, I have a surplus vintage WWII GI helmet (just be careful it's cooled down before wearing it). My friend Elphaba has a spare solid cast iron cauldron she can loan you. The only problem is it might be too big for the elevator so I hope you don't have to go up too many stairs.
« Last Edit: July 17, 2017, 02:31:40 PM by Mr.DeMartino »

Online CO2

  • The Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 2891
  • Gender: Male
  • Sort yourself out
Re: How do You Beat Humidity in Korea????
« Reply #22 on: July 17, 2017, 02:29:50 PM »
Quote
4. My house has no decent Aircon- and although my coteacher has offered to get me a small unit, I turned them down because the only time I used aircon in Korea is during Rainy season. For the rest of the time I am fine with just a fan.

Other OP issues:

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

Please help! This is so overwhelming.
hahahahaha, noice.

Offline maximmm

  • Hero of Waygookistan
  • *****
  • Posts: 1458
Re: How do You Beat Humidity in Korea????
« Reply #23 on: July 17, 2017, 02:35:07 PM »
It's not as big of a deal as you're making it out to be, I promise you.

This. They are given money specifically for NET's and making living easier. My school recently had money so they asked me what I needed. I had trouble thinking and could only think of curtains, so they bought a water filter/dispenser, and an electric kettle as well as the curtains.

I was a bit stressed about how much curtains would cost, so I just asked for some that would cover the rest of the windows that the old ones didn't. But they refused and insisted on buying complete new ones. The teacher in charge of me said "it's okay because if you  don't stay the next teacher will use them." I love my curtains, my room actually gets dark at night now. I made a much bigger deal out of it than it was.

I get that other schools have different attitudes, but if they offer to get you something without you asking for it, that means they have been given money for it. If they hassle you about it, then they are just being silly and you should just say how nice it is and thank them. Anything more than that just let it roll off your back.

The ongoing theory is, if they don't use up all of the given annual budget, they will get a much smaller budget next year (BOE will think that the school is no longer desperate for new items/stuff), so schools always try to use up as much of the provided budget as they can in order to prevent it from being cut later a year later. 

Offline stuman

  • Veteran
  • **
  • Posts: 127
  • Gender: Male
Re: How do You Beat Humidity in Korea????
« Reply #24 on: July 17, 2017, 02:38:15 PM »
You can get an electric fan for maybe 30,000. Run it all day.

You can sleep on a blanket if your bedding is still wet.

Offline JamSiManYo

  • Adventurer
  • *
  • Posts: 64
  • Gender: Male
Re: How do You Beat Humidity in Korea????
« Reply #25 on: July 17, 2017, 02:46:31 PM »
Just wanted to add that ACs are literally dehumidifiers that also happen to make the room cold. In other words, having an AC means you also have a dehumidifier. There is no difference in terms of the effect it has on humidity. The only difference is what the machine does to the warm air it pulls in. Dehumidifiers eject that air back in to the room to negate any cooling effects of the condenser.

That being said, there are some models that have a dedicated dehumidifying function. But if it's a wall unit, chances are it will still make your room cold and function just like an AC anyway.

Online yirj17

  • The Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 2661
Re: How do You Beat Humidity in Korea????
« Reply #26 on: July 17, 2017, 03:22:23 PM »
Quote
4. My house has no decent Aircon- and although my coteacher has offered to get me a small unit, I turned them down because the only time I used aircon in Korea is during Rainy season. For the rest of the time I am fine with just a fan.

Other OP issues:

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

Please help! This is so overwhelming.
hahahahaha, noice.

 :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

For serious though.  OP, you might not want one but your eventual replacement probably will.  If you don't want to use it while you're in the house, just set it on timer for a few hours before you head off to work so it can dehumidify the place and then when you get back, shut it off and use your fan. 

Online CO2

  • The Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 2891
  • Gender: Male
  • Sort yourself out
Re: How do You Beat Humidity in Korea????
« Reply #27 on: July 17, 2017, 03:31:17 PM »
In DeMartino's spirit (and don't take it personally OP, just having a bit of fun)

"So, there's this girl that I met at the bar. And she's really pretty and I'm sexually attracted to her, but I'm leaving to go back home in 2 weeks. She told me she thinks I'm very attractive, and she even suggested that I show her my apartment. But what's the point? I'm leaving soon, we would only be able to do it a few times."

Offline StillInKorea

  • Super Waygook
  • ***
  • Posts: 397
Re: How do You Beat Humidity in Korea????
« Reply #28 on: July 17, 2017, 03:37:18 PM »
In DeMartino's spirit (and don't take it personally OP, just having a bit of fun)

"So, there's this girl that I met at the bar. And she's really pretty and I'm sexually attracted to her, but I'm leaving to go back home in 2 weeks. She told me she thinks I'm very attractive, and she even suggested that I show her my apartment. But what's the point? I'm leaving soon, we would only be able to do it a few times."

And while he might not want her, his eventual replacement will.

Offline creview

  • Explorer
  • *
  • Posts: 5
Re: How do You Beat Humidity in Korea????
« Reply #29 on: July 17, 2017, 09:10:55 PM »
Yeah, AC is the best way to go. I was holding off on using my unit for as long as possible and would open my windows when it wasn't raining to dry out my bathroom after showering but when I started to use my AC, my bathroom dried more quickly than when I just opened the door to let air through. I would still take the second, small unit and run both and just deal with the comments. Maybe your school can move you to a place with decent AC if you complain enough.

If you're adamant about not accepting the AC, you can buy those 1000 won dehumidifiers boxes from Daiso. I think the most famous one is the pink box with a Hippo. Close all your doors and windows. I put a bunch around my apartment but since I started turning on my AC, they haven't filled up with water at all.

http://item2.gmarket.co.kr/English/detailview/item.aspx?goodscode=667222252

Or you can buy a dehumidifier but they're pricey and require some maintenance.

Offline pkjh

  • Hero of Waygookistan
  • *****
  • Posts: 1215
  • Gender: Male
Re: How do You Beat Humidity in Korea????
« Reply #30 on: July 18, 2017, 07:55:02 AM »
It's not as big of a deal as you're making it out to be, I promise you.

This. They are given money specifically for NET's and making living easier. My school recently had money so they asked me what I needed. I had trouble thinking and could only think of curtains, so they bought a water filter/dispenser, and an electric kettle as well as the curtains.

I was a bit stressed about how much curtains would cost, so I just asked for some that would cover the rest of the windows that the old ones didn't. But they refused and insisted on buying complete new ones. The teacher in charge of me said "it's okay because if you  don't stay the next teacher will use them." I love my curtains, my room actually gets dark at night now. I made a much bigger deal out of it than it was.

I get that other schools have different attitudes, but if they offer to get you something without you asking for it, that means they have been given money for it. If they hassle you about it, then they are just being silly and you should just say how nice it is and thank them. Anything more than that just let it roll off your back.

The ongoing theory is, if they don't use up all of the given annual budget, they will get a much smaller budget next year (BOE will think that the school is no longer desperate for new items/stuff), so schools always try to use up as much of the provided budget as they can in order to prevent it from being cut later a year later.
Also know as 'rolling average' or 'moving average'. Often average 5, to 7, years of spending. If you ever worked corporate, it's very much in the back of your mind. Going for company dinners, or buying new computers, or whatever, you're always encourage to max it out. Often it means that expensive plate, and a nice 20%+ tip, or premium gas, or that extra ram. Loved using company dime.

Offline What?What?

  • Expert Waygook
  • ****
  • Posts: 529
Re: How do You Beat Humidity in Korea????
« Reply #31 on: July 18, 2017, 08:53:07 AM »
Quote
4. My house has no decent Aircon- and although my coteacher has offered to get me a small unit, I turned them down because the only time I used aircon in Korea is during Rainy season. For the rest of the time I am fine with just a fan.

Other OP issues:

Do you have problems cooking your food? I've been eating all my meals out so it's no problem, however my apartment has no stove. My school offered to give me one, but it felt awkward as I'd only use it a few times a week at most. Do you have any ideas? Maybe heating my food with a magnifying glass? Turning my veranda into a grill/smoker combo? Is is safe to start a campfire on my floor if I remove the plastic covering? It's getting expensive and inconvenient to always eat out or order delivery and then having a pile of pizza boxes.

Also, the water at my place doesn't work. Apparently the previous teacher turned it off before he left. I've just been making do by buying big bottles from GS25 and washing my hair in the sink at school, which is also where I use the toilet. My coteacher said he could call the place for me and get them to turn the water on, but I felt weird about it, not to mention I wouldn't use the water that often. But now that it's summer it's starting to get a bit rough. How do you guys do it? Do you build a rainwater collector with a charcoal filter? Have you dug a well? Is there anything to this dowsing rod stuff?

Please help! This is so overwhelming.

EDIT- OP if you felt uncomfortable about your school buying you cooking utensils and need a pot to boil stuff in, I have a surplus vintage WWII GI helmet (just be careful it's cooled down before wearing it). My friend Elphaba has a spare solid cast iron cauldron she can loan you. The only problem is it might be too big for the elevator so I hope you don't have to go up too many stairs.

:laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: Exactly
People say nothing is impossible, but I do nothing every day.
-A.A. Milne

Offline AlexAlex85

  • Adventurer
  • *
  • Posts: 31
Re: How do You Beat Humidity in Korea????
« Reply #32 on: July 18, 2017, 09:46:10 AM »
Hello!

Hope I'm not hijacking the thread too much with this...

I live in a one room with a wall mounted AC unit.  I set it to 19 and within ten minutes or so my room is like a fridge.  Perfect!

But...a few days ago I noticed that my room isn't getting cold like it used to.  The unit is still blowing cold air (if you put your hand next to it) but the room just isn't cooling down.

I assumed it just needed a simple coolant change/top up but the repair guy said there's no problem with it.

So, can this sudden change simply be down to the recent increase in heat and humidity?  My AC unit suddenly isn't as effective?

I'm sure another user recently experienced this...Pennypie maybe??  Can't remember who it was or the outcome  :-[

Offline weigookin74

  • The Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 4174
  • Gender: Male
Re: How do You Beat Humidity in Korea????
« Reply #33 on: July 18, 2017, 10:03:40 AM »
Hello!

Hope I'm not hijacking the thread too much with this...

I live in a one room with a wall mounted AC unit.  I set it to 19 and within ten minutes or so my room is like a fridge.  Perfect!

But...a few days ago I noticed that my room isn't getting cold like it used to.  The unit is still blowing cold air (if you put your hand next to it) but the room just isn't cooling down.

I assumed it just needed a simple coolant change/top up but the repair guy said there's no problem with it.

So, can this sudden change simply be down to the recent increase in heat and humidity?  My AC unit suddenly isn't as effective?

I'm sure another user recently experienced this...Pennypie maybe??  Can't remember who it was or the outcome  :-[

19 degrees?  I thought I liked air con.  Ha ha.  I'm usually in the low to mid 20's.  Anyways, if your building is uninsulated, it'll definitely not work as well with more humid weather outside.  Not much you can do.  Either turn it down to a lower temp or get a dehumidifier to work alongside it.  (My brother in law back in Canada has one for his bedroom and he runs it all day and night in summer and keeps it at 16 degree.  I freeze when I go in there last time I stayed there visiting home.  But turning down the temps can be done?)

Online Mr.DeMartino

  • The Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 3650
  • Gender: Male
Re: How do You Beat Humidity in Korea????
« Reply #34 on: July 18, 2017, 10:13:31 AM »
Hello!

Hope I'm not hijacking the thread too much with this...

I live in a one room with a wall mounted AC unit.  I set it to 19 and within ten minutes or so my room is like a fridge.  Perfect!

But...a few days ago I noticed that my room isn't getting cold like it used to.  The unit is still blowing cold air (if you put your hand next to it) but the room just isn't cooling down.

I assumed it just needed a simple coolant change/top up but the repair guy said there's no problem with it.

So, can this sudden change simply be down to the recent increase in heat and humidity?  My AC unit suddenly isn't as effective?

I'm sure another user recently experienced this...Pennypie maybe??  Can't remember who it was or the outcome  :-[

Did he check your dust filter? Pop the cover, remove your filter. Take it outside and remove the dust. Replace.

Offline AlexAlex85

  • Adventurer
  • *
  • Posts: 31
Re: How do You Beat Humidity in Korea????
« Reply #35 on: July 18, 2017, 10:36:27 AM »
Thanks both for the replies!

He didn't even open the unit cover so god knows how he knew everything was fine (he did check the components that are on the roof though).

I cleaned the dust filters myself about a month ago but I'll give them another look!

Online zola

  • Hero of Waygookistan
  • *****
  • Posts: 1796
  • Gender: Male
Re: How do You Beat Humidity in Korea????
« Reply #36 on: July 18, 2017, 11:25:58 AM »
I do find that once the temperature and humidity outside goes up outside, those wall mounted AC units do struggle a little. I have one in my living area and its OK if you are directly under it, but it doesn't do much for the whole room. It's just not powerful enough.

Online wanderlust8

  • Adventurer
  • *
  • Posts: 65
  • Gender: Female
Re: How do You Beat Humidity in Korea????
« Reply #37 on: July 18, 2017, 11:35:41 AM »
Hello!

Hope I'm not hijacking the thread too much with this...

I live in a one room with a wall mounted AC unit.  I set it to 19 and within ten minutes or so my room is like a fridge.  Perfect!

But...a few days ago I noticed that my room isn't getting cold like it used to.  The unit is still blowing cold air (if you put your hand next to it) but the room just isn't cooling down.

I assumed it just needed a simple coolant change/top up but the repair guy said there's no problem with it.

So, can this sudden change simply be down to the recent increase in heat and humidity?  My AC unit suddenly isn't as effective?

I'm sure another user recently experienced this...Pennypie maybe??  Can't remember who it was or the outcome  :-[

Double check to make sure it's still set to air con and not dehumidify. I noticed my aircon wasn't getting my room as cold as it used to be and it kept shutting off randomly. Finally decided to translate all the buttons on my remote and realized that I somehow had changed the settings to dehumidfy instead of aircon. Switched it back and now I have cold air again.

Online Mr.DeMartino

  • The Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 3650
  • Gender: Male
Re: How do You Beat Humidity in Korea????
« Reply #38 on: July 18, 2017, 11:40:46 AM »
Some other things-

1. Wall-mounted A/Cs are rated for a certain number of pyeong, usually 6-pyeong or 10-pyeong. A 10-pyeong should be almost good enough for the average one room. If it's a 10-pyeong unit and it's struggling to cool the ol' one room, make sure your bathroom, kitchen, veranda, and foyer doors are closed (if you have them).

2. If you have big windows and they aren't tinted or glazed or whatever, you might also try doing something to keep out the sunlight.

3. If it's a 6 pyeong, that is probably too weak. I don't know if this would work, but putting a fan facing the A/C could possibly create a 'cool zone'. Also, might want to look at where you keep your computer or anything else that might generate heat. Also, consider getting a mat or something and sleeping on the floor or moving your bed to the coolest part of the room.

4. Like the poster above mentioned, check your remote and make sure all the settings are right. Hopefully you don't have it set to heat.

Offline shostager

  • Veteran
  • **
  • Posts: 191
  • Gender: Female
Re: How do You Beat Humidity in Korea????
« Reply #39 on: July 18, 2017, 12:15:24 PM »
People here seem knowledgeable about A/C and stuff, so I thought I'd shoot -

I have a wall-mounted A/C, which I use during the day when I'm at home. I would like to use it at night, however it vents onto my veranda, so I have to leave the windows open there (pretty fully open), in order to vent it outside (I tried with the windows open only a crack, and after only 10 minutes the veranda started smelling weird).

I don't feel fully comfortable leaving my windows open all night in order to keep the A/C on (I'm only on the second floor). I've been cranking it up the last couple of hours before sleep, then turning it off and using the fan if I happen to wake up too hot during the night. However, this is not ideal.

Suggestions?